(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Royal purple"



Ii&' 




" [ 


; 






ROYAL PURPLE 



ly^U 




THE I930 



c O P y R 1 G H T 
.1 930.. 

MILTON r ALLISON 

Ed.lof 

JOHN I!. COLEMAN 

Buiinct: Mflnagc' 

RONALD C PIECE 



|^5fe.-,}%^^if ^^s,;^;:- 'V; -^ % v^^ #: 



m 



m 



I 



DESIGNED AND ENGRAVED 



Royal Purple 




WW^^f^'W^ 



'~~^W^ 



I 



SPRING 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE STUDENT 
BODY OF THE KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE AT MANHATTAN 



'K^-h-lAJL'- ' .. c>^ 



^1 ' I -J ijJ Jli^ ' J^i g -JW 




^ 



-4-^- 



ALBERT W. DICKENS 



■ I OR NEARLY HALF A CENTURY ALBERT W DICKENS HAS BEEN A 

I I LOYAL BOOSTER FOR THE ACCIES HIS UPS HAVE SPOKEN HER 

PRAISES AND HELD SILENT HER SHORTCOMINGS THROUGH THE YEARS, AS 
A FACULTY MEMBER AND AS STALE FORESTER, PROFESSOR DICKENS HAS 
WORKED HARD TO PRESERVE THE STATELY TREES ON OUR CAAAPUS HIS 
HEARL HAS BEEN LILLLD Willi THE FIRE OF A SI'IRIL I HAL IS LHL KANSAS 
AGGIES'. AND HE HAS GIVEN THE BEST YEARS OF HIS LIFE fllAL THATSPIRIl 
MIGHI NEVER DIE 
TO ALBERF W DIGKLNS HIE i:)JO ROYAL PURPLL IS KLSPLG I FULLY DEDL'A I LD 



J^:: — 



//m 




// 



OR THE TWENTY-SECOND CONSECUTIVE YEAR A 



YEARBOOK IS PUBLISHED AT THIS COLLEGE. DEVELOP- 



MENTS IN THE ANCIENT ARTS OF PRINTING AND ENGRAV- 



ING, AND A DESIRE TO CREATE SOAAETHING DIFFERENT. 



HAVE THIS YEAR ENCOURAGED A DEVIATION FROM AN 



OLDER ORDER OF THINGS. AND THE 1930 RJOYAL PURPLE IS 



THE RESULT THE BASIS FOR' DIVISION IS • CHRONOLOGICAL 



AND THE BOOK THEREFORE HAS ONLY THREE PARTS FALL. 



WINTER, AND SPRING THE ACTIVITIES OF THE SEVERAL 



SCHOOLS OF THE COLLEGE HAVE BEEN PLACED IN THE 



SEASONAL PORTION OF THE BOOK CORRESPONDING TO 



THE PERIOD OF THE SCHOOL YEAR IN WHICH THEY SEEMED 



MOST PROMINENT 



IN PRESENTING THE 1930 ROYAL PURPLE TO THE STUDENTS 



OF THE KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, THE EDITOR 



AND HIS ASSOCIATES HOPE THEY WILL NOT ONLY FIND THAT 






^^ <iL 



REFLECTS THE LIFE AND SPIRIT OF "THE AGGIES." BUT THAT 



.'-& =5 



THEY WILL ALSO KEEP IT THROUGH THE YEARS AS AN ACCUR- 



ATE RECORD OF THE EVENTS OF 1929 AND 1930. 




THt HILL" 



ffWW 






: 9 v: 










^^, 
/' ^^*i- 





BOOK ONE 



BOOK TWO 



BOOK 'IlIRr 



FALL 



WINTER 






THE HILL 







I II meet you in Anderson. " How 
those words rins with warm fdmilidrity 
to every man or woman who has ever 
been an Aggie. One of the oldest 
buildings on the campus^ it stands as a 
monument to the work of John A. 
Anderson, an early president of the 
college. Beginning with the north 
wing, devoted to the classes in agri- 
culture, additions were made until the 
native white limestone building, now 
administrative, stood complete. From 
her ancient ivy-covered tower, each 
morning and each noon, the tones of 
the college bell may be heard above 
the din of noisome horns and passing 
traffic. 




ANDERSON HALL 








Men delved into history and biousht 
forth the library in Tudor Gothic 
style of architecture. With quiet tread 
we go to find the oldest classics of the 
world, the stories of philosophy^ re- 
ligion, and races from the very early 
moments of recorded history, hiere 
we discover the papers of Addison 
and Steele, the poetry of .lohn Milton, 
and the gems of the thinking of men 
from oldest times to the modern day . . 
Plato, Aristotle, Confucius, and Freud. 
We encounter on our way the serious 
minded and the scholarly. They seek 
to learn, and that right well, for 
college is no place of frivolous leisure 
and pleasant idleness for them. 




THE LIBRARY 




Each day the lasging steps of the 
student late to class seek the welcome 
shade of historic Fairchild. Its walks 
lead to chapel, and to the gymnasium. 
Its nothern lawn is graced by the 
statue of Senator h^arriS/ a Kansas 
stockman. On warm spring days its 
beauty is enhanced by fluffy snow- 
balls/ white and beautiful. This former 
library and building of the agricultural 
sciences bears the name of the college 
president from 1879 to 1897, George 
T. Fairchild. Constructed of native 
rugged limestone, it symbolizes the 
lasting quality of his work for the 
"Aggies". Ardent students of zool- 
ogy, physiology, and history now 
trudge up its well worn stairways. 




FAIRCHILD HALL 




In Horticulture hall the most minute 
orsdnisms of plant life assume life-like 
proportions under microscopes. Here 
men study the haunts of the Phycomy- 
cetes, while down below carefree 
Ass returning from a field trip fill 
their pockets with college apples. 
Nearby we find the college green- 
house^ filled with wonders of another 
world ... the palm, the famed banana 
tree, and beautiful flowers. To the left 
we see the rock garden, and the silver 
reflecting pool covered with pond 
lillies. To the east we see the formal 
garden, lover's lane, and the presi- 
dent's home, while in the green valley 
below stands the stately pine grove. 




HORTICULTURE HALL 





Erected to the gods of fair play and 
clean sport, Nichols gymnasium por- 
trays in its architecture those noble 
characteristics of the brave knights of 
feudal England. Named for a former 
president, the towers of Nichols hark 
back to the day of chivalry in old 
Britain. We are reminded also of the 
years when we were struggling for a 
place in the sun. Within these walls 
men learn to be good sportsmen, and 
to play the game for the love of it. 
Led by Mike and Bo they are 
here imbued with that fighting Wild- 
cat spirit, the flame of which grows 
brighter as the years go by . . . and 
somehow, never dies! 







NICHOLS GYMNASIUM 




Electrical currents and railrodd curves 
mingle with cosines and tangents in 
this temple of empire builders, the 
Engineering building. Behind its por- 
tals- men study who will someday 
build a higher Eiffel tower, or a better 
Brooklyn bridge. To the right lies the 
memorial stadium, scene of many grid- 
iron battles. To the left one sees 
Kedzie hall and the main campus drive. 
Behind the building is the roaring 
giant of heat and light, the new power 
plant. Across the little valley to the 
front, one may see the spring football 
men hitting the line, and tennis rackets 
swinging smartly. From around the 
right of the hall there often emerges a 
happy group returning from a baseball 
game or an intramural contest. 




ENGINEERING BUILDING 




Dedicated to one of the oldest and 
most honorable professions of man, 
agriculture, Waters hall shelters the 
northern portion of the campus with 
its two white limestone wings. Across 
the valley one sees the residence of 
college women, Van Zile hall. To the 
right one may see the oldest building 
on the campus, farm mechanics hall. 
To the north lies the livestock barns, 
the old serum plant road, and the 
poultry pens. From the rear, the low- 
ing of cattle and the smell of new 
mown hay indicate that ours is a 
college of practice as well as theory. 
hHenry Jackson Waters, for whom the 
hall IS named, was president of the 
college from 1907 until 1917. 





WATERS HALL 







BOOK ONE 




V 



■ IP EPTEMBERS ROADS LEAD TO 

■ : J THE HILL, WHERE THE ADMIN- 

ISTRATION WAITS TO RECEIVE THE 
TIMID FROSH . THEN COMES THE 
BIC THRILL— FOOTBALL . . MINOR 
ATHLETICS FOLLOW, THEN THE FRAT 
BOYS WITH THEIR LINE , BUSY 
CLUBS FOLLOW THESE FALL 
FEATURES ARE ATTRACTIVE 
LETS LOOK AND SEE . . . 



F 



mi^- 



A 



SfcOCfe-(2viV;.\-^iti;^:.-;-;-j.W:T: I-,. -~_ 



mmmmm^ 




L 



• J 1. . • - ivj^ rmrxf^jrT 



L 



Administration 



Board of Regents 



npHE Kansas state institutions of higher education have been, since July 1, 1925, under the management of a 
state board of regents, the nine members of which are appointed by the governor for terms of four years each. 
While such selection is not statutory the appointments have been made to represent all congressional districts, 
with one at large. W. Y. Morgan has been chairman of the board since its creation; Mrs. Lola K. Crow is secre- 
tary. The members receive no salary, but are paid expenses when on school business. Four meetings a year are 
required, but many more than that number are held. 

Primarily the board of regents was established that the state schools under its direction might be taken out 
of politics and be conducted as a unit of higher education, with such coordination as to give the fullest service 
possible, and to avoid undue overlapping of curricula. To this end the board has maintained close contact 
with the work of the schools, and has sought to bring their activities into a harmonious and effective rela- 
tion to complete educational accomplishment. 

The following institutions are under the control of the board at present: University of Kansas, Lawrence; 
K. S. A. C, Manhattan; Bell Memorial hospital, Kansas City; state teacher's colleges of Hays, Emporia, and 
Pittsburg; and experiment stations at Colby, Fort Hays, Garden City, and Tribune. 

Members of the board with the expiration of their terms are: W. Y. Morgan, Hutchinson, June 30, 1930; 
C. M. Harger, Abilene, June 30, 1930; M. G. Vincent, Pittsburg, June 30, 1930; C. B. Merriam, Topeka, June 30, 
1931; C. W. Spencer, Sedan, June 30, 1931; B. C. Culp, Beloit, June 30, 1932; W. E. Ireland, Yates Center, June 
30, 1932; C. C. Wilson, Meade, June 30, 1933; and O. A. Stauffer, Arkansas City, June 30, 1933- 




Administration 




F. D. Farrell, President 



npHERE are three general types of colleges. One type, the old 
fashioned arts college, offers only courses that people study 
chiefly for the purpose of learning how to live. A second type, 
a sort of collegiate trade school, offers only vocational courses 
that people study chiefly for the purpose of learning to earn a 
livelihood. A third type occupies an educational field between 
the first two. It offers a variety of courses, including many that 
are strictly vocational and many others that are non-vocational 
to most students. 

Kansas State Agricultural college is of the third type. It is 
a technological institution where students are trained for more 
than four hundred occupations in the fields of agriculture, engin- 
eering, home economics, general science and veterinary medicine. 
Besides technical subjects, these students are required or en- 
couraged to study numerous courses that are essentially non- 
vocational. 

The college provides for well balanced education that helps 
to fit young men and young women for both usefulness and happi- 
ness. It is a college of the people, helpfully interested in every- 
day problems and proud of its place in American education. Its 




Tlie President 



four thousand students represent every section of Kansas, more 
than half the states of the Union and several foreign countries. 
Its atmosphere is youthful, vigorous, democratic and stimulating. 



'^^^mm^m^^^mfM'M 



¥^^mmm^^^^^^^ 



Administration 



npHE position of the dean of women is based on the ideal for 
students of the highest physical, intellectual, social, moral, 
and spiritual development. The objective of the dean of women is 
through co-operation with the various campus and community 
agencies to contribute to the realizaton of this ideal. The 
problems of living conditions, of health, of student emp'oyment, 
of vocational guidance, of social and religious life, of student 
discipline, and of the extra-curricular activities are but different 
aspects of this objective and are her special concern. 



The Dean of 



The dean of women serves on committees, recommends 
students for loans, sponsors the Big Sister program, housemother 
meetings, personal and group interviews and social events. She 
co-operates with the Student Governing association, with 
Mortar Board, with the Y. W. C. A., with the panhellenic 
councils, with the A. A. U. W., with the college appointment 
bureau and with the churches of Manhattan, giving to each the 
support that is needed to make their work with students effective. 
She fosters in the students the president's ideals for the college 
and presents to the president the student view point. 

The routine duties of the dean of wom.en's office do not 
express the deeper significance of the dean's work. Her office is 
a place of friendliness and helpfulness. The service rendered by 
her staff is recognized as an essential factor in the life and ideals 
of the college. 




Mary P. Van Zile, Dean 



W^, SJS»T~y.' 




Page 27 



Admhiistratioji 




npHE office of the Registrar is primarily concerned with keeping 
an accurate record of the results of college teaching and 
making those results available to the students, to other institu- 
tions, to honor societies, and to social or literary organizations. 

In the last few years this office has taken on a new signifi- 
cance, and the discovery has been made that much of statistical 
value is found in the study of the grades earned by students. It 
is therefore fast becoming a laboratory for research in education, 
the grades being used as a basis for thesis material for graduate 
students. 

Numerous studies mav be carried on in this laboratory in 
the attempt to arrive at improved methods of teaching, more 
equitable methods of grading, causes of success or failure in 
college, student mortality, the effect of athletics on scholarship, 
and the effect of environment on scholarship. The possibilities 
of using the registrar's office as a scientific laboratory are being 
rapidly developed and thus the students of the college are, in a 
very real sense, contributing to the future welfare of their fellows 
for the information thus obtained will undoubtedly influence 
methods of college procedure in the future. 



Jessie McDowell Machir, Registrar 




The Registrar 



This year, 1929-1930, three thousand nuie hundred ninety-one 
(3991) students have furnished the laboratory material for various 
forms of research — a larger number by one hundred twelve than 
last year. 



^^^m^^^^^m^^m^^ 



m^m^i^^^mm^ 



npHE curricula of the Division of Agriculture provides 
training for those who wish to devote their lives to 
agriculture, the largest and most essential industry in 
Kansas. The division is well prepared to provide such 
training. It is well manned by a large staff of high-class 
teachers who are specialists in their respective fields of 
work. It is equipped with adequate laboratory facilities, 
extensive greenhouses, large numbers of high-class animals 
of all important breeds, and numerous experimental fields 
and plots that make it one of the best equipped agricultural 
educational organizations in the world. 

Training is offered by the division in four curricula: 
agriculture, agricultural administration, landscape garden- 
ing and the combined six year curricula in agriculture and 
veterinary medicine. These curricula offer opportunity for 
the election of a wide choice of subject matter and provide 
adequate training for more than 100 useful and interesting 
occupations. 

The members of the class that graduated in 1929 are 
now employed in 24 different occupations, all in the field of 
agriculture and all necessary for the fullest development of 
the agriculture industry of the state. Thirty-six percent of 
this class are now farming, others are serving in the class 
room, in scientific laboratories, in county agent activities, 
in flour mills, in greenhouses, in creameries, in editorial 
work, in landscape gardening activities, and many other 
positions serving agriculture. The attractive opportunities 
open to well trained men in all lines of agriculture endeavor 
are numerous. 



Administration 

The Division of 
:ure 




L. E. Call, /)t\/;/ 




Administration 




R. A. Seaton, Dean 



ipNGINEERING plays an exceedingly prominent part in 
modern life. Most of the conveniences, comforts and 
luxuries of our civilization are the direct result of engineering 
effort. The work of the engineer is chiefly to adapt and to utilize 
for the benefit of mankind the forces and materials of nature. 
Each new discovery of the physicist and chemist and each new 
practical application of known physical and chemical phenomena 
present new opportunities for further extension of the field of 
service of the engineer, so that his work is constantly broadening 
and expanding, and the number of men required to carry on the 
engineering activities of the country is constantly increasing. 

The enrollment in the Division of Engineering of the Kansas 
State Agriculture college has grown in recent years until it now 
includes more than one thousand students, approximately twice 
the enrolment of ten years ago. The reason for this growth is 
found in the constantly increasing application of engineering 
methods and engineering products in all fields of human action, 
and the opportunity this provides for increasing numbers of 
graduates of this institution to find interesting, worth while, 
and profitable emplovment in engineering activities. 

The Division offers four year curricula in agricultural engin- 




The Division of 
Engineering 



eering, architectural engmeering, architecture, chemical engin- 
eering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, flour-mill engin- 
eering, landscape architecture, and mechanical engineering. 



mm&?^^^m^Pr^^^^!m^ 



f^^m^m^mmm^i 



Administration 



TpROGRESS is made through a knowledge of pertinent facts 
and information. It is not only through the simple possession 
of pertinent information that progress is made, but by its intelli- 
gent practice by individuals and by groups. 

As population increases and better means of communication 
are perfected, progress becomes relatively more dependent upon 
group than upon individual action. Consequently, successful 
extension teaching requires not only constant study regarding 
facts and information which pertain to the problems of the rural 
community, but also to the principles of group action. 

In a thesis recently submitted for a doctor's degree in an 
eastern university it was shown that of twenty points necessary 
for a successful extension worker, subject matter knowledge was 
the eighteenth point in rank of importance. Of the seventeen 
other points given as superior requirements, eight were personal 
qualifications contributing to leadership. 

These facts are important to know if one is to perform a 
function in his community as a leader and one whose influence 
may be exerted to accomplish progress by means of groups. 



Tlie DivisioEi of 

Lsion 




Harry Umberger, Dea)i 




Administration 




J. T. WiLLARD 

Dean 



Prof. C. M. Correll 
Assistant Dean 



npHE various objects which parents have in view 
^ in sending their children to college, and those 
of students who go to college on their own ac- 
count, differ widely in character. Primarily most 
of them are related to occupational effectiveness. In 
this age of speed, mass production, sharp competition, 
intelligent combination and severe individual strain, 
it is of great importance in all education to' provide 
adequate technical preparation and training for one's 
chosen occupation, and at the same time to insure 
some htness for the duties of citizenship in a republic, 
and for lifelong satisfaction in one or more of the 
fields of general culture. 

Most of the curricula offered in this college are 
professional in character, that is, they prepare one 
for work in a definite occupation involving consider- 
able intellectual and cultural development. 

It is the province of the Division of General 
Science to give the fundamental training in mathe- 
matics, english and the several sciences that is 
essential to adequate acquisition and use of the spe- 
cialized technical disciplines. At the same time it 
offers subjects that develop the capacity for intellec- 
tual and emotional enjoyment that is independent of 
vocational application. 

Furthermore, there are several professional cur- 
ricula administered by this division, most of the 
Icourses in which ate given by it. These are: com- 
Imerce, general science, industrial chemistry, industrial 




The 



ivision of 
Science 



journalism, physical education for men, physical 
education for women, public school music, public 
school band and orchestra, piano, voice, and violin. 
In each of these there is more or less opportunity for 
varying the work through the choice of electives. In 
this way those who are preparing for teaching may 
get courses in education, and those who plan to enter 
scientific research may greatly increase their specific 
preparation. 



W^M^^^?rrf:^i^^^?^^?^SS^^s^m 



vmm^mmmmmmm^^ 



Page S2 



Admimstratton 



in\R. RODNEY W. BABCOCK, the new dean of the division of 
General Science, is a mathematician and physicist, young, 
scholarly and genuinely interested in students, especially good 
students. At the time of his appointment to the deanship here 
he was chairman of the department of mathematics and director 
of the Astronomical Observatory at De Pauw University. He did 
his undergraduate work at the University of Missouri where he 
majored in mathematics. His graduate work was done at the 
University of Wisconsin where he majored in mathematics and 
minored in physics. He obtained the M. A. and the Ph. D. 
degrees at Wisconsin. 



Tke Division of 



For six years before going to De Pauw, Dr. Babcock was a 
member of the mathematics faculty of the College of Letters and 
Science, University of Wisconsin. At the same time he worked 
with the university examiner on college entrance work and was 
active m the development of a student-advisor system. In these 
activities, as well as in his teaching, he was popular with both 
students and faculty members. Before going to Wisconsin, he 
was a member of the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. 
It is hoped that in addition to his work as dean Dr. Babcock will 
offer an elementary course in astronomy, a course which should 
be popular with many of the better students of all the divisions 
of the college. Dr. Babcock is one of the prominent younger 
members of the Mathematical Association of America and is 
vice-president and secretary of Gamma Alpha, national graduate 
scientific fraternity. 




Dr. Rodney W. Babcock 

Dain after July 1, 19 V) 




Page SS 



Administration 




''^/O.ENUINE home-making is much more than what is called 
housekeeping. Good housekeeping is a sine qua non of 
home-making, but it is not sufficient. In addition to this, success- 
ful home-making requires provision for the culture and happiness 
of the family, for the intellectual, spiritual and aesthetic well- 
being of the household. It is not confined to the interior of the 
house. It extends to the surroundings of the dwelling and to the 
entire community. Genuine home-making is an exceedingly 
difficult and supremely important undertaking. It is a business, 
a science, and an art. It is the greatest of all the professions." 

Thus does a great educator of today epitomize the work for 
which the division of Home Economics strives to give worthy 
training. Dean Margaret M. Justin and the teaching staff of the 
division find inspiration and responsibility in the professional 
instruction of the large number of young women, most of whom 
will be the home-makers of the future. Many other professions 
are open to women trained in home economics, and graduates 
of the Kansas State Agricultural College are in important posi- 
tions throughout the world. 

There are three curricula in the division: general home 
economics, home economics with special training in art, and 



Margaret M. Justin, Dean 




Tke Division of 
Home Economics 



home economics and nursing. Graduate work is offered with the 
possibility of majoring in food economics and nutrition, clothing 
and textiles, art, household economics, institutional economics, 
child welfare and euthenics, and home economics education. The 
training received by the student has been planned with regard 
for both the cultural and practical aspects of education. 



^^^^^mm^^m^^ 



Administration 



npHE summer school is an integral part of the regular college 
year. There are two sessions, one beginning immediately 
after the close of the spring semester and continuing for nine 
weeks. The other is held for four weeks during the month of 
July. Practically all departments offer a wide range of graduate 
and under-graduate courses. Since all the laboratories, libraries 
and facilities of the experiment station are available the summer 
school offers an excellent opportunity for graduate work. 

The controlling purpose of this college in administering the 
summer school is to furnish a pleasant work environment for the 
students. Outside attractions and distractions are reduced to a 
minimum. We purposely avoid creating a vacation environment, 
predicated on the theory that the students come to the summer 
school for work not for a vacation. It is the unanimous opinion 
of faculty and students that the students do better work in the 
summer school than during the regular college year. 

The student body is made up of about forty per cent of 
students who are enrolled during the regular college year, and 
sixty per cent of teachers from the schools of the state. 

A formal commencement is held at the close of the summer 
school for students completing the work for the B. S. and M. S. 
degrees. Eighty-two B. S. degrees and fifty M. S. degrees were 
conferred at the summer school commencement in 1929. 



The Sunmier Scliool 




E. L. HoLTON, Uean 




Page Si 



Administration 




R. R. Dykstra, Dean 



¥N THE United States there are eleven veterinary schools — all 
of them state supported — and all connected with colleges and 
universities. One is at the Kansas State Agricultural college. 

Four of the American schools have received recognition from 
the federal War Department by delegation to each of them of an 
army veterinary officer, and the establishment in each of a veter- 
inary unit of the Reserve Officer's Training Corps. The Kansas 
State Agricultural college is one of the four. 

The physical equipment for the teaching of veterinary medi- 
cine in this college is excellent, consisting of Veterinary hall, 
and the Veterinary hospital — both large stone buildings — as well 
as the general college buildings. Commodious classrooms and 
well equipped laboratories are in evidence. 

In addition to receiving instruction from members of the 
general college faculty — the students in veterinary medicine are 
guided in their academic work by the veterinary staff, consisting 
of twelve men, all graduates from leading colleges and univer- 
sities. 

The opportunities for veterinarians are continually broad- 
ening, and all of them virtually have the assurance of remuner- 
ative professional employment upon graduation from college. 




The Division of 



Medicine 



either as veterinary practitioners, as federal and state veterin- 
arians, in the United States Army, as research workers in animal 
diseases, as teachers, and by employment in closely related fields. 

In order to matriculate as a student in veterinary medicine, 
high school graduation or its equivalent is essential. For the 
1929-1930 college year, 120 high school graduates were enrolled. 



'^^m^mti^^^^m^m 



Administration 



npHE office of men's advisor and secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. is the center of many and varied 
activities. In this office is to be found the employ- 
ment bureau, and the rooming house bureau for men. 
Students come to the office for help, counsel, and 
guidance in increasing numbers. 

The headquarters of the college Y. M. C. A. is 
located in the office of Dr. Holtz. This organization 
has a usual membership of from seven to eight 
hundred, with seventeen standing committees, several 
special committees, and many individual responsi- 
bilities. The college "Y" carries on a very extensive 
and comprehensive program. 

The men's advisor is ready at all times to be of 
any assistance possible to any student. He welcomes 
opportunities for personal interviews and conferences. 

A good slogan to follow: "When discouraged, 
come to Doc's office." 



Tke Advisor to 




Dr. a. a. HoLiz 




Administration 




Yeager 

Nutter 



Roci 



BONFIELD 



Student's Governing Association 



James J. Yeager 
Karl H. Pfuetze - 
James P. Bonfield 
Margaret McKinney 



STUDENT COUNCIL MEMBERS 

President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



Clarence E. Nutter 
Esther Rockey 
Milton F. Allison 



"pOR the hist ten years Student Council has been in control of student affairs on the campus of the Kansas 
■^ State Agricultural College. During these ten years, the power and the prestige of the council has grown, 
and its place on the campus has become firmly established. 

A Student Self-Governing Association at Kansas State Agricultural College had its beginning in the spring 
of 1920. The purpose of the organization was to place the control and advancement of student interests and 
activities in the hands of the student body. 

At the time of the organization of the body, there were twenty-one students placed on the executive council 
with many other students working on committees. The president and vice-president of the executive council , 
were elected from the student body at large and the other nineteen members were chosen representatives froni . 
campus organizations. Under this system the secretary and treasurer were.plected from the body as well as all 
the committee chairmen. "' %, j'' 



^S^^«iig|iS^ii^^S^S^^?5^g 



Vage 38 



Administration 

Students' Governing Association 

TN THE spring of 1926, a meeting of the student body was held and a new constitution was passed upon which 
called for a Student Council composed of seven members to be elected from the student body at large. The 
name of the council was changed from the Student's Self-Governing Association to the Students' Governing 
Association. From that time to this, student affairs at the Kansas State Agricultural College have been handled 
by a council of seven members. 

At the present time, every member of the college student body is a member of the Student Governing 
Association. Payment of the five dollar activity fee at the beginning of each semester entitles the student to 
membership in the association. Membership means the privilege of casting votes at class elections, to run for 
office in the class elections, to vote for members of the Student Council and to be a candidate for membership 
in that body. 

Members of the Student Council are elected each spring to hold office until the new members are elected 
the next year. Upon presentation of a petition signed by twenty-five persons, any regularly matriculated student 
of sophomore standing may become a candidate. Candidates may also be nominated at the annual spring meeting 
of the association. The Council has full power to regulate social functions of all kinds, establish rules and 
regulations for student residences and enforce discipline among students as outlined by the executive bodies of 
the college. 

At the first meeting of the Student Council after its election in the spring, the election of officers is held. 
The president has charge of all official business and presides at all meetings, the vice-president is chairman 
of jurisprudence, the secretary is chairman of student's social affairs, and the treasurer has charge of the funds. 




Pane 30 



Administration 




QPPORTUNITIES for leadership and service to K. S. A. C. 
^^ continue and become most effective after the student leaves 
the campus. Our alumni maintain an active interest in their 
Alma Mater. Their activities are as varied as campus activities. 
Many are influential in sending outstanding students to K. S. A. C. 
Others are active in their local alumni associations. Others 
express their loyalty by giving money or gifts to the college, the 
Alumni Loan fund, or the Memorial Stadium. Still others are 
interested in obtaining adequate appropriations and favorable 
legislation to meet the needs of a growing institution. 

The Alumni Association is active and effective in all practical 
enterprises that tend to build a greater K. S. A. C. Further, and 
as a result of homecomings, class reunions, alumni meetings, and 
the disseminating of college and alumni news through the Kansas 
Industrialist, the spirit of K. S. A .C. developed by the students 
on the campus continues to grow and to become more and more 
a source of intense pride and satisfaction to the alumnus. 

Our new alumni, the class of 1930, will find that the Alumni 
Association begins where their student days end. The Alumni 
office is the connecting link between the former student and 
K. S. A. C. 

Officers of the K. S. A. C. Alumni Association are: Board of 
Directors: Ralph Snyder, '90, President, Manhattan; Mame 
(Alexander) Boyd, '02, Vice-President, Phillipsburg; W. E. 
Grimes, '13, Treasurer, Manhattan; H. Umberger, '05, Secretary, 



K. L. Ford 

Ahn/ni! Secretary 




Tke Aiumni 
Association 



Manhattan; E. L. Cottrell, '99, Wabaunsee; C. E. Friend, '88, 
Lawrence; H. W. Avery, '91, Wakefield; R. J. Barnett, '95, 
Manhattan; R. A. Seaton, '04, Manhattan. Advisory Council: 
Daisy (Hoffman) Johntz, '00, Abilene; Cliff J. Stratton, '11, 
Topeka; Charles Shaver, '15, Salnia; Loren Lupfer, '17, Earned; 
Ed Hodgson, '03, Little River. 



^^^^^^s^^^^^^ma^m^^^^^&m^^^ 



Freshmen 




Freslimen Class Officers 



First Semester 

Wm. Richmond --------- Frcsident 

J. G. Kimball ..---_-. Vke-Presidefit 

Ruth McNally -------- Treasurer 

Margaret Pierson ------- Secretary 

Edward Satunas -------- Marshall 

Edward Criner -------- Historian 

Second Semester 

Edward S. Sullivan ------- President 

Russell Smith -------- Vice-President 

Reuben Sparks --------- Secretary 

Frank Gwinn -------- Treasurer 

Forrest Booth - --- Marshall 




Freshmen 




^%1\M 






y^l^^n 





Lola Mae Adams Velma Allen Everett Asjes Thomas Avery Albert Badcr Don F. Beath 

Dodge City Liberty Kansas City Coldwater Junction City Chanut 



Robert Besler Leslie Blake Ha:le Blana Douglas Bly Thomas Bond Forrest Booth 

Manhattan Glaseo Garden City Piereeville Cumberland Fairvicw 



Doris Bramwcll Veva Brewer Robert Briix Barkos Brown Rita Brown Burnill Buikstra 

Concordia Wichita White City Osborne Edmond Cawker City 



Henry Byers 



Mareine (Campbell Carroll Carlgren LeRoy Carver Joe Cavanaugh Charlotte Chatterton 

Flollis ScanJia Junction City Esbon Admire 



Blanch Chrislcnscn Lea (Solicit 

Bushong Manl- 



l^aul Converse I I. C. Cooley Bessie Copper Perry Course 

I'awnccRock St,;ckt<;n McD.mald Abilene 



Page I.Z 



Freshmen 






4ii Jm ^tk ^ 





Verne Cowell E. R. Crans Elizabeth Crawlord Edward E. Criner Stanley E. CumminKS Harold A DaiK 

Eairbury, Nfbr. Lenora Madison Wamcgo ('ciLKvai'. r 



DalK.n 
l-n 



av.rcncc nanicis ti A. Davldsun Bertus Deters Leonard Dcvore ellivcr Dil-a' 

I laiRler, Nebr. Cimarron Cawker Clitv Marka 



SanJy Doubleday Maurice 1>.\\ nmj; I kjward Drew Maurice Du Mars Walkicc Duncan Morence Dur 

Seldcn Dcerlicid Rolla Aura 'I'opcka 



Ruh.ird I-". I'.id. 



George E, Erdtinniiii 

EIInwoiiI, 



W L^ I'aI wards 



C;ouncil C.ro' 



Pago J,S 



Freshmen 








'^^^W ^^^w ^^^ %^ ^^ ^m 








Maxine f-oncs K. E. F^'ootc 

Kansas City. Mo. 



Marjorie Forbes Joseph F. Foster Glenn S. Fo 

Chase Columbus Topeka 



Gcraldinc Freeman 
Rozel Hamilte 



Olive Caddie Harry Canstrom Margaret Gillespie John K. Glasscock John E. Going E. W. Green 

Wellington Mollis Harper Moline Topeka Concordia 



Gilbert Green Arthur L. Gribbcn Arthur Groesbeck, Jr. Rose Grosshardt Frank W. Gwinn AVi 

Norton Gypsum Manhattan Clallin Manhattan 



Stanton. Nebr. 



Jack I-. Mall Helen 1 1. I larrison (J, B. I larrop Fred Hartman Mary Harvey Harry lla.sler 

Ojuncil Grove Burden Manhaitan Horton Idarvcvville ILlDorado 



Oivid Henley Max Hickman 

Eureka 



ill R.M.Hodgson Hiliun I k.llci 

Horton Lil tie River 



W.ishinglon 



Page ii 



mM ^fm MM mm mim ^fM 



Freshmen 






%WM 




La Vona Horner Raymond H. Hughes B. H. Hull Walter G. Hume John M. Hurd Howard I lymes 

Fellsburs Manhattan Concordia Arkansas Citv Pawnee. Nebr. Arlington 



Frank A, Irwin Lorictalves Roberta jack llazle .lames Ralph James Charles 1- Johnson 

Manhattan Ml ll<.pe Russell New England. N. D. Rossv.lle Bel 



Leora Johnson Myrtle Johnson Lenore Jones Waller J , Jones Isabelle Kaine E. Laurance Karr 

Brookville Concordia Chanuic El Dorado Wame.go Troy 



LTVere Kay Mary E Keegan Earle Kent J P. Kcsler Jay G 

Morland Greal Bend (Carthage. Mo. Ovcrbrook 



Robert Kissick, Jr. W. G Klein Zora I. K 

Kansas C'ity 1 lalslead 



M Knkwood 

I eavenworth 



Louise Krauss 
Marvsville Topeka 



"^^^^^^^m^^^m 



Page J, 5 



Freshmen 











^^■W ^^m' '^^^)mt ^'^i 

Jk ^4 ii.^ ^ 



UWy Krause Harold Kugler RoRcr Lang Gladys C. Langdon Harry E. Latlin Beulah Leach 

Marysville Ahilcne Denver, Colo. Lebanon Gypsum Bird Ci 



Russell Leaman Urban Lodge Lillian Lohmeyer Clark H. Long Margaret A. Lynch Ted R. McCandles' 

Concordia Wellington Bern Lladdam Hutchinson Si 



lal McCordJr IvanMcDougal l-.dna McCill Ruth McNally L.irraine Martinson Ruth Mears 

Manhattan Chardon Moscow Olathe Topeka Simpson 



Anton Mermis Donald K, Meyer John W Meyers Virgil L Mc 

Gorham lopeka Merriam 



litna Morgan 
Narka Hi 



Lcc Morgan 



Buard L Moles Henry Muth I larold New Rollm A Newcombe Sydney B. North Reynold Nvdell 

Scottsville Washington Lenexa Manhattan Marlow, (Ula. Cleburne 



Freshmen 





4li JTA ^m ^'% iJk g 

AM ^M -3: h^ 




m 






C. Cross Page Grant W. Paeie 

Norton Dc 



Aicillc Palmquist Horace A. Paske Dorothy Pea'^e 

C^oncor^lin Toronto Manhattan 



Eugene W Pwk I-rcJ A Pccry Erma Perry F.lizabel h Pluci -e Pl.zahei h Pool,- 

Falls City, Nebr. Manhattan Greenleaf Manliattan Kansas Citv. M 



Margaret Picrson C 

lays Wakeeney 



■■)'■ 
ress, l\ 



Clarence L, Keisv 



Racr.K.n PJith Ranu v 

1 l.ncnsMlU- Manhati.: 



A RanJall Mill, ,n Raven C llaJvs ReJdinf>l on l-AcrllRccJ j.ihn Reinecke 

Ashlan I Morrowville Blue RapiJs Smith Cciuer tMcal BenJ 



GeorKc P, RhoaJcs W A Richni,.M 

Ashland 



Page 1,7 



Freshmen 




^ > 





lilM 



t-kiit m^ M mJm ^»m w^ t ^t 



lt7i 







Q ^ O 

44 ^ : i 




. •-■J^'g- 



Elizabeth Roniger Maxine Roper Hugh Rorh Myra Roth Dorothy D. Ruscoe Edward Satunas 

Elmdale Manhattan Ness City Ness City Wakefield Manhattar 



Grace L, Scholz Elbcr: K. Schuler Louis C. Schwankc R, W. Schwindler Gardney SeUers Doris Shaver 

Manhattan Valley Falls Alma Manhattan Downs Cedar Vale 



Mildred Shawver Nina M. Sherman Wayne Shier Dessie Sigg Ted Skinner Lyic L. Smelser 

Kincaid Grinnell Gypsum Chapman Manhattan Manhattan 



en Smerehck Esther Smiley Orville Snyder Maxine Stanley George Stanshury Lois Starbuck 

Garnetr Manhattan Salina Concordia Ulysses Goodland 



larry Steele Marvey Sleiger Byron Stephenson Marjorie Stevenson Marion Stiles Rowena Stiles 

Arcadia Menlo Sedan Oberlin Jewell Kansas City 



Freshmen 

















l^li J^ . .\^^ ^M 





Ruth V. Stiles Lois Stingley Cora Stout Edward S. Sullivan Dorothy Sutton 

Kansas Citv Manhattan Russell Mcrcier Kinsma 



Everest Mount 1 lope Goodland l>latisl->urn Dodge Ci 



jld Tottc-n Bessie Tyree John Van Aken Ralph Van Camp Stephen Vesecky 

Clifton Wayne Lyons ('ouneil C uo\e Kansas C" 



Kendall Walker Fern Wentz Alfred Wilson Walter Wilson I ois W mduite 

Glen rilder Concordia Valley Center Lincoln Nickerson 



Ed F. Wood Amos A. Wnuhl Verlcsler ^oung Wavne "1 ouo.l; ticrald A. ^ ounie 

RockhursL Concordia 1 laddam Alexander Natoma 



Page 49 



/COMPLETE control of the department oi athletics 
at the college rests in the hands of the Athletic 
Council. This hoard is composed of the director of 
athletics and six members of the college faculty. 
Duties of the Council include the consideration of all 
questions oi finance, the hiring of coaches, approving 
schedules for all games and athletic contests, and 
approval of recommendations by the coaches for "K" 
letter and sweater awards. In fact, all major matters 
are referred to the Council for approval or rejection. 
Dr. H. H. King, chairman of the Athletic Council, is 
the representative to the Big Six conference faculty 
council and is chairman of that board. Most of the 
problems of the latter consist of questions of eligibility 
of athletes in the conference. Director M. F. Ahearn 
has been head oi the department of athletics since 
1920, and has attained a high degree of efficiency in 

this capacity. He is also the representative of the Missouri Valley section on the National Football Rules 
committee. Members of the Council are: Dr. H. H. King, chairman, head of the department of chemistry; 
M. F. Ahearn, director of athletics; Prof. E. L. Holton, head of the department of education; President F. D. 
Farrell, Prof. R. I. Throckmorton, head of the department of agronomy; and Prof. G. A. Dean, head of the 
department of entomology. 




M. F. "Mike" Ahearn 
Director of Athletics 




Page SO 




Football 



BIG SIX FOOTBALL STANDINGS 





Won 


Tied 


Lost 


Pet. 


Pts. 


O.P 


Nebraska 


3 


2 





LOGO 


93 


62 


Missouri 


3 


1 


1 


.750 


78 


28 


Kansas Aggies 


3 





2 


.600 


55 


102 


Okiahoma 


2 


1 


2 


.500 


81 


81 


Kansas 


2 





3 


.400 


91 


50 


Iowa State 








5 


.000 


54 


128 



A. N. "Bo" McMiLLiN 
Head Coach 

A LVIN N. "BO" McMILLIN gave Kansas Aggie football fans during the season of 1929 just what they were 
-^^ looking for — plenty of thrills. Upon the held the clever mentor would place a fighting eleven which would 
always turn out their best and keep the opponents on the alert for the many trick plays. JMcMillin was noted for 
his trick plays, and he used them to win at least one ball game during the season of 1929. It was Coach McMillin's 
second year at Kansas State Agricultural college and although he did not win a majority of his games, he was 
admired by not only the members of his squad but by the student body as a whole. When "Bo" would talk 
at a pep meeting, there was complete silence. The former Ail-American from Centre College in Kentucky 
has won a host of friends since coming to Kansas State two years ago, and with the proper material will develop 
a winning ball team for the Wildcats. He regards his plavers as "boys" and treats them as his brothers, never 
having cruel words to say, but always talking to them in a way that shows he is there to teach, not to command. 
McMillin believes in football along with education and not' football alone, stressing scholarship among his 
athletes. With a somewhat lighter schedule next season than last year, the Wildcat eleven under Ciiach 
McMillin should have a better season, although the loss of several men will be felt. 




Page 51 




Maddox 
Myers 
Root 



Assistant Coackes 



HEAD coaches alone cannot develop athletic teams; they must have assistants to 
carry on the minor details or to coach other phases of the game. Assistants 
at the Kansas Aggies have given invaluable aid, and too much praise cannot come 
the way of those who are helping to mould the character and ability of the athletes 
who represent Kansas State. "Oss" Maddox, a protege of "Bo" McMillin at Geneva 
college, accompanied the Wildcat mentor to Manhattan and has served as line coach. 
He was one of the outstanding tackles in the east while playing under Coach 
McMillin at the Pennsylvania school. This was his second year here. Frank L. 
Myers, assistant to the director of athletics, has been in the department for a number 
of years. From 1920 to 1924 he was "Mike" Ahearn's secretary, and later coached 
for three years at Junction City high school. He returned to his duties here in 1927 
and has been assistant since that time. Frank P. Root, the "handy man" of the 
athletic department, has been an assistant coach in football and basketball since 
1923, and has charge of all athletic equipment. He is a former Aggie star, having 
played football and basketball at K. S. A. C. before the World War. C. S. Moll is 
here in his first year as coach of tennis and swimming. He is also an assistant in the 
department of physical education for men. L. P. Washburn, head of the department 
of physical education for men, and director of intramural athletics, has been at the 
college since 1926. A. A. "Doc" Holtz is a former Colgate football player. He has 
been an assistant freshman coach for several years, and has given much valuable help 
to the department. 



Moll 



W. 



Holtz 





Page BS 




A. H. Freeman 

Caphnn, 1919 



Alex Nigro 

Qipuiiii, mo 



- . Football 

A CAPABLE leader was at the helm of the McMillin machine in a majority of its conflicts last season in the 
person of Alva H. "Hoxie" Freeman, captain of the Kansas Aggie eleven, and an Aggie three sport man. 
A giant tackle, who possessed both size and ability, he was one of the outstanding linemen of the conference. 
Although the big leader was handicapped by a serious knee injury which kept him from a majority of the 
games, he was in the battle to his utmost while playing, and led the fighting Aggies on. Freeman, a three 
letterman in football, basketball, and baseball, has been one of the most outstanding athletes at Kansas State 
in several years. 

Leadership of the 1930 football team was placed in the hands of Alex Nigro, fleet foot;,! halfback and 
three sport man from Kansas City. The former Manual high school star and All-Kansas Citv high school back 
has been one of the formidable ball carriers of the conference f\)r two vears, anJ is also natcJ io'c his passing 
and receiving ability. Alex never lacks in spirit and is a natural leader. He is a star in three sports, football, 
basketball, and baseball. Captain-elect Nigro, like (Captain Freeman, was out of two conference games during 
the past season, but the games he pla\ed were a credit to his ahilit\-. Coach McMillin is oi the opinion rhar 
Nigro will make a capable leader for the J 930 gridiron squaJ. 



^^mm^^^^^mm^m^^ 



"m^^^mm^^s^mmm^ 



Page 5S 



Football 




Purdue 16 — Kansas Aggies 14 

TT N THEIR first game of the season, the Kansas Aggies learned 
^ that it was not yards gained that won football games, but 
total point advantage, for against the strong Purdue Boiler- 
makers, the Wildcats piled up 364 yards through passes and 
scrimmage to 304 for the Riveters, but lost by a count of 26 
to 14. But regarding the fact that Purdue went through the 
season undefeated and outside of Michigan, the Aggies scored 
the most number of points against them, the proteges of Coach 
McMillin showed the Phalanmen a good contest. It was the 
drives of Glen Harmeson, All-Big Ten back, that dealt the 
defeat, along with successful attacks by Purvis, Kissell, 
White and Yunevitch, sophomore Purdue backs. Purvis went 
over in the first period and Kissell went over twice in the 
second period, both of the latter being resultant of passes. 
A long pass, McMilhn to Hardtarfer for 55 yards put the ball 
on the one yard marker where Wiggins drove over for the 
first Aggie counter near the end of the second period. Tucker 
kicked the goal. Harmeson went over again for Purdue after 
passing the ball near the goal. In the final period, Alex 
Nigro broke loose for a 59 yard run which put the Aggies 
within scoring distance. A 15 yard pass to Daniels put the 
ball on the four yard line and Weller drove over the line for 
a touchdown. McMillin, Wiggins, and Nigro were backfield 
stars while Meyers was the strong point in the line. 



"Hoxie" Freeman 
Tackle, Captain 



Hank" Barre 

Center 



Barrel" Meyers 

Center 



Page B/, 



Football 



Texas Aggies ig===Kaiisas Aggies o 

SULTRY October day in Texas with a hot sun pourin 
down on their backs, along with an opponent that knew 
as much about this passing game as an army man does stories, 
served as good reasons for the Wildcats dropping their second 
game of the season to Coach Matty Bell's Texas Aggies at 
Dallas during the Texas state fair. Getting a psychological 
advantage by scoring a touchdown in the first four minutes 
of play, the Longhorn Aggies looked supreme. After receiv- 
ing a kick off, completing a long pass, and getting the benefit 
of a 15 yard penalty which brought the ball to the 1 yard line. 
Dansby drove over for a touchdown. The Texans held this 
lead and in the third quarter Captain Mills flipped a pass to 
Varnell for 49 yards and another six points. It was the clever 
running of Captain Mills and Zarafonetis that defeated the 
Wildcat eleven, along with their clever passing attack. 
Captain Mills reversed the field in the third quarter and ran 
through the entire Wildcat team for a touchdown. It was 
true that the Aggies had the tough breaks of the game and 
the climatic conditions were not too favorable, but the in- 
ability to block the passes of the Texas squad was the b 
difficulty. Yeager and Cronkite in the line and McMillin, 
Wiggins, Swartz, and Nigro in the backfield were the outstand- 
ing Aggie players in the Texas Aggie game. 



Ray McMillin 
Q_Ucirterback 

"Bob" Sanders 
Center 




Alex Nigro 
Halfback 



Football 




Kansas U, o-==Kansas Aggies 6 

ipLAYING probably the smartest football of the whole 
■^season, Coach McMillin's "boys" did the unexpected and 
triumphed over the rival University of Kansas team at 
Lawrence in the opening game of the Big Six conference by 
a score of 6 to 0. The game was played through a rain with 
Governor Reed as one of the witnesses of the state fued which 
went back to the Aggies after having been wrenched from 
their control a year before. An early Jayhawk drive was 
thwarted when the Aggie line braced when they were backed 
to the goal line. The winning touchdown came in the second 
period as a result of a cleverly maneuvered triple pass. Coach 
McMillin had spent much time on this trick play the week 
before and it proved to be the needed one. On the 45 yard 
line, Ray McMillin took the ball from center and faked toward 
the left side of the line, wheeled about tossing the ball to 
Nigro who was ten yards behind and to the left side of the 
field. Nigro carefully took the ball and gave it a mighty 
heave to Bill Towler who was going at top speed. The pass 
was for 50 yards and Towler carried the ball to the one yard 
line before being tackled. Wiggins drove through Bauman's 
guard for the touchdown. The trial for point failed, but it 
was not needed. Another K. U. drive headed by Jim Bausch 
was stopped in the closing minutes of play. 



Al" Tucker 

Tackle 



Adolph Hraba 
Guard 



Boots" Norton 

Center 




Pane r>6 



Football 



Oklahom.a 14 — Kansas Aggies 13 

ITH a 10,000 Homecoming and Diamond Jubilee crowd 
looking on and Captain Freeman and C. O. Tackwell 
witnessing the game from the bench with injuries, the Wild- 
cats dropped one of the most spectacular games of the season 
to the Oklahoma Sooners in the Memorial stadium by a count 
of 14 to 13- The loss was resultant of Sooner linemen coming 
through and blocking Tucker's kick for extra point after the 
first touchdown. The Sooners used straight football while 
the Aggies mixed passing with their football. The Wildcats 
gained 279 yards to 103 for the Sooners. The Aggies scored 
first when Wiggins drove over in the first period. Mills tied 
the count in the second period with a touchdown and Mayhew 
put them in a lead with a point kick. In the third period 
Churchill rushed Wiggins and knocked him down when he 
was passing, and recovered the ball on the 14 yard line where 
the Sooners made way for another touchdown. A pass to 
Price Swartz for 15 yards after which Swartz plunged the line 
for a foot brought the second Aggie counter. Cronkite passed 
to Meissinger for the extra point. The play of Bauman, acting 
captain for the Aggies, in the line, and of Wiggins, Nigro and 
McMillin on the offense were outstanding features along with 
the many thrills caused by the "Bo" McMillin passing game. 



"Bill" Daniels 

End 



Price Swartz 
End, Fullback 




"Pete" Fairbank 
End 



I'asjc .5," 



Football 




Missouri 6 — Kansas 



les 



7 



np HREE heroes, who gave all the credit to "the rest of the 
^ boys," were developed in the Wildcats 7 to 6 victory over 
the Missouri Tigers. The Aggies won the game for Alex Nigro 
who lay in a Columbia hospital with a leg infection. George 
Wiggins intercepted a pass and raced 85 yards to score the 
touchdown. C. O. Tackwell came from the plavers bench 
with a bad leg to kick the goal for the winning point. The 
Tigers outclassed the Aggies with exception of the final period 
when the Wildcats staged their spurt. The Missouri touch- 
down came in the second period when Gladden took a pass 
from Waldorf and ran 40 yards. Their try for point was wild. 
Late in the final period, George Wiggins, fatigued but willing, 
intercepted a pass and weaved his way behind excellent inter- 
ference across the goal line where he fell exhausted. Tackwell 
was ushered into the lineup and the giant lineman split the 
uprights with his kick for extra point and an Aggie victorv. 
The victory was of a small fighting team over an overconfident 
squad which thought that because dope pointed their way 
they should be victorious. Yeager and Bauman in the line 
were great defensive players, while Ray McMillin ran the 
Aggie team with much skill in the closing minutes of play. 



'Doc" Weller 
Halfback, Quarterback 



Jim" Yeager 
Guard, Tackle 



Ed McBurney 
Guard 




Football 



lo^wa State 2, — Kansas Aggies 3 

JUST three years ago, Iowa State defeated the Kansas Aggies 
by a score of 3 to 2 by scoring an intentional safety in the 
last of the final period. But this time it was the Kansas 
Aggies that won from the Cyclones by a 3 to 2 count and did 
this by the intentional safety route. The game was played 
through a drizzling rain and Coach McMillin put out only 
what was necessary to win, for Nebraska coaches and players 
were in the stands. Just before the second period closed, 
Coach McMillin called on C. O. Tackwell to kick a field goal. 
His drop-kick was from the 23 yard line where Auker and 
Weller had carried the ball by end runs and line plays. The 
Aggie coach was using his reserve backs in the game. The 
Wildcats continued on the defense throughout the remainder 
of the game which was rather slow because of the mud and 
cold weather. Holding the Iowa State team for downs, the 
Aggies would get the ball and Cronkite would kick it far 
down the field and again let the Cyclones be on the offense. 
In the last quarter, the Aggies were backed to the goal line 
and Evans was sent into the lineup as quarterback. The 
reserve signal caller hit the line twice and then scored an 
intentional safety to prevent the possibility of a punt being 
blocked behind the goal line and the Cyclones falling on it 
for a touchdown. 

George Wiggins 
Fullback 



Paul Brookover 

Tackle 




Frank Prentup 
Quarterback 



Page 5U 



Football 




Nebraska lo—Kansas Aggies 6 

ITN a game for the title of the Big Six conference, the Kansas 
-^ State Wildcats lost to a stronger and better Nebraska squad 
by a score of 10 to 6, but it can never be said that Bo McMillin's 
Aggies lost the championship because they did not fight. 
Nebraska was better, but the Aggies did not think so and set 
out to beat the Huskers and annex a title. It was this kind 
of spirit that McMillin instills into his football teams. Early 
in the first period, Nebraska scored two points on a safety 
when Ray Richards blocked one of Cronkite's kicks behind 
the goal line and fell on the ball. In the second period 
the Huskers obtained the ball and marched down the field 
where Young lashed the line for six inches and six points. 
Farley's try for point was wild. Coming back in the second 
period a revived eleven. Coach McMillin's Wildcats put up a 
stronger offense. A touchdown came as a result of two well 
executed forward passes. McMillin fllipped one to Towler 
for 20 yards to put the ball on the Husker 20 yard line. He 
let another fly to Nigro for 16 yards and then drove through 
the center of the line and crawled over the Husker goal line 
for a touchdown. Wiggin's try for point was blocked. 
Weller scored an intentional safety for the Huskers in the last 
period when the Aggies were backed to their goal line making 
the final score, Huskers 10 — Wildcats 6. 



Red" Schooley 
End 



"Casey" BauMAi 
Guard 



Duke" Errington 
Guard, Tackle 



Football 



Marquette 2,5 — Kansas Aggies 6 

As THE Kansas Aggie passes found excellent nestling places 
in the arms of Marquette backfield men, the Wildcats 
lost their last game of the 1929 season on Thanksgivmg day 
to the Golden Avalanche team at Milwaukee by a score of 
25 to 6. The Aggies were disheartened over their loss of the 
Big Six title and played the Marquette team in near zero 
weather. The Aggies battled with their backs to the wall in 
the first half but with Bauman and Wiggins stopping the 
Golden Avalanche backs in tight places, they did not score 
in the first period. Sisk took Tackwell's kickolT in the second 
half, ran for the other side of the field and sidestepped tackier 
after tackier to run 75 yards for a touchdown. Later in the 
same period, Sisk intercepted McMillin's pass on the 50 yard 
line and raced half the length of the field for another counter. 
The Aggies received and penetrated Marquette territory only 
to have Klausc intercept a McMillin pass on his 25 yard line 
and race 75 yards for a touchdown. Corbett was the next to 
intercept an Aggie pass, only he chose a shorter distance to 
run, and galloped but 35 yards for a touchdown. The Aggies 
only touchdown came in the closing minutes of play when 
Auker flipped a pass to Evans on the 35 yard line and the 
midget quarterback raced 35 yards for the counter. Auker's 
kick was low and the Wildcats dropped the closing battle 
25 to 6. ^ ^ _ 



Bill" Towler 
End 



Hank" Cronkite 
Tackle, End 



LUD FlSER 

Halfback 





Football 



A LTHOUGH the Kansas Aggie football team did not have 
^^ such an eventful season, it was feared by nearly every 
eleven that faced it. In opening the season against the Purdue 
Boilermakers, the Aggies scored 14 points which was the 
second highest number scored against the Riveters in the 
season. Purdue was undefeated and rated as one of the strong 
contenders as national champions. The other non-conference 
games were with strong opponents, and although the Aggies 
did not mark up a non-conference victory, they made a good 
showing wherever they went by their clever football tactics 
drilled in them by "Bo" McMillin. The former Ail-American 
quarterback put on the field for Kansas State last season one 
of the cleverest football teams that ever played in the purple 
jersies. "Bo" was not only a football coach but a psychol- 
ogist. His players played for him along with playing for the 
love of the game and for their school. He was recognized 
among other coaches as being clever and always ready to 
present a new trick play which he hoped might mean victory. 
Such plays made the Aggie team colorful and brought crowds 
to see them in action against a foe, even though the foe may 
be superior on paper. The Aggies outgained nearly every 
team throughout the season. 



"Bo" McMillin 
Head Coach 



Bill" Meissinger 
Halfback 



Steve" Stephenson 
Tackle 




Football 



SEVERAL of the Kansas Aggie players drew recognition 
on mythical selections rating from All-American to all- 
state. Of these men, probably "Casey" Bauman and C. O. 
Tackwell drew the most honorary fame. The two veteran 
Aggie guards were rated in the conference and mid-west 
papers as outstanding and in order to put them both on many 
elevens, Tackwell was shifted to a tackle. Bauman acted 
captain throughout the games in which Captain Freeman was 
unable to play and ran the team well besides being a tower 
of strength on the defense. The play of George Wiggins, 
sophomore fullback, on both offense and defense, drew con- 
siderable comment from the press throughout the circuit. 
Alex Nigro, because of his clever running attacks, and Ray 
McMillin, because of his ability to run the team and to toss 
accurate passes, also drew recognition. Henry Cronkite, 
elongated sophomore tackle and end, was praised by many 
for his kicking ability, especially for his knack of kicking 
them out of bounds near the goal line, thus preventing a 
run-back by the opponents. Bill Towler, Captain Freeman, 
Price Swartz and others also were recognized by the press in 
the selection of mythical teams and honorary rolls for the 
1929 season. 



'Oss" Maddox 

Line Coach 



"Tack" Tackwell 

Tackle, Guard 




Pag* 83 



Football 



GROOMED by Head Coach Ward Haylett, 
and assisted by "Chili" Cochrane and 
"Doc" Holtz, a good freshman football squad 
was produced last fall at the Kansas Aggies. 
The team of men eligible played two games, 
dropping one to Kansas by a count of 39 to 7 
and winning from the Creighton yearlings 12 to 
0. The only Aggie touchdown at Kansas was 
the result of a 70 yard run by Jack Going. 
Zeckser and J. Woodyard made the Aggie 
touchdowns, and Morgan at end. Walker in 
the backheld, and Smelser at guard were out- 
standing. At the bottom is pictured the frosh 
squad. Numerals were awarded to G. H. 
Brummer, D. C. Barnett, D. F. Beach, F. A. 
Cain, L. H. Dalton, E. C. Daniels, B. J. Deters, 
O. H. Dilsaver, R. E. Eberle, C. E. Emel, ]. 
Gomg, R. H. Gump, G. R. Harsh, H. L. 
Hasler, R. B. Helmmg, G. W. Hawks, J. C. 
Hofsess, J. P. Kesler, R. A. Lang, R. F. Lang, 
N. C. Lewis, R. E. Marken, L. W. Michael, 
L. Morgan, E. F. Morrison, J. Rever, A. C. 
Reicherter, A. H. Ryon, L. L. Smelser, L. J. 
Schuke, R. C. Smith, O. Snvder, C. R. Socol- 
ofsky, K. A. Walker, L. C. Woodyard, J. C. 
Woodyard, W. Zeckser, F. E. Davidson. Lyle 
Smelser, Manhattan, was named honorary 
captain at the close of the season. 



B 











^^^c #. 








Football 



TN THE most thrilling campaign for a football title 
^ ever staged in the Big Six conference, there were 
players from all of the schools that were entitled to 
mention for mythical teams. Some were left off because 
they did not play enough games because of injuries. 
Following is a mythical team selected by the coaches and 
officials of the conference and printed in the Kansas City 
Star. It may be recognized as much official as any other 
named. Pictured in the center panel from top to bottom 
are: "Jim" Bausch, driving 200 pound fullback from 
Kansas; Orin Tackwell, tackle and kicker from Kansas 
State; "Casey" Bauman, great defensive K-Aggie guard; 
"Giant" Richards, outstanding Husker tackle; Sloan, 
Nebraska backfield ace. Above the panel is Crider, 
Oklahoma, carrying the ball, and Herb Brayton, 
Missouri guard. Below at the top is "Smilin' Tom" 
Churchill, versatile end of the Sooners; John Waldorf, 
Missouri captain and back; Smith, Missouri center; and 
Hursley, Missouri end. Other Aggies to make second or 
third elevens on this pick were 
Wiggins, Cronkite, and Nigro. 




Pao» 85 



Activities 




)Kt ,C 




"Chick" Allison, Head Cheerleader 

Curtis Chilcott Pfuetze Allison Wfsij-rman Dai^ton Pace 



Clieerleadlers 



npHE job of the Kansas State cheerleaders was made relatively easy during the 1929-30 season, due to the 
fact that the student body displayed the best school spirit in years. The pep meetings were attended by huge 
crowds, the cheering at games was very good, and the returning Aggie teams were met by large numbers of 
students at the railroad stations. 

"Chick" Allison was head cheerleader for the second year. He was assisted by Karl H. Pfuetze, Manhattan, 
who served his second year as varsity cheerleader; Paul Westerman, Wamego, who finished his third year as 
varsity man, and E. D. Chilcott, a sophomore from Manhattan with one year of experience. 

Freshmen who were successful in the tryouts for cheerleaders were: W. E. Curtis, Wichita; S. G. Dalton, 
Dodge City; and G. W. Page, Norton. 

Allison and Pfuetze graduated this spring, and therefore will not return. Chilcott, Westerman, Dalton, 
and Page will be back next September to cheer Aggie teams on to victory. 



'm^mmm^mmst?mif^^\ 



Activities. 



Men's ^^K'' Fraternity 



npHE Men's "K" Fraternity was organized to proniote clean athletics and good sportsmanship in all athletic 
competition in which Kansas State is a participant. The fraternity is composed of men who have earned a letter 

Motto — Fight 



or letters in a major intercollegiate sport. It was founded at this college in 1913- 
Colors — Royal Purple and White 



Insignia — Official athletic "K' 



"Hoxie" Freeman 
"Hank " Barre 



OFFICERS 



President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



H. R. Abernathy 
Glenn Aikins 
S. E. Alsop 

E. L. AUKER 

K. L. Bachus 
B. W. Barber 
H.J. Barre 
K. C. Bauman 
E. H. Bredehoft 
A. D. Buckmaster 
J. C. Carter 
W. Chapman 
O. Cochrane 
J. R. Coleman 
H. O. Cronkite 
W. W. Daniels 

H. A. DiMMITT 

T. E. Doyle 



M. Ehrlich 
C. H. Errintgton 
T. M. Evans 
P. E. Fairbank 
E. E. Feathers 
J. Fickel 
L. C. Fiser 
M. F. Fockele 
W. A. Forsberg 
A. H. Freeman 
T. H. Gile 
A. R. Hraba 
C. M. KoPF 
A. Lambertson 
K. J. Latimer 
E. C. Livingston 
G. W. Long 
H. D. LoTT 



Ed McBurney 

R. H. McCoLLUM 
R. H. McKlBBEN 
R.J. McMlLLIN 

W. H. Meissinger 
A. M. Meyers 
H. S. Miller 
L. B. Nash 
Alex Nigro 
C. E. Nutter 
R. Patterson 
W. E. Platt 
F. B. Prentup 
C. D. Richardson 
C. M. Rhoades 
Ray Russell 
R. C. Sanders 
R. E. Sanders 



K. J. Silverwood 
E. G. Skeen 
A. H. Stephenson 
P. K. Swartz 
C. O. Tackwell 

L. TOADVINE 
W. H. TOWLER 

R. F. VoHS 
O. H. Walker 
J. R. Warner 
H. R. Weller 
H. E. West 
G. S. Wiggins 

T. F. WiNBURN 

J.J. Ye.^ger 




VOH.S, RiCI lA 

N'ic;ro, Gm I 
Lott, Mf.i.ss 

PAiriiKSON, 



Page 67 



Activities 




Sibling. I reaster. Brdner, Kindig. Jones, Schultz, Paulsen, Washington 
Resch, Tietze, Makins, Price, Smith, Thomas. Williams, Blair 
Burghart, Hostetler. Rhoades. Bowman. Elwell, Miller Hamilton, Gel 



Pi Epsilon Pi 

National Men's Pep Organization — Wampus Cat Chapter 



OFFICERS 

A. A. Hostetler __----_- President 

M. Makins --------- Vice-President 

C. M. Rhoades --------- Secretary 

G. L. Blair --------- Treasurer 



Acacia 


Bera Pi Epsilon 


Kappa Sigma 


Phi Kappa 


Pi Kappa Alpha 


M. J. Kindig 


H. Geiman 


C. M. Rhoades 


M. F. Makins 


G. L. Blair 


E. E. Jones 


M. G. Ott 


D. H. Sibling 


J. Shiltz 


E. D. Blackburn 


Alpha Gamma Rho 


Beta Theta Pi 








A. W. Crawford 


H. E. Miller 


Lambda Chi Alpha 


Phi Kappa Tan 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon 


C. Williams 


A. P. Shelly 


L. G. Hamilton 


L. |. Burghart 


A. A. Hostetler 






T. M. Heter 


H.'A. Elwell 


G. Washington 


Alpha Rho Chi 


Delta Sigma Phi 








C. R. Crossen 


G. W. Young 








R. A. ScHOBER 


T. E. Bowman 


Omega Tan Epsilou 


Phi Lambda Theta 


Sigma Nil 


Alpha Sigma P.si 


Delta Tail Delta 
C. Hamilton 


S. Burton 

W. L. Treaster 


M. B. AiNSWORTH 

H. L. Fry 


]. W. Pratt 
P. L. Manley 


G. H. Jenkins 


J. H. Tietze 








E. L. Brower 












Farm House 


Phi Delta Theta 


Fhi Sigma Kappa 


Sigma Phi Epsihm 


Alpha Tau Omt;^a 


E. S. ScilULTZ 


W. B. Kinnamon 


H.T. Hyde 


H. H. Bruner 


E. A. Thomas 


H. A. Paulsen 


D. E. Price 


WE. Russell 


N. F. Resch 



Page 68 



Niinor Sports 



Cross Country 



INNING every dual meet throughout the season and placing third in the conference mset at Lincoln, 
the Kansas Aggie cross country team had a very successful season. With four lettermen back and several 
promising sophomores, Coach Ward Haylett and assistant coach T. F. Winburn, developed one of the outstanding 
teams of the conference. Because a majority of his time was spent with freshman football. Coach Haylett turned 
most of the cross country duties over to "Nurmi" Winburn, former cross country star and track captain. In 
the first meet of the season, a triangular affair against Oklahoma university and the Oklahoma Aggies, the 
Aggies finished first with 29 points, Oklahoma Aggies second with 45 points and the university third with 
46 points. Captain H. S. Miller of the Aggies was first, finishing the five miles in 26 minutes, 11 seconds. 
Jenkins of Oklahoma Aggies was second, Dawson of the university was third, Toadvine of the Aggies fourth, 
Hoyne of the Aggies sixth, and Carter and Gile of the Aggies tied for eighth. At Missouri, all six of the 
Wildcat runners finished ahead of any Missouri runner, winning by a score of 16 to 43. Miller, Backus, and 
Toadvine tied for first, Carter and Hoyne tied for fourth and Gile was sixth. The time was rather slow as the 
leading runners waited for the remainder of the team. The Kansas Aggies won a close dual from Iowa State 
here. Putnam of Iowa State won the race but Aggies finished well enough up to get the meet. Oklahoma 
won the conference meet held at Lincoln and Kansas finished second. The Aggies were third in the meet. 
Dawson of Oklahoma established a record of 23 minutes, 57 seconds in the five miles which is a new world's 
record if accepted. Putnam of Iowa State was second; Moore, Oklahoma, third; Toadvine, Aggies, fourth; 
Fortune, Kansas, fifth; Hinshaw, Kansas, sixth; Griffith, Nebraska, seventh; Miller, Aggies, eighth; Backus, 
Aggies, thirteenth; Carter, Aggies, twentieth; Gile, Aggies, twenty-eighth. Captain Miller was out of 
condition for the race, having spent the week before in the hospital because of illness. 

Lettermen in cross country were, K. L. Backus, Osawatomie; John Carter, Bradford; Henrv Gile, Scandia; 
John Hoyne, Salina, H. S. Miller, Kansas City, and Lee Toadvine, Dighton. 



^ ■ ^^^j^^E^^i^^cy^^^ 









Page 60 



Minor Sports 





Fall Intramurals 



TNTRAMURAL athletics has gained 
^ a big hold on the male student body 
of Kansas State, with 1,618 or 85 per- 
cent of the men students participating 
in the various sports last season. This 
is a very large percentage, and each year 
it is growing larger. In the fall, soccer, 
horseshoe pitching, cross country and 
basketball are the sports. Lambda Chi 
Alpha was the winner of the huge intra- 
mural challange trophy last year with 
a total of 1,418 points. Delta Tau 
Delta, defending champion, was forced 
to take second with 1,126 points. Other 
high point scorers were Phi Kappa Tau 
1,023, Omega Tau Epsilon, 875, and 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 836. Starting this 
fall, Sigma Nu opened the first team 
sport with a victory in the soccer 
tourney, wrenching the championship 
from Delta Sigma Phi, winners for three 
successive vears. The final game was 
between the Sigma Nu and Phi Kappa 
Tau organizations with the Sigma Nus 
winning 2 to 1 on Jack Going's two 
goals. Members of the team were 
McCollum, Condell, Going, Haws, 
Grigg, Bickle, Johnston, Philip, Evans, 
Harsh and Hasler. Competition was 
very strong throughout the fall and 
many tie games were played by the 
more than 20 teams entering the meet. 




Niinor Sports 



PHI LAMBDA THETA repeated in 
the winning of the championship 
in cross country. Alpha Gamma Rho 
was the runner-up in team points. 
Members of the Phi Lambda Theta 
team were C. Collins, R. Patterson, 
L. Schwanke, O. Leasure and M. 
George. William Steps, an inde- 
pendent, ran the three miles in 16 
minutes and 27 seconds to win the 
race while Pierce, another inde- 
pendent finished a close second. J. 
Foster, Phi Kappa, was third; Harold 
Richardson, Sigma Phi Sigma, ranked 
fourth, and Wally Forsberg, Sigma 
Nu, was fifth. R. B. Smith, Lambda 
Chi Alpha, won the singles in horse- 
shoes for the second straight season 
and teamed with R. W. James won 
the doubles tourney. B. R. Christie, 
independent, was the singles runner- 
up and R. Patterson and S. Roehr- 
man. Phi Lambda Theta, were doubles 
runners-up. In the basketball tourney. 
Delta Tau Delta won both the intra- 
mural and panhellenic champion- 
ships. In the intramural finals they 
defeated the Aggie Knights 26 to 21. 
Sigma Nu was runner-up in the pan- 
hellenic race. 



Fall Intramurals 




Activities 




Bland, Zeli.er, Florence, McCutcheon, Halstead, McKenzie. Lamb, Ansdell, Wagstaff, Silkenson, Morgan, Lacey, Esxeldson 
MuNDELL. Nelson, Peterson, Nelsom, Reed, Jennings. Tolin, Lamprecht, Wacar, Van Pelt, Lyles, King 
Walker, Stafford, Johnston, Koons, Ross, Elder, Burson, Costello, Gordon, Dodge, West 
Wyant, Tyrfe, King, Skillin. Hay, Wickham, Rasher, Pollock, Morehouse, Read 
HixsoN, Hobson, Andres, Pacey, Samuel, Pyle- Hawley, Wright, Smerchek 

Miss Patterson 



npHE purpose of the women's athletic association is to furnish opportunity and rewards for athletic recre- 
ational activity. This organization is open to any woman student who has made 100 points by participation 
in some sport. Any member of W. A. A. is eligible for Purple Pepsters, the girl's pep organization. By making 
1200 points through participation in sports a K sweater may be earned. 






Page 7i 



Wo?ne?i's Athletics 



npHE W. A. A. Council is responsible for the promotion and organization of the Women's Athletic Association. 
Its purpose is to interest all of the women on the campus in some athletic activity, that thev may discover the 
joys and benefits to be derived from wholesome, invigorating, outdoor sport. The creed of fine sportsmanship, 
good leadership, and good fellowship makes possible the transformation of high ideals into action. 



Grace Editha Reed 
Ruby Nelson - 
Helen K. Wyant 



OFFICERS 



Vice-President 
Secretary 
Rachel Lamprecht 



Helen Van Pelt 
Zada McCutcheon 
Mildreh Osborn 

Publicity Miiii.igc 



Trn/umr 
Marshall 
Initiation Director 



SPORT MANAGERS 



Leone Pacey - 
Flora Ross 
Faith Briscoe 
Norma Koons - 
Geraldine Johnston 
Mina Mae Skillin - 
Ruth Thomas 



Hockey 

Baseball 

Swimming 

Volley Ball 

Tennis 

Track and Field 

Archery 



Helen Laura Dodge 
Pauline Samuel - 
Mary Bell Read 
Leone Wilson 
Adelaide Scott 
Mildred Purcell 
Effie Rasher 



Hiking 

Assistant Hiking 

Dancin!^ 

Rife Firing 

Hars:shoes 

Pi/'- pie Pepsters 

Basketball 



Dodge 

Johnston 



KoONS 

Lamprecht 

McCuTCHEON 



Nelson 
Purcell 
Read 
Reed 
Ross 



Samuel 
Skillin 
Rasher 
Van Pelt 



Wilson 
Whitten 
Wyant 




Page 73 



Women's Athletic. 




SpARR, Nelson, Purcell, McCutcheon, Kimball, Van Pelt, Reed. Nickels 
Johnston, Walker, King, Remick. Kingsbury, Rasher, Koons, Dodge. Walker 
Leighton, Samuel, Wilson. Ross, "Bo Peep," Jones Teter, Skillin Shenkel 



Purple Pepsters 

Purple Pepsters is the girl's pep club of the Kansas State Agricultural College. 



Mildred Purcell ------- President 

Pauline Samuel -------- Vice-President 

Helen Van Pelt ------- Secretary-Treasurer 

"Bo Peep" McMillin ------- Mascot 



Helen Laura Dodge 
Geraldine Johnston 
Patty Kimball 
Venice King 
Norma Koons 
Eugenia Leighton 
Ruby Nelson 
Mildred Osborn 
Mildred Purcell 
Effie Rasher 
Grace Editha Reed 
Flora Ross 
Pauline Samuel 
MiNA Skillin 
Cleo Teter 



Helen Van Pelt 
Vera Walker 
Vesta Walker 
Leone Wilson 
Estella Shenkel 
Josephine Young 
Barbara Jean Pollock 
Charlotte Remick 
Frances Jones 
Jane Sparr 
Mildred Kingsbury 
Vivian Nickels 
Zada McCutcheon 
Alice Irwin 
Esther Hodson 



mm^m^mi^^^^g^^M 



w^^mmwm^^^^mmi 



Pane 7!t 



Women's Athletics 

Women's ^^K'' Fraternity 

npHE purpose of the Women's "K" Fraternity is to promote good sportsmanship in women's athletics. A "K" 
sweater is the award given by W. A. A. to the girl who has made 1200 points. A chevron is given for each 
additional 200 points and in place of the fourth chevron a star is awarded. A girl must be proficient in nearly every 
sport to amass sufficient points for a sweater. 

OFFICERS 

Helen Van Pelt ----._. President 

Mary Bell Read ------- Vice-President 

Ruby Nelson -----___ Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

WiLMA Jennings Grace Editha Reed 

Geraldine Johnston Adelaide Scott 

Ruby Nelson Mina Skillin 

Helen Van Pelt Martha Smith 

Effie Rasher Frances Wagar 

Mary Bell Read Leone Wilson 



johnston 
Nelson 
Rasher 
Reed 



Scott 

Skillin 
Smith 



Van Pelt 
Wac.ar 
Wilson 




Pago 75 



Women's Athletics 




Anions the- activities of tiic women's athletic dcparrnicnt 
is tlic or^'anization which gives its time to the study and 
promotion of interpretive dancing, Orchesis. These scenes 
were taken in the formal garden near the hort building. 
Members are: Velma Allen, Juliana Amos, Loraine Barrett, 
Maxine Hawley, Una Irwin, Mary Bell Read, Pauline Samuel. 
Helen K. Wyant, and Jo Young. 



Women's Athletic:, 




jo T ()iiN(, and LoiiAiNE HAKiiiiiT pose in their Fri\'ol costume 
while the Baby Sister Blues chorus looks poutv. The Pi 1 
swiiiiniing team gets ready for a dip, and the championship 
Alpha Delt basketball team doesn't care one bit. The varsitv 
basketball team looks for more worlds to conquer, as do 
Pirates of Frivol. The Golfer Chorus ol Frivol lust linishcd 
turning in a low score. 



Women's Athletic^ 




InstniLtors in the women's department of physical education 
pose for the camerman. They are: Katherine Geyer, Rachel 
Morrow, Bernice Patterson, and Helen Saum Other pictures 
were taken during interesting moments of the K Fraternity 
picnic. Several of the girls try a little horse back riding, and 
Hoxie and Mildred Huddleston devour their share of the food. 



Page 78 



Fraternities 



Senior Men's Panhellenic 



Acacia 

M. J. KiNDIG 

Alpha Gamma Rho 
Andy Crawford 

Alpha Rho Chi 
Carl Ossmann 

Alpha Tau Omega 
E. E. RippEY 

Beta Theta Pi 

Harry O. Fuaziei 

Delta Sigma Phi 
V. S. Peterson 

Delta Tau Delta 
Phil Andrew 

Farm House 

Harry Paulsen 

Kappa Sigma 
C. M. Rhoades 



Lambda Chi Alpha 
Edris Rector 

Phi Delta Theta 
W. B. Kinnamon 

Phi Kappa 

Ed O. Hadiger 

Phi Kappa Tau 
C. L. Brainard 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
W. E. Russell 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
G. G. Biles 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Major Bliss 

Sigma Nu 
J. W. Pratt 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
E. W. Smith 



KiNDIG 

Crawford 

OsSMAN 
RlPPEY 



Frazier 
Andrew 
Peterson 
Paulsen 



Habiger 
Brainard 
Russell 
Rhoades 



Rector 
Bliss 
Smith 
Prai 




^%3l 



Page 79 



Fraternitie: 





▲^4nJr^^^4iL 



%1^M 






^MdrM^. 




d. ^1.12 



^L^kkkm 



Smith 

Williams 
Reed 
Criner 
Sparks 
Wood 

Crans 
Lodge 
Kesler 
Skinner 
Fox 

McCandless 

McCord 
Peterson 
coolbaugh 
Kimball 
Hume 
Price 



Curtis 
Kern 

Sullivan 
Rychel 
Reinecke 

Vesecky 
Rayburn 
schwindler 
Benner 
Johnson 



BiCKEL 

Lantz 
Besler 

GWINN 



Freshmen Men's Panhellenic 



Acacia 


Befa Theta Pi 


Lambda Chi Alpha 


Phi Sigma Kappa 


Bruce Smith 


E. F. Wood 


J. Kimball 


John Reinecke 


Carol Manda 


Kenneth Foote 


B. D. COOLDAUGH 


S. Vesecky 




Delta Sigma Phi 




Pi Kappa Alpha 


Alpha Gamma Rho 


Urban Lodge 


Phi Delta Theta 


R. W. ScHWINDLER 


Wm. Snodgrass 


E. R. Crans 


H. Price 


James Rayburn 


P. Williams 


Delta Tail Delta 


W. Hume 


Sigma Alpha Ep si Ion 




Theo. Skinner 




J. T. Johnson 


Alpha Rho Chi 


Joel Kesler 


Phi Kappa 


E. Benner 


A. T. Reed 
Geo. Erdtmann 


¥ay))i House 
G. Fox 


W. E. Curtis 
Ed Sullivan 


Sigma Nu 

R. A. BiCKEL 




T. McCandless 




B. R. Lantz 


Alpha Ta„ Omega 


Kappa Sigma 


Phi Kappa Tau 


Sigma Phi EpsiloH 


E. E. Criner 


E. Peterson 


Frank Brandenburg 


Robert Besler 


Reuden Sparks 


Hal McCord, Jr. 


Robert Rychel 


Frank Gwinn 




wmm^m^m^m^mM^k^smam 


-^^^^^mm^M^^^m^mi 




Pane SO 







Fraternities 



Fraternity Housemothers 



Acacia 

Mrs. Ella Lyles 

Alpha Gamtna Kho 
Mrs. M. L. Manley 

Alpha Rho Ch; 

Mrs. L. WlNGFIELD 

Alpha Sie^ma P.il 
Mrs. J. A. Jackson 

Alpha Tat/ Omega 
Mrs. Inez P. Ross 

Beta Pi Ep.ulon 

Mrs. Rose Cassidy 

Baa Thera Pi 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sheetz 

Delta /V/c Omega 
Mrs. J. a. Segrjst 



Delta Sigma Phi 

Miss Nina Crawford 

Delta Tau Delta 

Mrs. M. H. Foreman 

Fam House 

Mrs. Anna O'Maliey 

Kappa Sigma 

Mrs. J. W. Amis 

LamhJa Chi Alpha 

Mrs. Ehie Hawthorne 

Omega Tan Epsiluii 
Mrs. N. C. Keel 

Phi Delta Theta 

Mrs. R. G. Taylor 

Phi Kappa 
Mrs. Margaret Houston 



Phi Kappa Tan 
Mrs. Lui.a M. Roark 

Phi Lambda Theta 
Mrs. C. C. Heer 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
Mrs. E. L. Taylor 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Mrs. Fanny McAdams 

Sigma Alpha Epulon 
Mrs. Emma Pasmore 

Sigma N.v 

Mrs. F. W. Norris 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Mrs J. D. Ritchey 

Sigma Phi Sigma 
Mrs. Anna Bitzer 



Mrs. Lyles 
Mrs. Manley 

Mrs. WlNGFIELD 

Mrs. Jackson 
Mrs. Ross 
Mrs. Cassidy 



Mrs. Sheetz 
Mrs. Segrist 
Miss Crawford 
Mrs. Foreman 
Mrs. O'Malley 
Mrs. Amis 



Mrs. Hawthorne 
Mrs. Keel 

Mrs. R. G. Taylo 
Mrs. Houston 
Mrs. Roark 
Mrs. Heer 



Mrs. E. L. Taylor 
Mrs. McAdams 
Mrs. Pasmore 
Mrs. Norris 
Mrs. Ritchey 
Mrs. BnziiR 




Page SI 



Fraternittes 



Anderson 
Boles 
Brandon 
Caughron 
Coble 



De Vries 
Doyle 
Enochs 
Fauchier 
Garner 







Geer 
Haas 













2S 



Hick 
Johnston 



Jones 
Kent 

KiNDIG 

Leasure 
Logan 



Magaw 
Manda 
Martz 
Moore 
Poole 



Price 
Record 
Schneider 
Smith 



Stapleton 
Sturdevant 
Walter 

Williamson ^^ '^C^ftl ^^ gk. J ^bL WW^i ^^ W^ :>ta /'^^^ 



Ptti/e S« 



^ '^ 9 





S5 






9 



Fraternities 




Founded at the University of Michigan, 1904 
Kansas State chapter established December 6, 1913 



Flower — Acacia 



Colors — Black and Gold 




MEMBERS 



L. K. Anderson "33, Cleburne 

R. A. Boles '32, Liberal 

O. K. Brandon '31, Ash Valley 

R. Caucihron '30, Manhattan 

M. Coble '30, Sedgwick 

R. Crouch '32, Herington 

T. M. De Vries '30, Orange City, la. 

T. E. Doyle '31, Manhattan 

D. R. Enochs '33, Randolph 

E. E. Fauchier '30, Osage City 
G. Garner '33, Hiawatha 
Bartlett Geer '31, Auburn 



C. W. Haas '30, Winlicld 

K. M. Hall '30, Agra 

T. W. Hicks '30, Norton 

E. D. Johnston '31, Pomona 

E. E. Jones '32, Barry, 111. 

H. L. Kent, Grad., State College, 

M.J. KiNDio '30, Olathe 

T.J. Leasure '30, Solomon 

C. C. Logan '32, Quenenio 

M. L. Mac.aw '30, Ames 

C. W. Manda '32, Hodge City 



R. M. Martz '32, Liberal 
V. H. Meseke '31, Manh.ur.in 
H. I. Moore '33, Wakarus.i 
W. Poole '33. Oil Hill 
C. ). Price '31, Osage Citv 
CM. Record '33, Humboldt 
E. H. Schneider '30, Kansas Cit 
W. B. Smith '32, Hoisington 
H. N. Stapleton '30, Jewell 

H. L. STURDEVANr '32, Cliaiiutc 

H. B. Walter 'M, W kIuci 

H. Williamson, (.li.id , M.inli.itc 



Page 83 



Fraternities 



Alexander 
Alsop 
Bond 
Bradley 
Braun 
Carter 



Clair 
Conger 
Crawford 

Elling 
Firth 
Green 



Gugler 

HUBBELL 

Isaac 

KOHRS 

McLean 

Minor 



MUNSON, G. 
MUNSON, R. 
MURRELL 

Myers 
Ogan 
Painter 



Patton 
Peck 

Quantic 
Rees 

Regnier 
Schlehuber 



Smerchek 
Swelling 
Snodgrass 
Stoneking 
Terrell 
Trompeter 



Van Meveren 
Wier 

Williams, C. 
Williams, P. 
Wilson 
Wismer 




Page Si 



Fraternities 




la Gamma 



o 



Founded at the University of Illinois, 1908 
Alpha Zeta chapter established February 12, 1927 



Flower — Pink Rose 




Colors — Dark Green ami Gold 



MEMBERS 



R. H. Alexander '30, Harlan, Iowa 

S. E. Alsop '31, Wakefield 

T. L. Bond '33, Cumberland, Iowa 

H. R. Bradley '30, Kidder, Mo. 

R. F. Brannan '30, Meade 

W.J. Braun '30, Council Grove 

[. C. Carter '32, Bradford 

J. E. Clair '30, Mendon, III, 

C. C. Conger '3]; lola 

Andy Crawford '30, Ashland, Miss. 

Carl Elling '32, Lawton, Okla. 

L. K. FiRTii '32, Cowgill, Mo. 

j. H. Greene '30, Beverley 

L. O. GuGi.ER '32, Woodbine 

|. L. Hakl '32, Stanton, Nebr. 

'W. S. HoRNsiiY '32, MilHnuton, Tcnn 



G. L. Hubdell '33, Spearville 
G. C. Isaac '30, Baldwin 

B. C. KoHRS '32, Abilene 
R. T. McLean '33, Ottawa 
W. M. Meyers '32, Bancroft 
J. L. Minor '30, Syracuse 

G. R. MuNsoN '32, junction City 
R. C. MuNsoN '32, Junction City 

C. A. MuRRRLL '32, Hopewell 
C. F. OoAN '33, Madison, Nebr. 
W. H. Painter '30, Meade 

G. F. Patton '32, Cawker City 
L. A. Peck '31, Soldier 
G. S. QuANTic '30, Riley 
Leonard Rees '32, Abilene 
blMu. RicGNiHu '32, Spearville 



J. L. Reineccius '33, Creston, Nebr. 

A. M. Schlehuber '31, Durham 

Lloyd Schulze '33, Norton 

|. D. Smerchek '32, Garnett 

'R. O. Snelling '32, West Point, Ini 

W. B. Snodorass '33, Anchorage, .^ 

E. L. Ston eking '32, Baldwin 

J. A. Terrell '30, S\racuse 

R. H. Trompeter '30, Horton 

A. F. Van Meveren '32, Orange (jn 

E. L. WiER '31, Blue Mound 

Carl Williams '31, Dodi;e Cit\ 

Pnnip Willi VMS '33, Dodyc Citv 

\\\ G WiisoN -^V Lincoln 

(',, ;\, W'lSMi R "^1, Pomona 

Paul Zimmik '^V \\^.\ii^ Citv 



Fraternities 



Carlgren 
Crossen 

DlLSAVER 



Ekdahl 
Erdtmann 
Freeman 




^.1iM 



Hartman 

HOUCK 

Hull 
Jelinek 



Joerg 

LOCKARD 

Martin 

OsSMAN 



Prouty 
Reed, A. 
Reed, E. 



Rinard 

SCHOBER 

Smith 



Walker 

Wortiiington 




Page S6 



Fraternities 




la 



lO 



Founded at the University of Illinois, 1914 
Paeonios chapter established February 10, 1923 



Flower — White Rose 



Colors — Maroon and Blue 




H. W. Baker '30, Lyndon 
C. O. Carlgren '33, Scandia 
G. R. Crossen '30, Turner 
O. H. DiLSAVER '33, Kensington 
O. S. Ekdahl '32, Manhattan 
G. E. Erdtmann '33, Ellsvvortli 
A. H. Freeman '30, Manhattan 
H. H. Gregory '31, Ellsworth 
F. M. Hartman '31, Manhattan 



D. C. Houck '31, Americus 

B. H. Hull '33, Concordia 
Geo. Jelinek '30, Ellsworth 
Mason Joero '32, Randall 
M. Lesher '32, Manhattan 
R. I. Lockard '30, Norton 
H. E. Martin '31, Eskridge 

C. G. OssM AN '32, Concordia 
W. H. PiPKR '32, Fort Scott 



A. L. Prouty '33, Newton 
A. L. Reed '31, Cassoda\- 
E. E. Reed '33, Smith Center 
C. A. RiNARD '31, Salina 
R. A. ScHonER '32, Manhattan 
C. R. Smith '33. McPherson 
C. W. Van Vranken '33, Pratt 
P B Wmkir '33, Wichita 
W. W'onniiNi.roN '31, Turner 



Fraternities 



Allen 

Anderson 
Ayers 
Bailey 
Barkley 



JORECKY 

Caldwell 

Comfort 

Earle 

Gingrich 



Greep 
Holmes 
Hood 




^ '^^ 9 ^ ^ 



)ONES 

Kemper 



McGlNNIS 
McKlNNIE 

Moore 
Perkins 
Reiswig 




Schreiner 
Storz 

SWENSON 

Tessendorf 
Turner 



WlXKEL 

WoODVARD, L, 
WRKillT 

Yenzer 







Paae ss 



Fraternities 



tfi 





JOk 






Founded at K. S. A. C. April 5, 1912 
Flower — Ked Carnation Colors— OA/ Gold and Blue 




M. W. Allen '32, Manhattan 
R. L. Andeuson '31, Dodge City 
F. E. Ayers '33, Estancia, N. M. 
M. A. Bailey '33, Syracuse 

B. Barkley '31, Little River 
T. BoRECKY '30, Holyrood 
M.J. Caldwell '31, EIDorado 
K. W. Comfort '31, Topeka 
L. B. Earle '33, Washington 

C. V. Everett '33, Loii,t,''tord 
T. R. GiNRicH '31, Garden Cit\' 



R. O. Creep '30, Longford 

J. C. Hartunc, '33, Parsons 

D. M. Holmes '33, Augusta 

J. W. Hood '33, Washington 

G. H. Jenkins '32, Carthage, Mo. 

C. E.Johnson '33, Belpre 

H. D. Jones '33, Augusta 

L. W. Kemper '32, Augusta 

V. W. McGinnis '33, Ord, Nebr. 

C. P. McKiNNiE '30, Glen Elder 

W. D. Moore '30, Copeiand 

L. Perkins '31, .\rgc)nia 



C. L. Reiswu; '33, HutJiinson 

F. Storz '32, Kansas Citv 

R. H. SwENsoN '32, Cimarron 

E. H. Tabu '32, Oil Hill 

Z. H. Tessendorf '31. Onaga 

C. F. Turner '33, Hartford 

M. F. Weckel '30, Ciarnett 

C. L. WooDYARD '33, W'aterviile 

|. C. WooDYAUD '33. Waterville 

'M. E. Wright '33. Kiowa 

H. E. Yenzer "32, Saliordvillc 



Fraternities 



Bauman 
Blasdel 
Criner 
Cronkite 



Daman 

Daniels 
Denman 
Farrar 



Fisher 

Grapel, G. 
Hatfield 
Henley 



HOLMQUIST 

Jensita 
Merritt 
Morgan 



Nay 
Pine 
Putney 

Richardson 



RiPPEY 

Sparks 
Spiker 
Thomas 



Walbridge 

Wl-SLEY 

Worthy 








rage 00 



Fraternities 




Alpha Tan Omega 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1865 
Delta Theta chapter established October 23, 1920 




Flower — White Tea Re 



Colors — Ax,/n-e and Old Gold 



MEMBERS 



K. C. Bauman '30, Salina 

D. F. Beach '33, Chanute 
Elmer Blasdel '33, Belle Plaine 

E. E. Criner '33, Wichita 

H. O. Cronkite '32, Belie Plaine 

E. E. Daman '31, Fort Riley 
W. W. Daniels '31, Ellsworth 
W. T. Denman '30, Sedan 

G. O. Farrar '33, Burlinganie 

F. E. Fisher '33, Cedar Vale 



E. L. Grafel '3], Hcrndon 

G. M. Grafel '31, Herndon 

H. V. Hatfield '33, Belle Plaine 

D. A. Henley '33, Eureka 
A. A. HoLMQuisT '31, Logan 

R. P. HuNsnERGER '31, Mt. Hope 

E. F. JENisTA '30, Caldwell 

E. H. Merritt '31, Fletcher, Okl.i 
Lee Morgan '33, Hugoton 
W. S. Nay '31, Manhattan 
C. A. Pine '31 , Collevvillc 



K. W. Putney '32, Topeka 

E. C. Richardson '30, Cortevvi 

E. E. RippEY '31, Ellis 

R. A. Sparks "33, Ellsworth 

R. W. Spiker '32, Manhattan 

C. H. Synnamon '30, Wicliita 

D. A. Thomas '31. Ellsworth 
H. W , WMnuinc,,- '31, Russell 
\ , V Wis,,-, \1, liurek.i 

C. M. WiMJMiY 31 , Wetmore 



Fraternities 



Allison, L. 
Bennett 
Boles 

Bo LEY, H. 



BOLEY, L 

Cain 

Franklin 
Gates 




Geiman 
Glasco 
Hemker 
Longabach 






l^ 



Lydick 

Mason 
Ott 
Robert 



Sanders 

TOMSON 

Trekell 
Weathers 



Q f^ ^ 




West 

WnxoxsiiN 

WoODLEY 





Page 92 



Fraterfiitk:. 




Beta Pi Epsilon 

Founded at K. S. A. C. February 14, 1923 
Flower— Prf;/j:j Coi^oks— Purple and Gold 



^X 




L. N. Allison '31, Falls Cicv, Ncbr. 

E. W. Bennett '3], Great Bend 

H. D. Boles '31, Madiscn 

H. C. BoLEY •3],Topeka 

L. E. BoLEY '32, Topcka 

G. E. Cain '31, Pomona 

S. P. Cory '32, Dodge City 



MEMBERS 

H. R, Geiman 3], Lamed 

E. Glasco '31, Emporia 

W. S. HtMKER '32, Great Bend 

■VV. S. LoNOABACii '32, Wakarusa 

E. R. Mason '32, VVakelield 

M. G. Ott '31, Madison 

R. C. Rolfs '31, Lorraine 



M. B. SvNDKKS '31, M:uTon 

Hi: TuEKELL '31, Belle Plaine 

\ R W ii\THEi!s '30, Great Bend 

n, i: W kst '32, Hartlord 

|. I. Wn.coxEN '31, Dod^e Citv 

C. W. WiNo '33, Benedict 

C. J. W'ooDLEV '33, Teeiimseli 



Fraternities 



Babb 
Bird 
Boone 
Braden 

COWDERY 



Duncan 
Faulkner 

FONES 
FOOTE 

Frazier 



GUERRANT 

GUNN, ChAS. 
GUNN, M. 

Haney 
Holmes 



Horn 

Householder 
Kennedy 

Kimball, S. T. 
Kimball, Tom 



Kneeland 
Lantz 

LOHMAN 

McKee 

McMlLLIN 



Mann 
Miller 

MiSSIMER 

Pearman 
Pfuetze 



Platt 
Rearwin 
Shelly 

Spense 



Thomson 
Van Aken 
Wilson 
Wood 



%12.^1 



k 



%Jkll^ 




iii^^i 




Page H 



Fraternities 




Beta Theta Pi 

Founded at Miami University, 1839 
Gamma Epsilon chapter established October 14, 1914 



Flower — Ked Re 



Colors — P/>/k am/ Bli/e 



M. }. BAnn '32, Lebanon 
R. H. Beals '31, Dodge City 
J. T. Bird '30, Manhattan 
G. I. Boone '32, Manhattan 

F. C. Braden '32, Eureka 
H. C. CowDERY '30, Lyons 

G. W. Duncan '33, Topeka 
P. E. Fairbanks '32, Topeka 

F. M. Faulioner '32, Clay Center 

K. M. Fones '32, Kansas City, Mo. 

K. E. Foote '33, Chase 

H. O. Frazier '31, Clay Center 

W. A. C}ini)s '32, Topeka 

W. U. Guerrant '33, Manhattan 

C. L. GiJNN '31, C;reat Beiul 



MEMBERS 

M. L. GuNN '33, Great Bend 

J . E. Haney '33, Topeka 

R. Hastings '32, Atchison 

H. A. Holmes '33, Eureka 

K. Horn '33, Russell 

J. W. Householder '33, Cla\' Center 

W. R. Kendall '32, Manhattan 

E. R. Kennedy '33, Chase 

S. T. Kimball '30, Manhattan 

T. R. KiMDALL '32, Manhattan 

H. Kneeland '31, Council Grove 

C. H. Lantz, )r. '31, Manhattan 

E. W. Louman '32, Chiv Center 

1). T. McKi.H '33. Ili.iuatha 

R. ). MiMii UN '^1, M.nih.ut.m 



C. L. Mann '33, Dodge Citv 

H. E. Miller '31, Manhattan 

F. Missimer, Jr. '33, Russell 

K. H. Pfuetze '30, Manhattan 

L. Pierman '33, Holron 

F. L. Platt '31, Davenport, l.i. 

R. Rearvvin '33, Salina 

R. E. Sanders '32, Burlington 

F. A. Seaton '31, Manhattan 

A. P. Shelly '30, Atchison 

R. G. Spence '31, Fairburv, Ncbr. 

J. H. Thomson '33, Emporia 

|. S. \' an a ken '33, L\ ons 

■r. \\iisi>N 'U. Maiih.ut.m 

L. l--. Woods 'M, Kansas Ciix , NU 



Page 95 



Fraternities 



AsPELIN 

Atwood 
Baldwin 
Booth 



J^^m 



Cowman 

Freeman 
Haury 
Keller 




King 
Kleiss 
Little 
McBride 






Naylor 
North 

QuiGLEY 

Schafer 



Sides 
Steele 
Stenzel 



^ Q ^ Q 

^2i 



Steps 

Winters 






Fraternities 




Founded at K. S. A. C. October 31, 1928 
Flower — American Beauty Rose Colors — Fiirple and Gold 




MEMBERS 



L. L. AsPELiN '31, Dwight 

B. E. Atwood '30, LaCygnc 

D. C. Baldwin '31, Manhattan 
F. G. Booth ^l.Olathc 

C. E. Brehm '32, Wichita 
Ferrol Cowan '33, Nickcrson 
R. W. Freeman '30, Kirvvin 
O. I. Haury '3], Halstead 



S. H. Keller '33, Ncuton 
L. R. King '31, Manhattan 
L. D. Kleiss '31, Colfevvilie 
C. O. Little '30, Manhattan 
A. ). McBride '32, Seneca 
C. W. Naylor '31, Burr Oak 
E. C. North '31, Marlow, Okla. 
Sidney North '33, Marlow, Okl 



L. J. Owsley '30, Manhattan 

G. L. Quigley '30, Halstead 

J. S. ScHAFER "32, Del Norte. Colo. 

C. D. Sides '31, Lamar, Mo. 

A. Steele '30, Manhattan 

I. R. Stenzel '30, Marion 

W.E. Steps '31. Halstead 

F. G. Winters '33, Oswego 



Fraternities 



Bowman 

Burke 

Cox 

Crans 



Gatch 

HiNKLE 

Ingle 
Jackson 




Justice 
Kay 

koelling 
Latimer 



a;iaa 



Lodge 

Massengill 
Miller 
Mitchell 







Peterson 

Stockebrand 
Timmons 
Wallace 



Weirick, F. 
Weirick, R. 
Welty 
Young 








Page 98 



Fraternities 




)iem^ 



Founded at the College of the City of New York, 1899 
Alpha Upsilon chapter established January 30, 1925 



Flower — White Carnation 



Colors — White and Nile Green 




J. W. Burke '31, Glasco 

R. W. Behermeyer '32, Abilene 

T. E. Bowman '32, Denver, Colo. 

F. W. Caldwell '32, Parsons 

J. F. Cox '33, Goodrich 

E. R. Crans '33, Lenora 

C. H. Gatcii '33, Hope 

W. C. HiNKLE '32, Lenora 

K. V. Ingle '32, Caldwell 

A. V. Jackson '32, Lenora 



W.J. Justice '31, Olathe 

D. V.'Kay '33, Morland 

G. H. KoELLiNG '30, Taliiiai^e 
K.J. Latimer '30, Hiiniholdt 
U. M. Lodge '33, Wellington 

E. H. Massenoill '33, Caldwell 
W.J. Meredith '32, Hill Citv 
L.J. Miller '31, Lebanon 
W.'R. Mitchell '31, Salina 

F. T. Moore '32, Kansas Citv, Mo. 
C. F. Newell '32, Abilene 



V. S. Peterson '30, Gvpsiim 
C. W. Stewart '32, Hunter 

E. E. Stockebrand '31, Yates Center 
A. P. TiMMONs '32, Geneseo 

A. L. Wall.\ce '33, Hill Citv 

F. H. Weirick '31, Olathe 
R. T. Weirick '32, Olathe 
I. L. Welty '32, Hill Citv 

K. L. Westrup '32, Woodbine 

G. W. Young '32, Paola 



Page I'y 



Fraternities 



Andrew 

AsjES 

Chapin 
corporon 
Dice 



Dyerly 
Ford 
Glunt 
Groody 
Haberkorn 



Hamilton 
Hoover 
Howard 
Kershaw 
Kesler 



Kimball 

Livingston 
McCord 
Marteney 
Merritt 



Nauheim 
Page 
Perham 
Rector 
Rhodes 



Russell 
Schooley 

Skinner 
Skradski 
Smith 



Stephenson 
Stahl 
Swartz 

Teichgraeber 

TiETZE 



Tucker 

Van Doren 
Wilson 
Young 



lii^l^ 




U«i* ^^W' ^*^ f. "^m 




Page 10 



Fraternities 




Delta Tan Delta 

Founded at Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia, 1859 
Gamma Chi chapter established June 6, 1919 



Flower — Pansy 



Colors — Purple, White, and Gold 




MEMBERS 



P. Andrew '31, Ottawa 

E. E. AsjEs '33, Kansas City, Mo. 

L. R. Chapin '32, Glasco 

K. CoRPORON '31, Wichita 

M. H. Dice '32, Wichita 

V. Dyerly '33, Pratt 

E. C. Fisher, Spec, St. Louis, Mo. 
G. j. Ford '33, Solomon 

P. Glunt '32, Garrison 

R. L. Groody '33, Washington 

F. Harrrkorn, Grad., Hutchinson 
C. M, Hamilton '31, Solomon 

P. Howard '30, Mount Hope 
F. Hoover '32, Enid, Okla. 



R. Johnson '30, Salina 

W. Kershaw '32, Garrison 

J. P. Kesler '33, Overbroolc 

K. Kimball '32, Nickerson 

R. Larkin '33, Admire 

G. LiviNcjsTON '31, Hutchinson 

R. McCoRD '33, Manhattan 

W. S. Marteney '33, Haven 

J. Merritt '30, Haven 

C. Nauheim '32, Hovt 

G. W. Page '33, Detroit 

W. C. Periiam '30, lola 

L. V. RficroR '30, Manhattan 

H. C. Rhodes '32, Manhattan 



Ray Russell '30, Kansas Citv, Mo. 

F. ScHOOLEY '32, Hutchinson 

T. Skinner '33, Manhattan 

A. Skradski '33, Kansas Citv 

R. Smith '33, Manhattan 

R. K. Stahl '31, Kansas Citv 

H. Stephenson '31, lola 

P. SwARTz '31, Everest 

W. Teichoraeder '33, Osaqe Citv 

H. Tietze '32, Kansas City 

A. Tucker '31, Ottawa 

H. A. Van Doren '32, EIDorado 

A. L. Wilson '33. Nallev Center 

E. Young '32, Hutchinson 



Fraternities 



Backus 
Booth 
Chapman 
Chilcott 
Dale 



Decker 
dusenbury 
Eads 
Eustace 
Fox 



Germann 
Houston 

HOUTZ 

Jacobson 
Johnson 



Kerr 

Lambertson 
Lear 
Lynn 

McCammon 



McCandless 
Mast 
Page 

Paulsen 
Powers 



Randall 
Reece 
Reitz 

Salmon 

SCHULTZ 



Sloan 
Stevens 
Stewart 
Stumbo 



Taylor, J. E. 
Taylor, J. G. 
Taylor, M. M. 
Thomson 















^ 'l ^ n O 



^^^^ii 






Page 102 




Farm House 

Founded at the University of Missouri, 1905 
Kansas chapter established June 2, 1921 



Flower — Sunburnt Rose 



Colors — Green, White, and Gold 




MEMBERS 



K. L. Backus '31, Olathc 

F. E. Booth '33, Fairview 
W. Chapman '31, Wichita 

E. D. Chilcott '33, Westmoreland 

H. W. Clutter '33, Earned 

L. L. CoMPToN '30, Manhattan 

S. E. Dale '32, Protection 

P. Decker '32, Helton 

J. W. Decker '30, Hoi ton 

K. W. Dusendury '33, Anthony 

R. F. Eads '33, Cullison 

C. E. Eustace '30, Wakefield 

G. S. Fox '33, Rozel 

I. L. Georoe '32, Mulherrv 



R. F. Germann '31, Fairview 
W. H. Houston '30, Potwin 
C. H. Houtz '33, Abilene 
L. A. Jacobson '32, Horton 

E. H. Johnson '32, Norton 
J. E. Kerr '33, Croft 

A. Lamdertson '31, Fairview 
O. G. Lear '30, Staflord 
W.J. Lynn '32, Centralia 

F. D. McCammon '33, Oronotjiie 
T. R. McCandles '33, Sr. |ohn 
A. A. Mast '30, Abilene 

C. G. Page '33, Norton 

H. a. Paulson '30, Staliord 



W. P. Powers '30, Netawaka 
E. A. Randall '33, Ashland 

0. E. Reece '31, Hopewell 
L. P. Reitz '30, Belle Plaine 
M. R. Salmon '30, Manhattan 
E. S. ScHULTz '32, Miller 

L. M. Sloan '32, Leavenworth 
H. Stevens '30, N'alencia 
S. R. Stewart '30, N'erinillion 
R. W. Stumho '31, Bavard 

1. E. Tvylor '30, Manhattan 
■|. C^,. TwLOR '31. Parsons 
M. M. TwLOR '30, Perrv 

W. A. TnoNU'soN '33, McCune 



Fraternitk.v 



Bentz, Keith 
Bentz, Kenneth 
Berry 

BOGGESS 

Bowman 
Brenz 

Brown 
Burgess 
Collins 
Correll 
Crawford 
Dalton 



Drollinger 

EXLINE 

Fatzer, Harold 
Fatzer, Hubert 
Fiser 
Grimes 

Hartman 
Johnson, Herbert 
Johnson, Wendell 
Lattin 
McCoRD 
Mathias 



Meagher 
Meyer 
Muth 

Newcombe 
Peery 
Peterson 

Platt, W. E. 
Rader 
Rhoades 
Robeson 
Roney 

SlELING 



Selfridge 
Shaver 
Smelser 
Snyder 
Stafford 



Sturgeon 
Teall 

Thompson 
Thurman 
Wallace 



Watson 
White 
Wise 
Wilson 



r^ f^ ^ r^l 





Fraternities' 




Kappa Sigma 

Founded at the University of Virginia, 1869 
Gamma Chi chapter established June 5, 1919 




Flower — I^ily of the Valley 



Colors — Scarlet, White, and Green 



Keith Bentz '31, Pcabodv 

Kenneth Bentz '33, Peabody 

W, R. BocGEss '30, Scandia 

R. E. Bowman '31, Pawnee Rock 

M. D. BREEDiNci '32, Marysville 

D. P. Brenz '31, Arkansas Citv 

v. U. Brown '32, Larned 

D. M. BuROESs '33, Oswego 

G. F. Collins '30, Lincoln, Nehr. 

J. T. CoRRELL '31, Manhattan 

D. E. Crawford '33, Dodge Citv 

S. G. Dalton '33, Dodge City 

G. E. Drollincer '30, Omaha, Nebr. 

W. E. ExLiNE '32, Kipp 

H. F. Fatzer '32, Fellsburg 

H. L. Fatzer '32, Fellsburg 

L. C. FiSER '31, Mahaska 

C. B. Freeman '31, Junction City 



MEMBERS 

R. G. Grimes ■32,.)ctmore 

F. B. Hartman '33, Horton 

G. J. Hilyard '32, Severy 
H. JOHNSON '31, Larned 
W.'W. Johnson '32, Axtell 
H. E. Lattin '33, Kipp 

J. R. Mathias '30, Manhattan 
H. H. McCoRD '33, Manhattan 

C. M. Meagher, Deceased, W'amego 

D. K. Meyer '33, Topeka 

L. M. Nash '31, Long Island 

R. A. Newcomhe '33, Manhattan 

F. A. Peery '33, Manhattan 

E. F. Peterson '31, Yates Center 
H. H. Platt '30, Manliattan 

W. E. Platt '31, Manhattan 
E. G. Rader '32, Severy 
C. M. Rhoades '31, Newton 
H. B. RoiiEsoN '33, Galena 



T. C. RoNEY '32, Webb Citv, Mo. 
O. J. Selfridoe '33, St. John 
Karl Shaver '31, Cedervale 
D. H. SiELiNG '31, Havs 
L. L. Smelser '33, Manliattan 
O. L. Snyder '33, Salina 
J. L. Stafford '32, Leonardvilie 
F. C. Sturgeon '33, Dodge Citv 
M. H. SwARTz '32. Manhattan' 
L. VV. Teal '32, Larned 
M. H. Thompson '33. Dodge Citv 
H. C. TiiuRMAN '33, Plattsburg, Mo. 
W. N. Wai.l.vce "33. Augusta ' 
|. C. \\ ArsoN '30, Frankfort 
'C. A. White, Spec, Lubbock, Texas 
|. W, Wii.soN '31, Ashland 
'G. O. Wis. '31, Newton 
|. 1), Y.HMi -31, Wintield 



Fraternities 



Briix 

Carriker 
coolbaugh 
Dole, H. 
DoLi;, W. 



Doty 

FURBECK 

Green 

GuiNN 

Hamilton 



Hays, D. 
Hays, O. 
James 
Jones 
Kelley 



Kimball 

KiRKMAN 

KiRKWOOD 

Knock 
Knouf 



Knox 

McKinsey 
Meredith 

MUXLOW 

Peters 



Pike 

Powell, C. 
Powell, G. 
Rector 

Richardson 



Rogers 
Scott 
Shepek 
Snider 
Suplee 



Tiiurow, O. 

TnUROW, R. 

Warnken 
woodiord 










4M\JA\ 




Page 100 



Fraternitk,\ 




L 



amDaa 



la 



Founded at Boston University, 1909 
Gamma Xi Zeta established April 5, 3 924 

Colors — Pitrple, Green, and Gold 




R.C. Briix '33, White City 
Dale Burkholder '32, Wamego 

D. Campbell '32, Topeka 

A. L. Casey '32, Corning 

E. E. Carriker '33, Kansas City 

B. D. CooLnAUGH '30, Stockton 
M. |. CooLBAUGH '32, Natonia 
H. S. Dole '30, A I men a 

Wm. Dole '33, Alniena 

D. Doty '32, Cunningiiani 
J. P. Dunn '33, Liberal 

J. Ellsworth '31, Cherryvaic 
L. A. FoLAN '33, Coffeyville 
R.J. FuRBECK '30, Larned 

E. Green '33, Concordia 

C. GuiNN '30, ElDorado 

L. G. Hamilton '30, Soutli Have 

D. A. Hays '32, Maiihartaii 



MEMBERS 

O. E. Hays '30, Manliattan 

H. P. Hartzell '32, Manhattan 

M. T. Heter '30, Sterling 

P.J. Isaacson '31, Walsburg 

R. W. James '33, Rossville 

L. W.Jones '32, Perry, Mo. 

W. Ke'lley '30, Kansas City 

|. G. Kimball '33, Manhattan 

L. D. KiuKMAN '33, Hays 

L. R. KiRKwooD '30 Manhattan 

M. P. Knock '31, Independence 

J. R. Knox '32, ElDorado 

Henry KNOurr '31, Circle\'ille 

H. F. Luri'EL '3), Fort Scott 

H. McKinsey '30, Kansas City 

G. E. Mereditii '31, lunctioii Cit\ 

T. ). MuxLow '30, Manh.ut.ui 

R.'l.. Pi.TFus '32, LeavcinM.nh 



L. M. Pike '30, Croddard 
C. E. Powell 32, Frank tort 
F. G. Powell '31, Frankfort 
Edris Rector '31, Manhattan 
C. D. Richardson '30, Huijoton 

C. H. Rogers '33, Rossville 
F. Scott '32, Manhattan 

S. B. Shaw '33, Galeshurg 
]. Shepek '31, Wa\nc 
■r. Smith '30, Herington 
B. S. Snider '33, .\hilene 

D. Suplee '31, Council Ciio\e 

F. H. Waunken '31. Hutchinson 
O. Thurow '30, M.uksville 
R.Thurow -^0, M.Kk^MlIc 
|. E. WoiHMc^un -33. S.ilm.i 
'll. \y Woou V M, I ilvr.il 



rasw 107 



Fraternities 



Ayers 
Brown 

Chamberlin 
Dale 



Davidson 
Drake 
Engdahl 

Falin 



Fos 



Glasscock 
Heer 

Hollembeak 



Irwin 
Jackson 

Montgomery 
Norton 



rohrbaugh 
Scott 
Shelor 
Treaster 



Wampler 

WiENEKE 

Wise 



YOUNIE 
ZlES 








""aa 




Fraternities 




Omega Tau Epsiloii 

Founded at K. S. A. C. May 16, 1920 
Flower — Jot2q!til Colors — Purple and Wine 




J. R. Ayres '33, (jreenlcat 
R. I. Brown '31, Hutchinson 
Scott Burton '32, Burlingame 
W. Chamberlain '31, Newton 
R. B. Dale '32, Stafford 
E. A. Davidson '33, Cimarron 
R. C. Dial '31, Manhattan 
L. E. Drake '32, Natoma 
L. I. Engdahl '33, Marqiiettc 
S. L. Falin '31, Cleburne 



C. H. Foss '32, Manhattan 

|. K. Glasscock '33, Molin; 

'W. G. Heer '33, Manhattan 

H. D. HoLLEMBEAK '33, Ingalls 

Frank Irwin '33, Manliattan 

]. E. Jacobson '33, Attica 

■r. W'. )ackson '30, Denver, Colo. 

R. H. juRDEN '32, Kansas Cirv, Mo. 

L. H. Montoomeky '33, Ncodcsha 

L. H. Norton '31, Kalvcsta 



D. W. RonKMAL'cii '33, Cimarro 
R. L. Scott '30, Le Loup 
W. E. SiiELOR '32, Dodge Citv 
W. L. Treaster "30, Bcloit 
J. E. Wampler '33, Garden City 
P. |. W'ustkrm.^n "31, Waniego 
L.'G. W'ikneke "30, S.ibetha' 
G. E. Wise '31, Wichita 
G. A. YociNii '33, N.it una 
L. W. ZiEs '32, Prait 



Fraternities 



BURNSIDE 

Ehrlich, C. 
Ehrlich, M. 
Fleming 
Groesbeck 



Grover 
Hacker 
Hanson 
Hartman 
Heath 



Hollingshead 
horchem, d. 

HoRCHEM, R. 

Hume 
Hunt 



Johnson 
Jones 

KiNNAMON 

Mangelsdorf 
Peterson 



Phillips 
Price, D. 
Price, H. 
Reichart 
Rever 



Richard 

Scherzinger 
Sheetz 
Spilman 



Stewart 
Stump 
Wyatt 




Pane no 



Fraternit. 



les 




Pki Delta Theta 

Founded at Miami University, 1848 
Kansas Gamma established February 25, 1921 



Flower — White Carnation 



Colors — A';:^iire and Argent 



B. W. BuRNsiDE '33, Garden City 
L. P. BuRRis '31, Chanute 

A. M. Downer '31, Syracuse 

C. O. Ehrlich '31, Marion 
M. Ehri.ich '32, Marion 

R. W. Flemino '33, Manhattan 
A. Groesdeck '33, Manhattan 
O. F. Grover '32, Manhattan 
W. T. Hacker '33, Medford, Okla. 
R. G. Hanson '30, Kansas City, Mo. 
W. F. Hardman '30, Frankfort 
R. L. Hartman '30, Hoisin/Jton 
H. T. Heath '31, Enterprise 



E. F. Hollingshead '33, Chanute 

O. D. Horchem '31, Ransom 

R. Horchem '33, Ransom 

R. M. Hoss '30, Potwin 

W. G. Hume '33, Arkansas City 

H. M. Hunt '33, Chillicothe, Mo. 

T. B. JOHNSON '32, Olsburg 

T. L. )oNEs '32, Garden Cit\' 

W. B.'Kinnamon '30, Earned 

H. G. Mangelsdorf '30, Atchison 

W. R. Peterson '32, Topeka 

R. Phillips '33, loplin, Mo. 

D. E. Price '31 .' Wakdicld 



H. Price '33, Kress, Texas 
S. J. Rever '32, Parsons 
G. Richards '32, Topeka 
H. M. Reichart '32, Vallcv 
K. W. Root '31, Topeka 
C. E. Row '32, Earned 
). W. Scherzinger '32, Ran; 
S. L. SiiEETz '33, Chillicoflu 
R. R. Spilman '33, M.inhart 
C:. W , Snw m;i ^1. Coklu.i 
Mil SicMi' ^:, Ulu. R.ipu 

1). W , W VVU \\. StO.ktOll 



Page 111 



Fraternities 



Bertotti 

BONFIEI 



Carlson 
Cavanaugh 
Coleman 



CORRI 



Curtis' 
Dyer 



Fitzgerald 
Florell 



Foster 
Gribben 



Hammond 
Jones 



Kelley 



Klotzbach 
kotapish 
Kuffler 



kurtenbach 
Majerus 
Makins 
Mermis 

MlCHA 



NiGRO 

Pafford 

Petsch 

POLCYN 

Raleigh 



Satunas 
Schafer 
Shaffer 

SCHILTZ 



Stein 

Sullivan 
Walsh 

Weingarth 




tf^ 













k: 



iL^ 



a 









£ 




J2 



Page 112 



Fraternitie.\ 




a 



Founded at Brt)wn University, Providence, Rhode Island, 1889 
Iota chapter established April 9, 1921 



Flo'wer — Ophelia Rose 



Colors — Fiirple, White, and Gold 




MEMBERS 



T. Bertotti '30, Osage City 
P. BoNFiELD '31, Elmo 
A. Carlson '30, Manhattan 
L. Cavanauoh '33, Esbon 
R. Coleman '30, Wichita 
D. CoRRic.AN '32, Holyrood 
. E. Curtis '33, Wichita 
J. Dyer '31, Leavenworth 
. M. FiTzr.ERALD '31, Fairhur 
S. Florrell '30, Manhattan 
F. Foster '32, Topeka 
L. Grihhbn '33, Cvpsuni 
O. Hamk^cu '30, Bnshton 



L.J. Hammond '33, Kansas Citv, Mo 

L. D. Jones '33, Manhattan 

V. f. Kelley '32, Chapman 

M.'S. KLOTzn.uH '31, Humboldt 

Ed Kotapisii '32, Blue Rapids 

T. A. Kurtenhacu '32, Lindsav, Nch 

J. K. KuiT-LER '31, Parsons 

R. A. Kern '32, Junction Citv 

C. |. Majkrus '31, Falls Citv, Nebr. 

M.' F. Makins '31, Abilene 

A. C. Mi'.uMis '33, Gorhani 

|. C. Mkiiaklts '33, Paxico 

Alk.v N.cho '31, Kansas Citv, Mo. 



R.J. Pafpord '31, Salina 
Elmer Petsch '31, Waterville 
T. N. PoLCYN '31, Gorham 
F.J. Raleigh '30, Clyde 

C. A. Reynolds '33, Wilder 

E. R. S.\tun.\s '33, Chicaijo, 111. 
J. N. ScHiLTz '32, Wakeheld 

D. F. ScHAiER '31, Fort Scott 
J. A. Shaffer '32, Simpson 
Q.J. Stein '32, Parsons 

E. S. Sullivan '33, Mercier 
A. B. Walsh '31, Osaije Citv 

F. C. Wi-.Nr, ^RrH '32.' l.eavcnu > 



Fraternities 



Arndt 
Baker 

BOEHNER 

Brainard 

Brandenburg 



Brand 
Brown 




Burghart 

COMPTON 

Elwell 



EwiNG 

Funk 
Gapen 

Ghormley 
Hagstrom 



Harvey 
Jefferies 
Johnson 
Kent 
Kewley 



Mohney 
Paske 
Pearce 
PococK 
Regier 



Reid 

ROWE 

Rychel 
Seagraves 
Stansbury 



Toadvine 
Underwood 

Warner 
Wehl 

Whitney 



Q O ^ O 





Page IIJ, 



Fraternities 




Pti Kappa Tan 

Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, March 17, 1906 
Alpha Epsilon chapter established May 23, 1925 



Flower — Keel Carnation 



Coi 



-Old Gold and Harvard Red 




W. ]. Arndt '31, Hutchinson 
C. 6. Baker '30, Marvsville 
W. B. Bandy '32, Parsons 
j. B. BoEHNER '31, Downs 
C. L. Brainard '30, Denver, Cok 
H, A. Brand '32, McPherson 
W. E. Brandenhurc; '32, Riley 
Robert Brown '32, Manhattan 
L. J. BuRCiiiART '31, Chanute 
L. H. CoMPTON '31, Larned 
H. A. Elwell '31, Hutchinson 
Wayne Ewing '31, Beloit 



C. E. Funk '31, lola 

K. M. Gapen '30, Ulvsscs 

C. E. Ghormley '31, Hutchinst)! 

W. ). Haostrom '33, Lindsborg 

V. E. Harvey '31, Sehna 

V. E. Jefferies '31, Kiowa 

V. W.' Johnson '32, Salina 

C. W. Kewley '32, Stockton 
O, M. MoiiNEY '31, Sawyer 
H. A. Paske '33, Toronto 
M. Pearce '33, Miltonvale 

D. F. PococK '32, Atlanta 



E. M. Regier '31, McPherson 
J. K. Reid '31. Manhattan 
V. C. RowE '31, Dighton 
R.J. Rychel '32, Downs 
W. Seagraves '32, Topeka 
G. A. Stansbury '33, Ulysses 
A. L. ToADViNE '32, Dii;hton 
L. Underwood '33. DcKalh. i\U 
|oHN Warner '31, Whituii; 
'K- A- Willi 'U. S.ottsville 
H A. W iiiiNM '3:. I'ru.i 



Page in 



Fraternities 



AiNSWORTH 

Armstrong 

AXTELL 

Baird 

Blasdel 



CiLEK 

Crawford 
Fry 



Hoffman 

HURD 
HUYCK 



Jensens 
Kelly 

KlRKPATRICK 

Leasure 
Leverett 



Long 

McCuLLOH 

McLachlan 
Patterson 
Raven 



Roehrman 
Schwanke, J. 
Schwanke, 1 
Todd 

TOOMEY 




Fraternities 




PM Lambda Thet 



a 



Founded at Pennsylvania State College, November 18, 1920 
Beta chapter established April 29, 1923 



Flower — White Ciiynation 



Colors — Purple, Gold, and White 




MEMBERS 



C. AiNswoRiH '32, Abilene 

R. Armstronc-, '31, Lecompton 

H. AxTELL '30, Dimniitt, Texas 

W. Baird '32, Topeka 

J. Blasdel '33, Sylvia 

C. Collins '31, Wellington 

H. Crawford '30, Kansas Citv 

H. Fry '31, Hope 

M. Gaumer '31, Jennings 

M. George '31, Wichita 

H. GiLE '30, Scandia 

R. Greene '33, Lincoln 



V. Hahn '32, Kansas City 

E. Hall '32, Manhattan 

P. Heinbach '31, Neodesha 

W. Hoffman '32, Hope 

j. HoYNE '31, Salina 

j. HuRD '33, Pawnee Citv, Nebr 

K. HuYCK '32, Morrow v'ille 

R.James '31, Wetmore 

E. Jensen '32, Hcrington 

J. Kelley '31, Mayetta 

H. KiRKPATRicK '32, Wehhcr 

O. Leasure '31, LaCygne 

M. Leverett '31, Bartlesvillc, C 



C. Long '33, Monowvilie 
M. McCulloh '31, Shawnee 

D. McLachlan '30, Plcasanton 
H. Miller '31, Kansas Citv 

R. Patterson '31, Monowvilie 

M. Raven '33, Morrowxillc 

S. Roeiirman '32, White Cit\- 

J. ScHWANKE '30, Alma 

L. ScHWANKE '33, Alma 

C. Todd '30, Aiihiirn 

F. TooMEY '30, Neodesha 

E. Williams '32, Neodesha 



Fraternities 



Barre 

Campbell 
Converse 
Dawe 
Dixon 
Edie 



Garver 
Gilbert 

GORRELL 

Green 
Gump 
hodshire 



Hraba 
Hyde 
Karr, E. 
Karr, J. 
Mayden 
Merrill 



Meyers, A. 
Meyers, J. 

MOGGE 

Neihart 
Neville 

Ne'wman 



Parrish 

PiNCOMB 

Reinecke 

RlEE 

Russell 
Schrader 



Shier, G. 
Shier, W. 
Smith 
Turner 
Unruh 
Vesecky, 



Vesecky, S. 

VoHS 

Walker 

Wiggins, D. 
Wiggins, G. 
Yeakley 









Payc lis 



Frateniitie: 




^^^MJMhAlMmk. 




)io:ma 



a 



Founded at Massachvisetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 

March 15, 1873 

Iota Deuteron chapter established March 24, 1923 

Colors — Silver and Aiafi^enta 




L. AuKER '32, Norcatur 
A. Barneck '31, Salina 
H. Barre '30, Tampa 

D. Bowman '32, Pawnee Rock 
Black '32, Udca 

L. Campbell '31, McPherson 

E. Converse '33, Pawnee Rock 
J. Dawe '31, Abilene 

D. Dixon '32, Norcatur 
Edie '33, Merriani 
G. Garver '31, Abilene 

W. Gilbert '31, Manhattan 
. I. Gorrell '31, Onaga 

D. Green '33, Norton 

G. Green '32, Norton 

H. Gump '33, Abilene 

L. Hartley '32, Manhattan 



MEMBERS 

R. L. HoDsiiiRE '32, CofFeyville 
A. R. Hraba '32, East St. Louis, 
H. T. Hyde '32, 'Wichita 
I. H. Karr '30, Trov 
L. E. Karr '33, Troy 
G. A. Krider '31, Newton 
I. M. Mayden '33, Manhattan 
S. T. Merrill '32, Abilene 
A. M. Meyers '31, Merriam 
|. \V. Meyers '33, Merriani 
). G. MocKiE '32, Goodland 
j. M. Neville '31, Cofleyville 
E. M. Newman '32, LaCrossc 
R. B. Niehart '33, Lyndon 
C. C. Pakrism '31, Radium 
n. L, I'lN.oMi. '33, Overland Pai 
C;. L. Pkyok 'y, Sal.na 



J. H. Reinecke '33, Great 1 
C. A. Rife '31, Anthony 
W. E. Russell '30, LaCross 
M. C. ScHRADER '32, Oliyei 
G. R. Shier '31, Gypsum 
W. D. Shier '33, Gxpsum 
P. G. Smith '31. Potxvm 
R. F. Turner '^2, M.nih.iit 
V. A. Unruh '3:, I'.nsnec 1 
A. Vesecky '3^ K.Mis.is I It 
S. L Vesecky ^^^. K.nis.is C 
R. F. \'oMS '31 . Os.nx.Komi 
R, S. W'm km; -M. Galen.i 
UK W ri MK U, Ol.uhe 
I), Wu.ciNs '^l, l.vons 

ti. S. W ICC.INS ■3:. I.MMIS 

O. L. Yi \KiiY '30, lloisnu 



Fraternities 



Biles 

Blackburn 
Blair 
Brodine 
Carver 



Ellis 
Evans 
Fletcher 
Fockele 
Hahn 



Hall, J. 
Hall, L. 
Hammond 
Hardtarfer 
Helming 



Hollingsworth 
Kackley 
Klein 
Martin 
Oberg 



Rayburn 
Sanders 



5CHWINDLER 
SiLVERWOOD 

Steele 



Taylor 

Walker, D. 
Walker, O. 

WOMER 




Page 120 



Fraternities 




Founded at the University of \^irginia, 1868 
Alpha Omega chapter established 1913 



Flower — Lily of the Valley 



Colors — Garnet and Gold 



MEMBERS 



G. G. Biles '30, Chanute 

E. D. Blackburn '31, Anthony 

G. I. Blair '31 , Junction City 

A. R. Brodine '32, Salina 

Jack Carr '33, Salina 

C.J. Chapi'ell '31, Repuhlic 

L. A. Davidson '32, Bucklin 

L. M. Drake '32, Natoma 

Gene Ellis '33, Council Cirove 

Howard Evans '32, Manhattan 



F. F. Fletcher '33, Bucklin 
M. M. Fockele '32, Ottawa 
F. W. Gurney '31, Independence 
M. F. Hahn '33, Clav Center 
L. K. Hall '33, Chicago, 111. 
J. F. Hall '33, Council Cirove 
H. J. Hammond '32, Osborne 
O. M. Hardtari'er '32, Lawrence 
R. B. Helmino '32, Alkon, 111. 
E. D. Hoi.LiNCiswoRTii '30, Salina 



W. G. Klien '33, Halstead 

F. S. Martin '31, Manhattan 

W. E. Oderg '33, Manhattan 

J. C. Rayburn '32, Newton 

R. W. Schvvindler '33, Kansas C it\ 

K. J. SiLVERwooD '30, Ellsworth 

C. G. Steele '32, Waterville 

C. O. Tackwell '30, Manhattan 

D. M. Walker '32, Anthonv 

O. H. Wai.kir '31, lunction Cit\ 



I'aijc IJl 



Fraternities 



Barnett 
Benner 
Blair 
Bliss 

DiLLARD 



Gaddie 
Harrop 
holmberg 
Hostettler 
Huntington 



Jackson 
Johnson 

KiSSICK 

Lewis 

LORENZ 



McBurney 
Menzie 

Merryfield 
Miller 

MOYER 



NOLDER 

Peak 
Powers 
Prentup 

RiEPE 



Rogler 
Seyb 

Spang LER 
Steele 

Stephenson 



Teter 

Thompson 
Towner 

Washington 



Witts 

Whitesidjc 

YlCAGIiR 

ZiinoLD 




1^%^ 



Pane 122 



Fraternities 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Founded at University of Alabama, March 9, 1856 
Kansas Beta chapter established January 24, 1913 



Flower — Violet 



Colors — Purple and Gold 



^ 



MEMBERS 



D. W. Barnett '31, Gallatin, Mo. 

E. B. Benner '32, Weston, Mo. 
R. O. Blair '33, Coleman, Texas 
M. G. Bliss '32, Minneapolis 

B. A. DiLLARD '32, Chillicothe, Te.xas 

F. Gaddie,Jr. '33, Bazaar 

G. B. Harrop '33, Manhattan 
E. HoLMnERG '30, Kansas Citv 

A. A. HosTETTLER '31, Hutchinsoii 

Fred Huntinoton '31, Eureka 

James Johnson '31, Solomon 

S. K. Jackson '31, Holton 

R. KrssKK, Jr. '33, Kansas Citv 



L. Lewis '31, Hays 

C. T. LoRENz '31, Salin.i 

E. C. McBuRNEY '30, Ncwion 
J. W. Menzie '32, Manhattan 

V. T. Merryi'ield '33, Minneapolis 

A. E. Miller '32, Cottonwood Falls 

C. H. Mover '31, Hiawatha 

G. 'W. Nolder '33, Dodj,'e Citv 

P. F. Peak '32, Manhattan 

H. P. Powers '30, |inuiu)n Ciiv 

F. B. Prentup '31,' link lion Cil\ 
R. C. RiEPE '30, K.uK.is C it\ 

R. C. RooLER '31, M.iiih.iti.nt 



F. Sevi. '32, Prcttv Prairie 

G. Smith -31, Manhattan 

D. H. Spanoler '31, Stanton, Neb 
H. W. Steele '33, Arcadia 
A. H. Stephenson '32, Clements 
R. E. Teter '31, EIDorado 
I. \ . Thonu'son '33. Goodland 
|. G, Towner '31. Owi^lu 
G, W \sinN.,roN -31, M.inh.iitan 
1 \ W 111 M SUM '^l, WoJ.sha 
I W. W ins \\, Top.k.i 
j. J. Vi M.IK W. H.i/.i.ir 
R. A. ZiMom '32. Pnie Blull, Ark 



Fraternities 



Allison 

Armstrong 
Atkins 
Bader 
Beard 

BiCKEL 



Brewer 

COBERLY 

COFFMAN 
CONDELL 
COWLES 

Crocker 

Dalton 

Epperson 
Evans 
Everett 
Farnham 
Florer 

forsberg 
Garrison 
Going 
Grigg 

Hammond 
Harsh 



Hasler 
Johnston 
Johntz 

Jones 

KiGER 

Lantz 

McCoLLUM 

Manley 
Meissinger 
Monson 
Nichols 
Pearson 

Philip 
Pratt, J. 
Pratt, L. 
Reeder 
Richmond 

SrHTTTKR 



Slaughter 
Roberson 
Walker 

Wallerstedt 
Whitehead 



WlCKHAM 

Wolf 
Wright 

YOUNKIN 




4 m JrA ^x I ^^ 




g 9 9 < 




Page 12J, 



Fraternities 




Sigma 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January 1, 1869 
Beta Kappa established May 23, 1913 



Flower — White Rose 



Colors— B/ack, White, ami Cold 




M. F. Allison '30, Great Bend 
J. W. Amis '30, Manhattan 
J. L. Armstrong '33, Salina 
G. M. Atkins '30, Fort Scott 
A. K. Bader '33, Junction City 
L. R. Beard '32, McPherson 
R. A. BicKEL '32, Kansas City, Mo. 
H. P. CoBERLY '30, Hutchinson 
W. W. CoFFMAN '30, Ovcrbrook 

F. R. CoNDELL '31, ElDorado 

M. A. CowLEs '31, Sharon Springs 
E. E. Crocker '30, Manhattan 
L. H. D ALTON '33, Fort Scott 

G. H. Davis '31, Manhattan 

A. H. Epperson '30, Manhattan 
T. M. Evans '30, Gove 
A. E. Everett '31, Hutchinson 
J. A. Farnham '33, Abilene 



R. S. Florer '31, Marion 

W. A. Forsbero '31, Lindsborg 

L. E. Garrison '32, Manchester 

]. E. Going '33, Topeka 

'W. K. Grioo '30, Abilene 

M. H. Hammond '32, Great Bend 

G. R. Harsh '32, ElDorado 

H. L. Hasler '32, ElDorado 

J. A. Johnston '33, junction Citv 

J. H. JoHNTZ '32, Abilene 

"W. N.JoLi.EY '32, M.inh.itt.m 

H. Jones '32, Horton 

M. M. Kiger '31, Washington 

B. R. Lantz '32, Salina 

R. H. McCoLi.uM '30, ElDorado 

P. L. Manley '30, Topeka 

W. H. Meissinckr '31, Abilene 



N. V. Monson '32, Lindsborg 
R. T. Nichols, Jr. '30, Manhattan 
P. E. Pearson '31, Manhattan 
W. R. Philip '33, Havs 
J. W. Pratt '30, Manhattan 
L. A. Pr.\tt '32, Manhattan 
C. E. Reeder '30, Troy 
W. A. Richmond '33, Stockton 
I. E. RoBERSoN '32, Abilene 
E. K. ScHULER '33, Vallev Falls 
K. W. Slaughter '32, Manhattan 
K. A. Walker '33, Glen Elder 
E. R. Wmii-ksiiih '31, M.inhatt.ui 
W , M W Miiini \n -^3, \bilenc 
M. A, W u(.ii \M M. M.nih.ut.m 
G. G, Wolf '32, Marion 
\ A Wright '33, Coiuordi.i 
1. \\ . VouNKiN '32, Wakeliekl 



Fraternities 



Andrick 
Beal 
Beck 

Benjamin 
Besler 
Brookover, G. 



Brookover, p. 
Brown 
Bruner 

Carmichael 
Castello 
Collier 



Coleman 
Course 
Daniels 
Downing 
Du Mars 
Faulconer 



Flippo 
Fry 

GwiNN 

Hammond 
Harrison 
Hay 



Hinckley 

HOBBS 

Hodgson 

Jones 
Kepley 
Knorr 



Lang 
Mailen 
Nicholson 
Nutter 
Phillips 
Resch 



Rust 
Smith 
Sutton 
Taylor 
Tedrow 

Tefertiller 



LJNCiER 

Vrooman 
Williams 
Woodruff 
Wyan T 
Zeckser 





5^. 1*^ <^ ^ 

f^ \\ ^), Q 





Paue 126 



Fraternities 




Sigma PM Epsilon 

Founded at the University of Richmond, 1901 
Kansas Beta chapter established February 23, 1918 

Flowers — American Beauty Rose and Violet 
Colors — Koyal Purple and Red 




E. L. Andrick '31, Wlicaton 
Vernon Beck '30, Topcka 

K. U. Benjamin '33, Dccrlicld 
G. G. Beal 33, Eureka 
R. C. Besler '33, Manhattan 
G. S. BuooKovER '31, Eure-ka 
P. E. Brookover 31 , Scott Citv 
H. R. Brown '33, ElDorado 
H. H. Bruner '30, Concordia 
L. Carmichael '33, Manliattan 

F. W. Castello '33, McCiinc 
H. A. Coleman '31, Dcnison 

L. E. Collier '32, Ardnian, Okla. 

D. P. Course '33, Abilene 

L. Daniels '33, St. Francis 

M. E. DowNiNc, '33, Dccrlicld 

M. L. DuMars '33, Agra 

J. V. Faulconer '30, ElDorado 



MEMBERS 

D. M. Flippo '32, Abilene 

Frank Fry '31, Eureka 

F. W. GwiNN '33, Falls City, Nebr 

L. A. Hammond '31, Wichita 

R. D. Harrison '30, Burden 

R. C. Hay '31, Parker 

H. W. Hinckley '30, Barnard 

W. H. Hoiins '32, ElDorado 

R. M. HoDcisoN '33, Little River 

C. Johnson '32, Eureka 

W.' J. Jones '33, ElDorado 

L. F. Kepley '31, Chanute 

Fritz Knorr '31, Savannah, Mo. 

R. A. LAN(i '33, Denver, Colo. 

R. F. Lanc; '33, Denver, Colo. 

A. |. MeCL.;i;RV 'M, l-sboii 

T. H. Mailun '33, (OIIOIIUOO.I l.l 



W. Nicholson '31, Eureka 

E. Nutter '30. Falls Citv, Nebr. 
. E. Phillips '31, Scott Cit\- 

. F. Resch '31, Independence, Mo. 
H. Rust '32, Manhattan 
W. Smith '31, Ru.ssell 
A. Sutton '33, ElDorado 

F. Taylor '31, .\sliland 

D. Tedrow '32, Medicine Lodi^e 
D. Tefertiller '31, Wichita ^ 

G. Unc-.er '31, ElDorado 

L. N'room \N '31, Independence 
i; WniiuKK •^^, ElDorado 
R W 111 I VMS 32, \allev Center 

n WooHKiMi 'U. Dod-eCitv 
!•;. \\^ vNr ^l.Topeka 

C. W Yvrr '33, Carthai,'e, Mo. 

. W. Zeckser '33, Alma 



Page li7 



Fraternities 



Baird 
Banks 
Barber 
Byers 



Cathcart 

COOLEY 

Gardner 
Getty 



Hadley 

Halverstadt 
Hay 

Hickman 



Ingraham 
Kimes, K. 

KlMES, W. 
KOPF 



Lawrence 
Richardson 

Stanley 



Thudin, C. 
Thudin, H. 

ZiRKLE 




Page 12S 



Fraternities 




Sigma PM Sigma 

Founded at K. S. A. C. in 1922 
Flower — Red Rose Colors — Ked cnnl W'hitf 



H. Anderson '30, Richland 
J. L. Baird '31, Wellsville 
b. H. Banks '31, Waniego 
B. W. Barber •3I, Alton 
H. R. Byers '33, Hoxie 
B. R. Cathcart '32, Winchc 
H. C. CooLEY '33, Stockton 
E. Gardiner '32, Oxford 



R. C. Getty '32, Winchester 

A. C. Hadley '31, Oklahoma Cit> 

L. Halverstadt '32, Oxford 

L. E. Hay '32, Clay Center 

M. P. Hickman '33, Kirwin 

|. W. Ingraham '30, Manhattan 

Fay Kimes '31, Dodge Citv 

Wayne Kimes '30, L^odge Citv 

C. M. KoiM- '30, Bcverlv 



E. P. Lawrence '30, Eads, Colo. 
C. D. Pierce 31, Scranton 
H. D. Richardson '31, Long Island 
C. A. Standlev '31, Lucas 

C. F. Thudin '31, Mulvane 
H. P. Thudin '30, Mulvane 

D. C. Wright '31, Bronson 
H. A. Zirkle '32, Berryton 



Activities 




The College Orchestra 



Professor Lyle Downey 

Conductor 






Max 


Ma 




^ IX 






tin 


- - - KjOnceit i\\.astei 




First VioUns 






Violas 


Flutes 


Trombones 


Drusilla Beadle 






Le Vare Fossnight 


Catherine Colver 


John Hartung 


M. Knock 






Kenneth Phelps 


Frances Conrad 


Gerald Powell 


Max Martin 










Bruce Prentice 


Sybil Parks 
Marjorie Pvle 
Emily Rumold 






Cdlos 

Blaine Coolbaugh 


Bassoons 

Prof. E. K. Chapin 




Curtis Sides 






Dr. J. L. Hall 


Prof. E. V. Floyd 


DrufNs and Tympani 


Joseph Slechta 






Ashley Monahan 
Kathryn Wilson 


Clarinets 


John Burke 
Emery Good 


Second Violins 








Margaret Colver 


C. E. Moorman 


Rebf.cca Curtis 






String Basses 


William Edwards 




B. K. Geraghty 






Jack Carr 


Benj. Markley 




Harry Hinchsliff 
Minnie M. Lane 






Professor Feroe 


Tnmipets 


Piano 


Eugenia Leighton 








Ernest Green 


Maxine Brown 


Virgil Morey 






Oboes 


C. E. Powell 




Louise Reed 
Louie Rufener 
Alta Tiiierer 






Bill Fitch 


Rowena Stiles 


French Horns 


Wilbur Waul 










Tom Groody 


Florence Wiltze 










Homer Yoder 


'^m^mmim§m^sm^^^m/m 


mm^^m^^^mmmmmm 





Page ISO 



The College 



Activities 




C. G. O; 



SSMANN 



Dn/in Major 



Clarinets 

L. R. Adler 
Ray Beals 
Howard Brand 
Carl Chappell 
Margaret Colver 
MiLLBERN Davison 
a. l. dorman 
William Edwards 
Robert Eychner 
Helene Hahn 
Ruth Haughawout 
V. H. Jeffries 
Ben Lantz 
Arthur Lundgren 
Ben Markley 
J. R. Mathias 
C. W. Naylor 

A. B. NiEMOLLER 

Dale Thomas 
Ralph Van Camp 
M. E. Vautravers 

E-flat Clarinets 
Alfred Helm 



Flute and Piccolo 
Catherine Colver 
E. S. Shonyo 



Oboe 

Bill Fitch 

Trumpets 
Lois Avis 
J. A. Bryan 
Lea Collett 
W. V. Combs 
Paul Condry 
Marvin Davis 

B. C. FiLKIN 

Letha Goheen 
Ernest Green 
Velma Hahn 
Willard Hoffman 
Vernon Jefferies 
CO. Little 
Don Nutter 

C. E. Powell 
W, A, Sells 
RowENA Stiles 



Trombones 
J. L. Baird 
H. T. Blanchard 
C. E. Brehm 

C. L. Brown 
Rose Grosshardt 
John Hartung 
Helen Lentz 
Hazen Love 

R. F. Melville 

G. W. NOLDER 

F. G. Powell 
Bruce Prentice 

D. T. Skinner 
Virgil Unruh 

Baritones 

Austin Morgan 
Karl Muenzenmayi 



H«, 



Tom Groody 
L. B. Noble 
L. M. Schruben 
J. C. Slechta 
M. H. Thompson 
Homer Yoder 



Saxophones 

Abbie Downey 
G. E. Feldhausen 
D'Vere Kay 
L. W. Kemper 
H. K. Learned 
Sumner Lyons 
C. R. Smith 
Maynard Solt 
Paul Westerman 



E. Collins 
Ralph Freeman 
J. W. Jordan 
T. L. Mathias 
V. T. Merrifield 
LaVelle Schruben 
Maurice Schruben 



Cymbals 

P. D. RoCKWOOD 



Snare Drums 
Emery Good 
J. H. KarrI 
Harlan Rhodes 
E. K. Schuler 



Tvmpani 
John Burke 



ass Drums 
H. L. KiPiER 
Hal McCord 



Military Bugles 
A. V. Brunke 
Frank Freeman 
Clarence Gatch 
John Hamon 
Chas. Monteith 
E. W. Peck 
G. A. Stansdury 
Dick West 




Page IS I 



Activities 




The Men's Glee Club 



Professor Wm. Lindquist 
Director 



#.♦ 






f'|l|f|f|lfltr 



Powell, F. Mailen. Hoefener, Bruner. Toburen, Poole, Hemker. Edlin. Reed. Haceman 
Chapman, Knock, Brown, Morey. Shepherd, Macy, Lyons, Powers, Powell, C. 
Fry, Gibson, Blasdel, Redding, Russell. Hollingsworth, Schrac, Reese 
Hatfield, Benne, Monti eth, Yoder, Johnson, Coolbaugh, Byers 
Reiswig, Regnier, Sutherland, Thomson, Kent, Chase 



Homer Yoder 



Accompanist 



Pint Tenon 
J. T. Blasdel 
J. P. Chapman 
A. E. Chase 
M. P. Knock 

C. F. MONTIETH 

V. L. Morey 
Wm. Poole 
C. E. Powell 
F. G. Powell 
L. A. Reese 
H. H. Regnier 
R. H. Russell 



Second Tenors 
H. V. Hatfield 
W. Hemker 
W. W. Johnson 
G. R. Kent 
W. V. Redding 
E. Reed 
C. L. Reiswig 



First Basses 

Kenneth Benne 
V. U. Brown 
H. R. Byers 

B. D. Coolbaugh 
H. L. Fry 

C. A. Hageman 
E. B. Macy 

T. H. Mailen 
C. L. Shepherd 
J. H. Thomson 
G. E. Toburen 



Second Basses 
H. H. Bruner 
Frank Edlin 
C. B. Gibson 
R. K. Hoefener 

C. Hollingsworth 
S. V. Lyons 

W. S. Powers 
E. P. Schrag 

D. C. Sutherland 
Homer Yoder 



The Women's Gl 



ee i^iu 



h 



Activities 




Professor Edwin Sayre 
Director 



MEMBERS 



Clementine Bacon 
LoRMNE Barrett 
Thelma Carver 
Marguerite Chaffin 
lucile correll 
Frances Curtis 
Lillian Daugherty 
Helen Durham 
Frances Fockele 
Rose Grossardt 
Katharine Harding 
Clare Harner 
Laura Hart 
Ver Lee Hotz 
Edythe Huitt 



Aileen Hull 
Electa Hull 
Mary Jane Isbell 
Frances Jack 
Roberta Jack 
Mary Joblino 
Helen Lentz 
Helen Lichty 
Lillian Lohmeyer 
Ruth McChesney 
Agnes McClaren 
Mildred Masden 
Johnnie Moore 
Olive Morgan 
Gladys Mortensen 



Gretchen O'Connor 
Helen Rust 
Pauline Samuel 
Gladys Schmedemann 
Emily Seaburg 
Gertrude Sheetz 
Frances Simpson 
Ruth Smith 
Mary Louise Thurow 
Bessie Tyree 
Juanita Walker 
Elsie Wall 
Jo Marie Wise 
Gertrude Wuester 




Harner, Durham, R.Jack, Grosshardt. Rust, Moork, Mortensen, Lohmf.yer. Walk 
Curtis. Lentz, Harding, Hart. Daugherty, Shkutz, Morgan, Schmeuf.mann, McChus 
Hotz, Fockei.k, Tyrf:!-:. Isbhi i F.Jack, Masdhn, Barrktt, Corri;li . Wall 
Samuf;i., \L. Hlill, Lkiiiv, A I liii i , Thurow, Chaiitn. Jobiing, C"arvi:r 



Activities 




ackerman 
Durham 
Fry 

Powers 



Raleigh 
Stewart 

Taylor, B. R. 



Taylor, M. M. 
Terrell 

Winters 



TlCU 



.ssociatioii 



npHE Agricultural association is an organization of all students in the division of agriculture. The purpose of 
the organization is to co-ordinate efforts of the several departments of the division, and to promote the interest 

of the student. 

The association sponsors the annual Ag Fair, The Kansas Agricultural Student, the Ag Barnwarmer, and the 
giving of medals to members of inrerct)llegiate judging teams. 



OFFICERS 

j. A. Terrel'. Pieudoit 

H. L. Fry Vice-President 

M. M.Taylor - Secretary 

W. P. Powers Treasurer 

Paae 131, 



Activitk. 



npHE third annual "Ag" Barnwarmer was held in Nichols 
Gym, October 14, 1929. The gym was given the effect of a 
large hay loft in a rural community. 

Miss Edith Bockenstette, who had been chosen by the 
students to reign as queen for the evening was escorted to her 
throne by Ed. Habiger, manager of the hop, and was crowned 
queen by Dean L. E. Call. 

OFFICERS 



Ed. Habiger - 


Nlanager 


Leland Sloan 


Assistant Manager 


Sam Alsop 


Treasurer 




Edith Bockenstette 




Vaac 1S5 



Activities 




Bradley 
Chilen 

COYLE 

Dunn 

Durham 
Greene 



Habiger 
Hall 

HoCH 

KiNDIG 

Lynn 

Mantz 



Newman 
Paulsen 
Peck 
Powers 

QUANTIC 



schultis 
Stewart 
Todd 

Williams 



Agriciiltiiral Economics Clut) 

npHE Agricultural Economics club was organized in 1921. Its purpose is to further professional and social interests 
of its members, and to foster a closer relationship and unified spirit among its members and the faculty of the 
department of agricultural economics. 

OFFICERS 

A. P. Grimes President 

W. P. Powers Vice-President 

F. H. ScHULTis ----- Secretary 

H. R. Bradley ----- Treasurer 

W. E. Grimes Facu/ty Advisor 

MEMBERS 

H. R. Bradley K. M. Gapen C. Mantz S. R. Stewart H. Howe O. M. Hardtarfer M. B. Morgan 

G. S. Brookover j. H. Greene L. J. Millei E. E. Stockebrand W. P. Mortenson W. E. Hoffman C. A. Murrell 

M. O. Castle E. O. Hadiger W. M. Newman P. R. Swartz N. Durham K. R. Huyck E. H. Regnier 

P. R. Chilen K. M. Hall L. H. Norton L. F. Taylor K. L. Backus G. R. Kent M. E. Saffry 

W. W. Coffman G. R. Hanson H. A. Paulsen E. Templeton R. W. Berermeyer O. W. Kershaw V. H. Saffry 

F. S. CoYLE E. L. Hartley L. A. Peck C. C. Todd W. Brandenburg B. C. Kohrs O. W. Schoup 

D.A.Dodge H. Hoch H. P. Powers H. H. Voights H.A.Burt W.J.Lynn H. R. Stump 

C. M. Dunn R. M. Hoss W. P. Powers M. Evans S. E. Dale S. McCoy H. C. Williams 

A. H. Epperson A. A.Johnson G. S. Quantic W. E. Grimes H. L. Fatzer M. McMinimy E. A. Winkler 

H. S. Fry E. H.Johnson E. P. Schrag J. A. Hedges H. R. Fatzer A. E. Miller R. A. Zebold 

V. E. Frye MJ- Kindig F. H. Schultis H.J. Henney R. G. Frye H. I. Moore 



Activities 



A LPHA ZETA is an active honorary agricultural fraternity, recognizing character, leadership, and high scholar- 
'^ ship. Second semester sophomore, junior, and senior students are eligible for membership providing their 
grades place them in the upper two-fifths of their class, and that they give promise of becoming leaders in agri- 



OFFICERS 

L, P. Reitz ------- Chancellor 

C. P. McKiNNiE - - - - - - Censor 

R. W. OHara ------- Scnk 

J. W. Decker - Trtasiner 



F. G. ACKERMAN 

}. R. Bentley 
J. W. Decker 
C. C. Eustace 
R. G. Frye 
K. M. Gapen 
R. F. Germann 
H. W. Gilbert 
]. B. Hanna 
R. C. Hay 



O. E. Hays 
H. E. HocH 
R. M. Hoss 
G. C. Isaac 
A . Lambertson 
O. G. I ear 

C. P. McKlNNIE 
W. L. McMuLLEN 

C. Mantz 
W. D. Moore 



W. M. Myers 
C W. Nauheim 
W. G. Nicholson 
G. D. Oberle 
R. W. CHara 
W. P. Powers 
F. J. Raleigh 
L. P. Reitz 
M. R. Salmon 
L. M. Sloan 



A. M. Schlehuber 

F. H. SCHULTIS 

L. Stewart 
S. R. Stewart 

B. R. Taylor 
M. M. Taylor 
J. A. Terrell 
Carl Williams 
J. L. Wilson 

F. ZiTNIK 



Decker 
Eustace 
Gapen 
Germann 
Hays 

HoCH 



Isaac 

Lambertson 
Lear 
Mast 

McKlNNIE 

O'Hara 



Powers 
Raleigh 
Reitz 



iCHLEHUDER 

Schultis 



Stewart 
Taylor 
Terrell 
Williams 




Activities 




Carlson 
Chilen 

Lambertson 

McKlNNIE 



Nutter 
O'Hara 
Paulsen 



Terrell 
schultis 
Yeager' 



and Bridle 

¥N 1914 an organization known as the Jayhawker Saddle and Sirloin Cluh was established on the campus. The 
^ purpose of this club was to promote the livestock industry, aid in animal husbandry departmental activities 
and stimulate student interest in animal husbandry as a profession. In 1921 this club entered the national organiza- 
tion (;f Block and Bridle and became known as the Kansas Chapter of Block and Bridle. 

OFFICERS 

C. Porter McKinnie - - . - Prcadent 

T. H. GiLE ------ Vice-President 

C. E. Nutter Treusitrcr 

J. A. Terrell ----- Secretary 

MEMBERS 

D. A. Carlson C. D. Hershstuser A. H. Stephenson 

Wm. Chapman R M. Hoss E. H. Smith 

Paul Chilen L Lambertson Bruce Taylor 

M. L. Cox C. P. McKinnie j. A. Terrell 

L. A. Eastwood W G. Nicholson G. Washinc;ton 

H. Errington C. E. Nutter John Wilson 

G. M. Fletcher R. W, OHara j. J. Yeager 

T. H. Gii.k F. H. SiHULTis Frank ZiTNiK 

I'afie 13S 



Activities 



Collegiate 4=H Club 

OFFICERS 

Ben Kohrs -------- President 

Ebur Schultz -----.. Vice-President 

Joe Greene ----... Secretary-Treasurer 

Leonard Rees ------- Corresponding Secretary 



npHE Collegiare 4-H Club was organized December 12, 1927, by a group of former 4-H club members and 
leaders attending college. 

The purpose of the organization is to promote a wider acquaintance among its members, to maintain and 
increase their interest in club work, to develop leaders in the field of club work, to aid in any campus activity 
relating to club work, to further the best interests of K. S. A. C, and influence other club members to come to 
this school. 

During the first semester of the organization's existence the club set as a goal the establishment of a 4-H 
Club Loan Fund for 4-H club members attending college. This goal was reached on December 20, 1929, when 
the club gave the alumni association the sum of $1000 for administration. 

In the fall of 1928, the club took charge of the publication of Who's Whoot, a year book of Kansas 4-H 
club members and their achievements. Fifteen hundred copies of the book were printed and distributed to all 
the state club departments and the club members attending the state 4-H Club Round Up in the spring. 

The club fosters the broadcasting of 4-H club programs over the radio every Monday, Wednesday, and 
Friday. The aim of these programs is to interest 4-H club members throughout the state and elsewhere, and 
acc]uaint them with college activities. 

In addition to its social functions, the club has been active in men's and women's intramural athletics, 
Aggie Orpheum, Farm and Home Week, and the Diamond Jubilee. 




SniiLI.ing, WiLi.iAMh, SoiuLiz, AcKi-.KMAN, L)h:ki-.n. Painh.k, I 

Wri.LIAM. R[il-S, JollN.SON, KoHRS. C'l.UTTKR. C^OIH TKR. Ill, I. INC., 

CoNOF.R, CoK. Griffejh. Shikr. Cohorst. Rf;(;NiF:R. Boom. Ba 
Tf.dman, Starhuck. Iiu-kman. Wii son. ['ainti-r. Fry, .'Vi i i-n 



Activities 




/^ f^ f^ 





AxTELL 

Braun 

Cunningham 
Curtis 



Decker 

EuSTANCE 

Germann 
Greene 



Isaac 
Jacobson 
Myers 
Raleigh 



Reitz 

Schlehuber 
Taylor 



ana iveriiel 

THE Klod and Kernel Klub was organized April 6, 1917. It is composed of faculty and students in the department 
of agronomy. The programs which are presented at each meeting are so planned that they will promote friend- 
ship among the members and increase interest in the agronomy profession. The club sponsors a student crops- 
judging contest each year and takes an active part in the annual Ag Fair. 

OFFICERS 

J. E. Taylor ------ President 

Harlan Stevens ----- Vice-President 

W. ]. Braun ------ Secretary 

J.J.CuRTTS ------ Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

F. G. AcKERMAN R. F. Germann W. M. Myers 
H. F. AxTELL .). H. Greene J. D. Oderle 

J. R. Bentley J. B. Hanna 'W. H. Painter 

J. S. Boyer O. E. Hays L. P. Reitz 

W.J. Braun C. A. Hollingsworth A. M. Schlehuder 

L. L. Compton W. H. Houston E. S. Schultz 

G. J. CuNNiN(iH\M J. W. Hunter L.M.Sloan 
j. J. Curtis D. C. Isaac H. Stevens 
J. D. Decker L. A. Jacodson |. E. Taylor 
T. D, Dicken W.D.'Lyon E. L. Wier 
C. C. Eustace M. L. Macaw C. A. Wismer 

A . A . M AST 

Pane v,0 



Activities 



:. E. E. 



npHE American Institute of Electrical Engineers is the national organization representing the electrical engineering 
■^ profession. 







MEMBERS 




Theo. Appl 


L. N. Lydick 


H.J. Besler 


J. H. Kershaw 


B. E. Atwood 


E. McCuLLEY 


H. C. Boley 


C. M. KoPF 


D. Banks 


C. J. McMuLLEN 


J. F. BozicK 


L. Lewis 


E. W. Bennett 


C.'W. Naylor 


E. H. Bredehoft 


J. Ley 


Wm. Boggess 


B. D. Neiman 


J. L. Brubaker 


H. G. Mangelsdorf 


E. J. Branham 


R. J. Pafford 


L. Burton 


W. R. Mitchell 


R. E. Brunke 


L. Paramore 


A. L. Coats 


C. Newman 


W. Chamberlin 


R. C. Paulson 


G. Combs 


G. C. NONKEN 


B. I. Cousins 


E. Peterson 


W. L. Criswell 


M. G. Ott 


M. A. COWLES 


E. R. Randle 


P. Davis 


A. E. Owen 


H. E. Davidson 


F. Roth 


M. C. Fleming 


L. ]. Owsley 


W. R. Denman 


Jack Sanders 


M. B. Franklin 


L. C. Paslay 


K. Engler 


C, A. Schubert 


H. B. Geiman 


B. R. Prentice 


K. Ernst 


K. Shaver 


C. E. Glasco 


L. Quigiey 


S. W. Graham 


H. Shomber 


R. B. Heckert 


J. S. Rhodes 


K. D. Grimes 


A. L. Steele 


P. R. Heinback 


C. D. Richardson 


G. H. Jenkins 


I. R. Stenzle 


G. R. HozACK 


G. E. Richardson 


L. R. KiRKWOOD 


C. Thudin 


J. W. Ingraham 


A. H. Ryon 


A. E. KiRBY 


H. E. Trekell 


V, E. Jefferies 


E. P. Smoot 


M. KlEHBIEL 


M. F. Weckell 


J. H. Karr 


E. H. Thom 








F. W. TOOMEY 



Boggess 
Bredehoft 



Bri 



Denman 



Ernst 
Karr 

Mangelsdorf 
Owsley 



Paslay 
Peterson 
Smith 
Toomey 




Activities 




CoBERLY 

Ghormley 

Smith 



St/ 



Stevens 
Winters 



.. E. 



npHE purpose of this society is to promote the interests, broaden the knowledge, and provide for social gatherings 
■^ of those who are studying the art and science of engineering as applied to agriculture at K. S. A. C. 



H.J. Barre 
E. H. Smith 



E. F. Clark 
G. R. Shier 

A. H. Dawson 
]. A. Nielsen 
C. W. Stewart 



D. Bowmai 
G. Irvine 
H. R. New 



H. P. CoBERLY 

D. E. Springer 



N. B. Geer 
K. A. Wehl 



R. I. Denny 

H. N. Stapleton 



R. C. Hay 
J. I. Wilcoxen 



SENIORS 
C. E. Ghormley 
H. C. Stevens 

JUNIORS 

E. E. Karns 

F. G. Winters 



O. W. Howe L. J. Kovar 

V. S. Peterson O. French 



C. W. Kewley 



SOPHOMORES 
G. L. Ellithorpe G. E. Feldhausen K. M. Fones W. C. Hinkle 

L. D. Pierce J. Province J. M. Richardson J. Roberts 

E. A. Taylor H. B. Wooten A. L. Casey 



F. M. BozAH 
P. Jenicek 
O. Olinoer 



FRESHMEN 

C. CARLCiREN D. Christy V. E. DeGeer 

S. H. Keller C. H. Kent J. L. Mann 

R. C. Peterson L. Rupener E. O. Schwab 



O. M. Mohney 



H. O. McManis 



R. N. Selby 



L. W. Hurlbut A. V. Jackson 

H. F. Rowland W. E. Shelor 



H. a. Duffy D. D. FuLKERS0^ 

E. H. Massenoill a. W. Mosher 
R. G. White E. F. Yoxall 



Page H2 



Activities 



'. E. 



npHE student of civil engineering may participate in some of the advantages of membership in the American 
Society of Civil Engineers by joining a student chapter. It will give him familiarity with the organization 
and work of the society, develop his ability to present technical subjects in a clear and forceful manner, and help 
him acquire parliamentary skill in conducting meetings. 



First Semester 
C. O. Baker 
R. A. St. John 
Howard JoBE 
V, R. Weathers 

A. B. LiTVIEN 



OFFICERS 

President - 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Ser^eant-at-arm 



Second Semester 
Howard Jobe 
T. W. Hicks 

J. A. KuFFLER 
C. W. KOERNER 
A. B. LiTVIEN 



MEMBERS 



G. M. Allen 
C. O. Baker 
C. P. Clayton 

H. C. COWDERY 

R. L. Fossnight 

R. J. FURBECK 

C. G. Gates 
R. L. Hartman 



SENIORS 
T. W. Hicks 

R. W. HOFSESS 

H.J. Jobe 
J. A. Kuffler 

A. B. LiTVIEN 

H. D. LoTT 
A. M. Meyers 
M. E. Miller 



B. E. Ramsey 
R. A. St. John 

B. T. Stryker 

Z. H. Tessendorf 

C. C. Uhl 

G. R. Vanderpool 
V. R. Weathers 
H. A. Coleman 



W. |. Arndt 
H. b. Boles 
W. R. Chalmers 
E. F. Collins 

H. R. CORLE 

D. Curtis 
W. R. Downs 

W. S. Evans 



JUNIORS 
I. H 



Harris 

Harness 

Harvey 

HuNSBERGER 

Kepley 
King 

KiPFER 

Koerner 



V. H. Meseke 
T. D. Morgan 
C. C. Parrish 
C. A. Pine 
C. A. Rife 
W. E. Steps 
C. W. Stewart 
C. M. Worthy 



Baker 
Boles 
Clayton 
Comfort 

CoWDERY 

Fossnight 



Hartman 

HoFSESS 

Jobe 
King 

LiTVIEN 
LoTT 



Miller 
Parrish 
Pine 
Ramsey 

Steps 



Tessendorf 
Uhl 

Vanderpool 
Worthy 




Activities 




Stapleton 

NONKEN 

McBuRNEY 

Trekell 



Brainard 
Lydick 
Baker 



Beck 

Walker 

GUNN 



Kansas State Engineering Association 

npHE engineering association has a membership of all the engineers in the division, numbering about a thousand 
■^ during the year. The association is governed by an executive council made up of representatives from all 
departments. The aim of the organization is to foster all activities in the engineering division and create among 
the engineering students a better spirit. Among the activities are the publication of The Kansas State Engineer, 
the traditional cleaning of the "K" each year by the freshmen, and the presentation of the Engineer's open house. 



H. N. Stapleton 

G. C. NoNKEN 

Ed McBurney 
H. E. Trekell 
C. L. Brainard 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

M iHiiger Open House 



L. N. Lydick 
C. O. Baker - 
Vernon Beck 
H. N. Stapleton 



A. I. E. E. 
A. S.C. E. 
A. S. M. E. 
A. S. A. E. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



R. Walker - 
Chas. Gunn 
C. L. Brainard 
Vernon Beck - 



Gargoyle Club 
Flour Mill Engineering 
Editor, Kansas State Engina 
Manager, Kansas State Engi 



Page Ihh 



FALL FEATURES 



Miss Frances Jones 
Fall Queen 




y 



y. 



U 



V 



►'^ 



11 



t.^ 



r^^.' iLii 



s 



Haw! Haw! Haw! Didn't we have 
fun on those fine crisp mornings in 
October when the power house 
whistle warned of a raid from the 
Jayhawkers. At the left we see the 
bogus Kansas City Star reporters 
cleaning the paint off the greenhouse 
windows. This was just before they 
received a treatment from the senior 
vets, and did they smell! Pheu! The 
other pictures are just glimpses of 
the greatest hair cutting orgy that 
has ever struck eastern Kansas, and 
it was surely worth the money. 
Above IS pictured a short interrup- 
tion m the parade of 23 prisoners of 
war downtown, while below we see 
the front end of the advance party 
reaching Lawrence on that memor- 
able day. 



m^^ 



n_ 



S*^.' % 



f^\ 



:^r. 



.*^li 



^ ■ 



While the Aggies were cutting more 
hair than they knew what to do with, 
the Jayhawkers were having a big time 
with the two unfortunates who were 
caught in Lawrence, Cotton Tietze and 
John Merritt. They got a taste of the 
cleaning, too, and a touch of head- 
shaving and head painting thrown in 
for good measure. Above at the right 
we see Lindley's army collected to pro- 
tect the honor of the school. What 
might have happened if a dozen Aggies 
had gone down? 

Just below the statue of the Kansas 
Pioneer seems to have been caught in a 
sudden storm of fresh white duck soup 
of some constituency, and then plas- 
tered with the famous motto before he 
could get dry! 



§1/ 



>-$¥-' 
•^f^,^ 



f. ^ 



mm 



'V^. 



SA»>^^ 



l!l 



11 



.*1 



4^ 



^t-^^ J ^ BJ 



*^ - 



'Tea ?/ '^ . l^MaEF'Hi^r— — 






m 



^ 



wi%fi 



'!f) .^ 



f-B^-e^ 



Clear, cool, autumn days — what glorious 
football weather! Aggies returning from 
the games away from home found a peppy 
crowd at the station to meet them, 
whether they won or lost. Near the top, 
Hoxie and Bo Peep strike up an acquaint- 
ance, while just below Bo Peep poses with 
her chief ward and worry, old Bo himself. 
The Wampus Cats staged their bicycle race 
to determine the championship of the Big 
Six, but somehow it didn't come out that 
way. At the left the Aggies are seen just 
after they arrived in Milwaukee, while 
just below Quigley flips to see which goal 
the Wildcats will defend. 



K:^^ 



s^». 






-u 



m-» 



'^^IPij 



i-y^. 



iii 



The Aggies prepared to meet the old 
grads with a lot of cordiality during 
Homecoming, and to make the welcome 
a good one. they decorated the houses in 
an attractive fashion. The Sig Eps won 
the prize with their emulation of the 
drive to the Oklahoma territory. Others 
who used the covered wagon idea were 
the Phi Delts and the A. T. O.s and 
the Alpha Rho Chis. The Phi Kappa 
Taus took a step forward and placed 
an old Ford (vintage unknown) in their 
front yard. Those entering the Sig Alph 
door walked through the mouth of a 
giant wildcat, while the front entrances 
of Delta Tau and Phi Kappa were ad- 
orned with huge letters. 



r? 



WELCOME 



/:''i^ 



;i'#^M| 



r- 



r> «. 



OLArl<- 






i^Sf^flS^: 






^r .<" \ 



iM^'^ 



""^m. 



'it^^m: 



m{m\ 



.^' 






% "M 



fffJ^Ai* 



%11%1 



lu 



■r^«i^ 




Manhattan's Diamond Jubilee was 
held in celebration of the founding 
of the city, and it was signally suc- 
cessful. On the day of the big 
parade, there were real oxen, real 
Injuns, and huge floats of all kinds. 
Among the most beautiful were those 
of the Manhattan Kiwanis Club, the 
Cress Hudson Company, the Lon^ 
Oil Company, and the float in- 
viting those present to attend the 
gigantic bridge dedication at Wamego 
a little later in the fall. The college 
band and the several organizations of 
the R. O. T. C. as well as the cavalry 
units of Fort Riley helped to make 
the parade impressive. 




It was really too bad that the Blackbird 
Party could not be successful in the fall 
elections. Their platform was more 
worthy of consideration by the student 
body than either of those presented by 
the other parties, but those horrid old 
politicians just wouldn't let the best 
party win. Above, Dorothy Simpson 
locates a point with her transit, and 
below the other girl members of the 
engineering division pose for the Royal 
Purple photographer. Above at the 
right Alex (Tony) Nigro attempts to 
sell his wares, while his other Phi 
Kappa brothers look on with interest. 
The freshmen parade in the center, and 
clean the K at the right. Alpha Zeta 
pledges, with forks on their shoulders 
prepare to clean out the chapter house. 



iEBlfefelRDIMY 



5mND2 FOR 

L A BLACKBrnD^^'' PATROL 
aCOriBimNG^OFVETA'HeAlJH OePT6. 
3.No^RABE5 BeUOW C, 

4Mo 1^ HowR NOR Sat. cias^^ 5 . 
snout Snappy Breezes a«w«o ^Hooit, 

6.CIORE 'Pia.TOt.OPERA^"AT Sat. 5HOWS 



CHIEF Patrolman. 

PATROLMAN 
\\ INSPECTOR 
jicL Pi&eoN 
^>/AIN QemOVER 
' Chiff Pilot 
^ ^ 1 '\i C] 




^ 



pp 






Scabbard and Blade and Mortar and Bal 
honorary military fraternities, put their 
neophites through hell week, and what 
we mean is that it really was hell week! 
Zeke Richardson, lance corporal of the 
Scabbard and Blade animals, occupies a 
prominent place in the snapshots on this 
page. Tony Borecky, the ideal whitewing, 
looks for work on the right, Ernest Jenista 
offers highest prices for old clo'es and old 
shoos on the left. Above, the Mortar and 
Ball pledges look like a bunch of tough 
bebies, and really mean it. Truly these 
were two weeks of entertainment for the 
student body, who shuddered at the 
thought of onion and tobacco chewing. 





^i^«-U^.. 




"^ \ 



BOOK TWO 



li\k \S 



„!.*W**^*^ 





\j MAKING THE SOPHOMORES 
AND JUNIORS SHIVER . , HE WEL- 
COMES SWIFT BASKET BALL, AND 
THE LESSER SPORTS , . SORORITIES 
THERE ARE. AND MANY BEAUTIES 
CLUBS AND LITERARY SOCIETIES 
HOLD SERIOUS MEETINGS, WHILE 
MANY PLAY THROUGH WINTER'S 
WANDERINGS - COME ALONG 
AND JOIN THE FUN . 



w 






N 




T 



E 



iu"tet*pf;v■;|;^'«^ ,^.J_ 



R 






Sophomores 





Cross Cronkite Filson 

SoDliomore 

First Semes' ey 

WiLLARD Hemker _-_--___ President 

Merle Mark --- Vice-President 

Burton Scott --------- Treasurer 

Marion Cross --------- Secretary 

Henry Cronkite -------- Marshall 

Eva Fil'^;on --------- Historian 

Second Semester 

Lee Toadvine --------- President 

Lawrence Morgan ------- Vice-President 

Vera Bowersox --------- Secretary 

Carl Ossmann --------- Treasurer 

Lloyd Boley - - - - -- - - - M^nh.tll 

Mor(;an Bo\vi;rs()\ CXssmann Boi i 

Page 153 




Sophomores 





VIVIAN ALBRlGirr JOHN L. AF^MS IRONG WM. A. BAIRD, JR. GRACE BARGHR L. D. Blil INKE 

Nctawaka Salina lopcka Gardcid Bushiun 



EARL BBNNKR MAR^' KATI lERINE BIRD EDIIl I BOCKENSTETIE RA^'MOND BOLES GEORGE BOONE. 

Wcilon. Mo, Hays Sahctha Lilicral Manli 



ALBER I II BOIER ARI LIUR BR(.)DINE R.V.BROWN AILEEN V. BRUNSON MARGARET BUCK 

Wclda Salina Manhattan Dcllvalc Derby 



BOYD CAIIIflARI JAMES P CHAI'MAN L.E.COLLIER HELEN COOK LUCILE (.XiRRIil I 

Winchcslcr Manhattan ArJrnore, Okla. MonLimcnt Manl' 



Page 15 U 



Sophomores 





▼ ^i ^5 '^ ^ ■ 1 







Al 



lf^ 




! i'\ 



MARY JO CORTHLYOU ARYLES DAWSON 

Manhatlan Tul 



D D DOT^ 



1XISENBLIR^■ ETHEL EBERl lART 

Anthony lopckt 



ANNA MARIE EDWARDS MARGARET LiLDER I lARi )1T) I- A IZER 1 lUBER 1 I- A I ZER EEMA l-ILSeiN 

ALhol Hulchins,,n I'cllsburg Ecllsburt; SchHI C. 



EVA FIl,S(_)N W>()NA FLORl-NCI 

Scott Cjiy Mi. 



BLUa.Al 1 M ER^' 



:(WARi^ c;;arrks(in cl^'de^s ge rr> 



GEORGIA I IA\1M VI Kt .1! I XI ■ I lANES A B I IIIDEBREt ;i 1 I WIN AKDIIIM 

I lunilioklt AuKUb.ta Ikiiilci 



W AI 1 I R G 1 IINKL 



Sophomores 





VER LEE HOTZ ADOL.PH R. HRABA CLARENCE HUBBS HELEN HUGHES ELECTA HULL 

Dodge City Easl St. Louis, 111. Manhattan Manhattan Manhattan 



VIRGIL JACKSON LUTHER J ACOBSON AMY JASPERSON NAOMI JOI INSON WENDELL JOHNSON 

Lenora Horton Cobly Oskaloosa Axtell 



Z.W.JOHNSON W. LAURIE JONES VINCENT J. KELLEY LONNIE KEMPER G.R.KENT 

Beeler SaUna Chapman Wichita Wakefield 



RUSSELL A. KERN 

Juncli.jn C 



WILLARD KERSHAW 
Gar 



D KIRKMAN BENJAMIN KOHRS O M KOONTZ 

Hays Dilli.n Jclmorc 



Page 156 



Sophomores 





EDWIN KOTAPISH THEO, A. KURTENBACH JULIA LAN4B RACHEL LAMPRECHT BENJAMIN LANTZ 

Irving Lindsay, Nebr. Blue Rapids \4anhattan Salina 



II. IP (V l.AUTZ MINNIE LAUE MARJORIL I.YLES LORE IFA McCCM-^MICK ZADA McCUTCHEON 

La Junta, Colo. [..yndon SaCfordville Plains\illc Kingman 



MUR I L\ MAKINS MERLE MARK B, E. MARKLEY 1-RANK MAR UN MILDRED M.ASDEN 

Abilene Abilene Bennington Manhaiiaii Lcnora 



E. R MASON MARCjAREr MAIl ll-:WS C:, W. MEAGl lER J.WMENZIE ST.-XNLE^' MERRII L 

Wakefield Manhattan Wamego Manhattan .\bilene 



Sophomores 







ARCH E. MILLER VERNA L MILLER W.M.MYERS L ILL IE OLSON C. G. OSSMAN 

Cottunwood Ealls Milford Bancroft Manhattan Concordi: 



CLIEFORD PALMQUIST ROBERT PEUETZE CHARLES POWELL ESTHER QUENZER E. G. RADER 

Concordia Manhattan Frankfort Bazine Severy 



ROYCE S. REARWIN LEONARD REES CHARLOTTE REM I CK H I.ROWLAND HARLAN RHODES 

Salina Abilene Manhaitan Clav Center Manhat 



MILDRED JO RHODES R C RoIIRDANZ ANNA RUESCHHOI-F 

Tampa Bala Gi 



JOHN H. RUST MARLIN SCHRADER 

Manhattan Olivet 



EUNICE SCIHROETER H.J.SCHWARTZ OLIVER SELFRIDGE RLI 1 1 1 SILKENSEN JOSEPHINE SKINNER 

Ellinwood Hanover St. John Dell Rapids, S. D. Topeka 



Page 158 



Sophomores 




k.^A 





J* 




1^ R ^aamm^ ^mmtgl^^ t,i^'^ 







'M^ 




FRIIiDA A SLOOP 



OE SMERCHEK 



IIMilE SMEKC 



< BRUCI- SMI IH 

CjarnL'tt 1 loislngton 



EDNA SOCOl-OFSKY R. W. SPIKER ALVIN H. Sl'EPHENSON ROLAND SWE,NSON \VI 111 Nli^ I'r.AL 

Tampa Manhuuan Ck-mcnls Cuiuirrun 



■N ILK J igraebl:r 



C.liOROII- VOSl IL 



I nil IMME 
Ll I.c 



K4an 
ELEANOR WOMER 



IRF.NE TODD 



IVAN VVL:I I "1 



D. E WEST 



ClTiA \AN ml: LL.R 



('LARE \\ILSi)N 
lorJ Oinaga 



HLT.liN K WlANL 
J. D, WOODRULE I opcku 

Agra Dt)Jge City 



Juniors 




SlOCKEBRAND NeLSON CriMES 



Smith Widestrand l-RAzrER 



Junior ^uiass 

First Sei/iester 

EsRA Stockebrand -------- President 

Ruby Nelson - -- - - - - - Vice-President 

Kenneth Grimes __-_---- Treasurer 

MiNA Mae Skillin ------- Secretary 

Elbert W. Smith -------- Marshall 

Ruth Widestrand ------- Historian 

Harry Frazier --------- Prom Manager 

Second Semester 

CM. Rhoades --------- President 

Helen Randall -------- Vice-President 

Leota Shields --------- Secretary 

Del Price --------- Treasurer 

Sam Alsop ---------- Marshall 




Page lei 



Jumors 





SAM E. ALSOI^ LESTER ANDERSON THEO^ A. APPL MAHALA ARGANBRIGHT 
Agriculture General Sciervce Electrical Engineering Home Economics 

Wakefield Dodge City Bisun Wamego 

KIMBALL L BACKUS BEN W. BARBER ROBERT A BICKEL HAROLD BOLES 

Agriculture Agricultural Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering 

Olathe Alton Kansas City Madison 



JAMES P. BONFIELD GERTRUDE BRILL GEORGE S BROOKOVER VADA BURSON 

Commerce Horjie Economicx Agriculture General Science 

Elmo Westmoreland Eureka Manhattan 



Paf/e IS 2 



Juniors 





RUTH CLIINCY I RANK R. CONDELL MAR-^' NACWII CCK^K 

General Science Mechanical Engineering I nduslnal Journali. 

Manhattan HI Dorado 



JOI IN T. CC'JRRIILl. 

lndu.str,al Che, 



ELI E. DAMAN 
Con 



MARGARET DARDEN 
General Science 



J.IAN DAUCU II 'R \Y 

Puhlli SJlool A/l/A 



Fort Riley 



GEORGIA DAVID 

Home Economics 

Bartlcsvillc. Okla. 



NELLIE DILSAVER HELEN LAURA DODGE 

Home Economics Physical Eiliicalwn 

Kensington ManI 



ATRINA ESKELDSON \ERNA E\ELI-IGII 

//,.„U' luonomu.s Physual EJiicahon 

RariH)na Bovd 



Pa ye 16S 



Juniors 





LUD FISER MAX C. FLEMING HARRY FRAZIER J. G GARVER 

Physical Education Electrical Engineering General Science Agricultural Administration 

Mahaska Paola IJana Abilene 

RALPH F. GERMANN WILLIAM L GORRFLL RUTH E. GRAHAM K D. GRIMES 

Agriculture Architectural Engineering Applied Art Electrical Engineering 

Fairview Onaga Manhattan Topeka 



CARROLL A HADLEY VELMA HAHN JOHN LHEIMERICH HARVEY E. HOCH 

Architecture Public School Music Architectural Engineering Agruulturol Administration 

Wichita Idana Clay Center Alta Vista 



Juniors 




%g ^rT W^ 



Mg^ 




ma 




FLORENCE JAMES GERALDINE JOHNSTON K4ILDRED JONES Lr-:ROY KEPLEY 

Home Economics Physical Educalion Commerce Cii'il Engineering 

New England, N. D. Manhatlan Clay Center Chanute 

FAY KIMES L:)(>K(V|'I ll-A Kl.l-IN NORMA E, KCX^NS ALONZO LAMBERTSON 

Hleclrical Engineering In.luMiuil Cluinislry Home luonomus Agncullure 

Dodge Cily Topeka Sharon Springs l-"air\ icw 

lawrenc;e lewis j. e, li:^ helen lichty area m<.,blirni:>- 

Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering Home Economics General Science 

Hays Sharon Springs Sahelha Maiihalian 



Page 165 



Juniors 





AGNES McC'.LAREN MAYME McCRANN M. S. McCULLOH 

Public School Music Gcncnd Science Commc 

Galena Manhattan 



A, SIDNEY McINTlRE 
Mechanical Bngincc 



RO")' II. M..KIBBEN DOROTin' MAGEE OLNEY MOHNEY H E, MARIIN 

Mechanical Engineering General Science Agricultural Engineering Architeclurc 

Kansas City Guddard Sawyer Eskridge 



MARJORIE MAUZY RUBY NELSON CLYDE NEWMAN 

Commerce Physical EJucalion Eleclrical Engineering 

Alchjson Jamestown Hollo] 



DOROTHY E. NORRIS 



Page 1C6 



Juniors 




1^^ 




DOROII n ()l>,Ri:CHT MARVIN G. OTT CLEMONT C. PARRISH ALBERT A. PEASE 

I !oinc licononucs HUxlnc.d Bnginccnng Civil Engineering Agricullurc 

Topeka Madison Radium Fort Sec 



L. A I'ECK 

Agricullurul .\,h, 



HELEN J PEMBLETdN ALICE PEPPIATT MARION E, PHILLIPS 

"1 General Science Home Economics Civil Engineering 

Soldi(r Ness City Ellsworth Scott Cii 



BARIiARA jl-AN POLLOCK DoRINI: POR I l.R MILDRL.D PORTER 

General Science Home luonomux llome ELonomu.s 

Topeka Stallord N 



OPAL MAE PORTER 

Home Economu:- 



^^^li^^^^^^^^i^i 



Page 167 



Juniors 





CLAIRIi; PRICE MILDRED PURCELL HELEN MARIE RANDALL EFFIE RASHER 

St^ccial Physical Educalion Public School Music Physical Education 

EreJonia Manhaltun Ashland Sdlomun 

ANNA REED 

General Scicmc WIl.LARD V. REDDING JOHN REVER HAR( )IJ^ RICHARDSON 

Kanopolis Agriculture Electrical Engineering General Science 

Coffey villc Parsons l-ong Island 

CLARENCE A RINARD ESTHER ROCKEY MAF^EL RUTHI ROBERT RYCHEL 

Architecture Industrial Journalism Home Economics Electrical Enznu-ering 

Salina Manhattan BlouniiiiKton Downs 



Juniors 





PAULINE SAMUEL FLOSSIE SAWYER 

Physical Education Home Economics 

Manhattan Kensing 



DONALD F. SCHAFER 



A. M. SCHLEHL'BER 

Agncidlurc 
Fort Scott Durh, 



MILDRED SCHWEITER MILDRED SEDERLIN DALE H. SIELING 

General Science General Science Industrial Che 

Wichita Scandia 



ESTELLA SI 1ENKEL 

General Sc.-nce 
Hays Gcnc;co 



FRANCES II. SIMPSON MINA MAE SKILLIN I II:LEN SLOAN 

Industrial Journalism Physical Education Industrial Jounuihsm 

McPherson 1-ranklort 1 lut 



■:LBER'I W SMIII 

C:nl Enon 



2^^^^ 



Page 169 



Juniors 





MARIE SPERLING 

Industrial Journal, 



MARJORIE SIAEFORD C, A. STANLEY 

General Science Electrical Er 

Lc-onai-Jvillc 



ESRA E. S roCKEBRAND 

Ap^ricullural .\lnunistralwn 

"latcs C:cnt 



1 lAROLD I A^LOR 

Industrialjournali. 



K i: lETER LUCILLE 11 ILIS 

Mechanical Engineerinf. Home Economic 

El Doraclc. O 



H E IREKELL 

Electrical Engineer, ni^ 
Belle 



SAMUEL UNGER 
Chemical Er 



LUELLI.A VANDERPOOL HELEN VAN PELT 

ing Home Economics Physical EJucalion 

El D.raJo Mfadc I', 



)LIVE. VAN PI-:LI 

PuH,^ .School A/i/.s 



Juniors 




RALPl I VOHS 

Phv-sual Educali. 



VERA WALKI-R VIIS PA \VALI<1:K F. M, WARNKCN 

Inlu.slruiljotiinuli.u,! I nJu^lnal J ounudisn, General Sc 

Wukccncv Wakccricv 



CARL WILLIAMS I^L;AIRI(L \V( m )n\\()R I 1 I CLAIK \\(>KII1V 

Agruullural ,\Un>,ni.slration Home Lton,mu,.s Cnil LnKnwenng 

Dodge City Coming Wcini. 



fttiS.iiS;? 



Pane 171 




Charles Corsaut 
Basketball Coach 



OINCE 1923, Coach Charles Corsaut has served in a duo-mentor role as head coach of basketball and baseball 
at Kansas State and since that time has put out many creditable teams in both sports. The basketball team 
of the past season won nine and lost seven games, six of the seven losses coming in the conference. The 
Wildcats finished in fifth place in the conference this season but did so because of the lack of natural basket 
shooting. Corsaut came to K. S. A. C. from Kansas City, Kansas, high school where he put out a national 
championship high school team. He has never been blessed with basketball material but this year put out a 
team which upset the champions in one of their two reversals of the season in one of the most thrilling games 
ever witnessed on the Nichols gym court. Corsaut had one of the best defensive teams in the conference but the 
team lacked on the offense. The Big Six race during the past season was one of the closest ever and there was 
little difference between the first and last place teams. Coach Corsaut's team showed great power in non- 
conference games throughout the season and he developed a number of promising sophomores that should 
make creditable records in the next two years. 



BIG SIX BASKETBALL STANDING 



Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

Iowa State 

Kansas State 

Oklahoma LIniversity 



Von 


Lost 


Pet. 


8 


2 


.800 


7 


3 


.700 


6 


4 


.600 


5 


5 


.500 


4 


6 


.400 





10 


.000 



Page 172 



'^mmmi^^m^ 




"^ 




C. D. Richardson 

Capain 1919 -W 




Alex Nigro 
Capain 1930-31 



Basketball 



f~^LEM D. RICHARDSON, Hugoton, led the Kansas Aggie basketball team in their 1930 invasions and 
proved to be one of the outstanding players in the Big Six conference, making a number of the mvthical 
selections. Clem was a guard that was always alert on the defense and a sure scoring power on the offense. 
He was one of the highest scorers of the Aggie five, although he played guard throughout the season. Clem 
was a quiet sort of a leader, but very serious and received the backing of the entire basketball squ.id in his 
work. He made two letters in basketball and will be greatly missed next season. 

An honor was bestowed on Alex Nigro that has been rare in athletic circles at Kansas State. ,\ffcr being 
elected football captain in the fall, fellow members of the basketball squad vested the same honor upon him, 
and he will lead the Wildcat five on the court next year. He was a good forward, being the high point m.in of 
the Aggie team throughout the season. He was a great fighter and saved several conllicts for the Aggies h\ his 
"never-give-up" spirit which carried him on. Much is expected of the Aggie leader next scast)n and ('o.uh 
Corsaiit hopes to develop a team around him. 



^mmm 



Basketball 



np AKING off to an early lead, Coach Corsaut's Aggies 
^ triumphed over the St. Marys Knights in the court season 
opener at St. Marys by a score of 36 to 18 with Nigro leadmg 
the attack. Leading 23 to 7 at the half the Aggies had little 
trouble and Coach Corsaut used his entire squad. Auker and 
Richardson starred at guards. Another romping victory was 
scored in the same week of pre-season games when the Wildcats 
trimmed Kansas Wesleyan at Salina by a score of 32 to 19, 
with Nigro again leading the scoring and Captain Richardson 
close behind. Silverwood looped three field goals in a short 
period of time while in the game. Cronkite looked like a valu- 
able offensive man, getting three field goals. Two more scalps 
were hung to the cagers' belts when they invaded Colorado 
soil early in January to defeat the Colorado college five 53 to 
34 and 35 to 28. Nigro and Silverwood were offensive stars 
with 14 and 17 points respectively, while the guarding of 
Auker and Richardson during the last half was exceptionally 
good. In the second game Richardson, Silverwood, and Nigro 
were offensive stars, Richardson scoring 11 points, Silverwood 
ten and Nigro eight. Auker played a great defensive game 
at his guard post and Russell played a good floor game. 
Cronkite's work around the basket was also good. 




Red" Schooley 
Guard 

Geo. Wiggins 
Guard 

Eldon Auker 
Guard 



Basketball 




ITNABILITY to hit the hoop from the free thrown line cost 
■^ the Aggies the opening Big Six basketball game with 
Nebraska on the home court by a score of 41 to 39. The game 
was thrilling throughout with each team holding the lead 
several times and the score being tied five times. Silverwood 
was the Aggie high point man while Grace led the Husker 
basket slingers. In their second Big Six game, the Wildcats 
were lost on the new court at Columbia dropping one to the 
Tigers 34 to 21. A ragged offense failed to function well and 
the defense failed to stop Charley Huhn of "Mizzou." 
Cronkite was left at home because of illness. In a game full 
of fouls, 29 being called on both teams, the Wildcats triumphed 
over the Oklahoma Aggies in a non-conference game on the 
Aggie court 47 to 35- The game was a wild offensive affair 
with Nigro getting 15 points and Richardson nine. The 
Aggies eeked out of the cellar position by defeating Oklahoma 
university in a fast, wild tilt on the home court by a score of 
24 to 23. Captain Churchill of the Sooners bore the brunt 
of their attack with ten points and a great defensive game, 
but Auker, Cronkite, and Nigro made enough points for a 
narrow victory. The floor work of Russell and the guarding 
of Auker and Captain Richardson were also supreme. 



'Kerm" Silverwood 
Forivard 

Alex Nigro 
Forward 

Ralph XOns 
Citiard 




Basketball 



iT^ OMING up against a kind of defense that they could not 
^-^ penetrate, the Aggies fell before the Iowa State Cyclones 
at Ames by a count of 37 to 21. Cronkite was the only Wildcat 
able to hit the basket, getting nine of the points and being the 
only player to score more than one field goal. Moving on 
to Nebraska the next night, the Aggies were "hot," and ran 
up a 46 to 42 victory over the Huskers on their home court. 
Nigro and Russell each scored eight held goals and Cronkite 
scored three and three free throws. Maclay with 19 points 
was the high Nebraska scorer. An eight time tied battle was 
won by the Jayhawks in the state fued on the Aggie court by 
a score of 19 to 26 before a capacity crowd of more than 3,000. 
It was the floor work and basket shooting of Bishop that 
defeated the Aggies. Auker, breaking upjayhawk plays and 
grabbing the ball from his opponents was the Aggie star, 
although Captain Richardson was the high scorer with 11 
points. The clever basketball team from St. Louis university 
displayed by far the best basketball seen on the Aggie court 
the whole season in overturning the Aggies 35 to 28. Clever 
short passes and accurate shooting of Captain Oldfield, Strong 
and Joyce won approval of the Aggie fans. Richardson, 
Nigro, Russell, and Cronkite led the Aggie attack. 




"Hoxie" Frkeman 

Center 



Basketball 



1^ 




"Hank" Cronkite 

Caita- 

"Doc" WiCLLER 

I'onv.n-d 

"Cli;m" Richardson 
(laprain, (i/uivcl 



¥ N THE biggest upset of the entire season, the Kansas Aggies 
•^ beat the Missouri Tigers 37 to 35 in an overtime battle on 
the Aggie court in one of the two reversals for the Tigers in 
their championship season. Trailing 17 to 7 at the half, the 
Aggies showed a revived spirit and came back in the final 
period to run up 30 points. The Aggies scored ten points in 
three minutes of play in the second half. It was Nigro, 
Russell, Richardson, and Freeman who did the work for the 
Aggies with Freeman caging the two winning baskets. The 
Wildcats gave the Jayhawks another scare at Lawrence when 
they battled them to a close 30 to 32 game which ended in 
the favor of the university team. The play of "Hoxie" 
Freeman was outstanding for the Aggies. The Wildcats 
handed one to Iowa State when they had an eight point lead 
with four minutes to go and lost to the Cyclones by a count 
of 25 to 24. The game was ragged throughout and the Aggies 
merely weakened in the final minutes to find themselves 
defeated when the game was over. Poor passing and inac- 
curate basket shooting by both teams caused the low score. 
Alex Nigro saved the day for the Aggies in the final game at 
Oklahoma when he went into the game with the Sooners 
one point ahead and figured in an 18 point rally, scoring nine 
points himself, for a 37 to 32 victory over the Sooners. Captain 
Clem Richardson was the high point scorer. Captain Tom 
Churchill of the Sooners again showed up well. 





Pago I'l 




Weybrew 


Skradsk 


I Dalton 




Colirse 


TlF.CHGRAEBER 


Morrison 


Teter 


Morgan 




Harsh 


Kennedy 


Steiger 


Going 





Freslimaii Basketball 



A FRESHMAN basketball squad which gave the varisty much competition throughout the season was 
coached this year by Owen "Chili" Cochrane, a former Aggie athlete. Starting early in the season with 
a large squad, the men were gradually eliminated, until only fifteen of the most outstanding freshman basketeers 
remained. The freshmen are not only trained in the rudiments of basketball, but furnish good opposition 
for the varisty in their practices. Much good material was found during the season and many m.en show 
promise of being outstanding varsity players in the years to come. 

Members of the squad to receive numerals were: H. L. Hasler, ElDorado; N. J. Weybrew, Wamego; 
A. Skradski, Kansas City, Kansas; L. H. Dalton, Fort Scott; D. P. Course, Abilene; W. Teichgraeber, Osage 
City; E. F. Morrison, Cobly; R. E. Teter, ElDorado; Lee Morgan, Hugoton; R. Smith, Manhattan; Glenn Harsh, 
El Dorado; E. R. Kennedy, Chase; H. A. Steiger, Menlo; and Jack Going, Topeka. 



Page 178 




timg 

10UEL R. PATTERSON, in three years as coach of the 
-''-^Kansas Aggies, has placed the Wildcats far up the list 
in wrestling circles. Patterson, himself a national inter- 
collegiate champion while attending school at the Okla- 
homa Aggies, has developed some outstanding wrestlers 
and is doing great work to develop wrestling in high 
schools throughout the state. He has sponsored an invi- 
tational meet here each year for high schools and this year 
was in charge of the state high school meet held here. The 
Aggie squad this season had a good year, finishing third 
in the individual Big Six meet held here, placing a man in 
every weight but the 165 pound class. Larger squads, 
making more competition for varsity positions, have led to 
stronger teams, and Coach Patterson's methods of handling 
his varsity men has led to better Kansas Aggie wrestling 
teams. C. H. McKibben, Kansas City, light-heavyweight 
wrestler, was captain this year, but because of injuries, was 
forced to quit early in the season. C. H. "Duke" Errington, 
Ruelton, third place winner in the heavyweight class in 
the National Intercollegiate and Big Six Champion 
for two years, will captain the Wildcat grapplers next 
season. With the loss of but two men and a large list]of candidates coming on, a good squad is expected next 
season. Lettermen this year were: K.J. Latimer, Humboldt; Ben Barber, Alton; Joe Fickel, Chanute; Sam Alsop, 
Wakefield; John Warner, Whiting; George Long, Burlington and C. H. Errington, Ruelton. 



R. Patterson 

Wrestling Coach 




I'ai ii-KMiN (coach), WAkNi-;K. Huvhi.K. bioNhKiNc;. AcvHRvian, C.\ 
Kimball. Tempero, Jackson, Thompson. RiiCNiER. Wbirick, nii 
Latimer, Patterson, Avery, Barber, Buckmaster, Randle. Smi 



Page 179 



Wrestling 




THE Aggies lost their first dual meet of the season to 
Missouri by a score of 223-2 to llH- Aggie winners in 
this meet were Warner, who defeated Garrison in the 155 
pound weight by a fall, and Errington, who defeated Black- 
lock in the heavyweight class by a fall. Fickel of the Aggies 
wrestled Moore of the Tigers to a draw in overtime periods 
of the 135 pound class. Barber of the Aggies threw himself 
in coming out of a hold in the 125 pound class. The Aggies 
won an easy victory over Kansas by a count of 23 to 9. Latimer 
won by decision in the 115 pound class, Fickel won by fall 
in the 135 pound class, Alsop won by fall in the 145 pound 
class, and Warner won by fall in the 155 pound class. 
Errington also won by fall in the heavyweight class. The 
three Aggie losses were by decisions and by narrow margins. 
Long of the Aggies, wrestling in place of Captain McKibben, 
gave Cochran a real battle but lost by decision. It was Sam 
Alsop's victory by fall that gave the Aggies a 14 to 12 victory 
over Nebraska as each squad took four matches. Latimer 
opened the evening with an overtime decision victory over 
Kosowki, but Webber of the Huskers evened the count with a 
decision over Barber. Fickel won a decision match from 
Reese and Alsop defeated Margaret by a fall in seven minutes. 
Simic won an overtime decision from Warner of the Aggies, 
and Chapman lost to Robertson in the 165 pound weight. 
Captain McKibben lost his light heavyweight match by 
decision to Hunt, but Errington won a decision from Keissel- 
bach. When Errington lost his only match of the year, the 
Aggies lost a match to Iowa State by a score of 15 to 9. In 
attempting to win by a fall, Errington was caught by a body 
scissor and was unable to come out to win from the Cyclone 
heavyweight. Latimer, Alsop and Long won their matches 
by decisions; none of the matches were won by falls in this 
meet. 



^^^^^m^^^^mmBi^^ 



m^^^^^^^m^^m 



Wresding 



THE Aggies had little luck against the Oklahoma Aggies, 
intercollegiate champions, and fell by a score of 25 to 3, 
with Kenneth Latimer the only Wildcat to win. Latimer won 
a close decision over Costner, and all the rest of the Aggies 
lost by decisions, except Long in the light heavyweight and 
Errington in the heavyweight. Both lost to men who were 
national champions, Long to Caldwell and Errington to 
McCready, who is also a Canadian champion and Olympic 
representative. In an all-decision affair with the University 
of Oklahoma, the Aggies came out with but three points, 
Errington getting a decision from Mackie. All the rest of 
the Aggies lost by decisions. Two national champions were 
on the Oklahoma team. The Big Six individual tournament 
was held at Manhattan, and the Aggie team placed two Big 
Six champions, and got third place in the meet, placing a man 
in every weight except the 165 pound class. Latimer placed 
second in the 115 pound class. Barber third in the 125 pound 
class, Fickel was champion in the 135 pound weight, Alsop 
was third in the 145 pound class, Warner was third in the 
155 pound class, Long tied for second in the 175 pound class, 
and Errington won the heavyweight title for the second con- 
secutive season. Errington and Fickel represented the Aggies 
in the National Intercollegiate at Penn State college and took 
sixth place in the meet for the school. Both were eliminated 
in the semi-finals, Errington by McCready, the champion. 
The two Aggies won preliminary matches by falls and 
Errington got a fall in wrestling for third place in the heavy- 
weight class, which he won. Only one letterman will be 
lost by graduation this year, Latimer in the 115 pound class. 
Captain McKibben, forced to quit wrestling because of his 
health, will finish school. A strong squad is expected next sea- 
son as there are a number of freshmen who were outstanding. 



.*^ 





Mhior Sports 



1 '1 1 1 

Bb ■ w mm m. ^Sa 




nPHE first on the winter intramural pro- 
gram was indoor track which was fol- 
lowed by the basketball free throwing 
contest, wrestling and swimming. Boxing 
was eliminated from the list of intramural 
events this season because of the objection 
of many that suitable matches could not 
be arranged due to the inability to rank 
the boxers as to class. The Aggie Knights 
won the indoor track and field meet with 
193/5 points. Sigma Nu was second with 
14, Phi Sigma Kappa third with 13, and 
Phi Kappa Tau fourth with 10. Only one 
record fell in the meet when Ward Philip, 
Sigma Nu, dashed the quarter mile to 
break the old mark. Philip was the high 
point man of the meet getting another 
hrst in the 220 yard race. Kennedy, Beta 
Theta Fi, tied the 35 yard dash record and 
Kenry, Aggie Knight, tied the pole vault 
record. Forsberg, Sigma Nu, won the bas- 
ketball free throw contest, tossing 58 
out of 75 attempts to beat Faulconer, 
Beta Theta Pi, who looped 55 of the 75- 
Walker, Sigma Nu, was third with 37 of 
50 attem.pts good. At the end of their 50 
shots, Forsberg and Faulconer were tied 
and an additional 25 shots were used in 
shooting the affair off. 



Page 182 



Nlinor Sports 



npEAM points m intramural wrestling 
■^ showed the Sigma Nu organization in 
the lead, although they did not rate a 
champion. They scored 95 points, while 
Lambda Chi Alpha was second with 93 
and Alpha Gamma Rho was third with 90. 
Independents played a large part in win- 
ning the championships, getting hve of the 
eight aw^arded. Winners of the various 
weights were: 115 pound class, P. W. 
Griffith, independent; 125 pound class, 
C. A. Schubert, independent; 135 pound 
class, F. L. Tempero, independent; 145 
pound class, J. Roberts, independent; 155 
pound class, R. Smith, Delta Tau Delta; 
165 pound class, L. Stoneking, Alpha 
Gamma Rho; 175 pound class, 11. Gump, 
Phi Sigma Kappa; and heavyweight class, 
T. Rostocil, independent. Beta Theta Pi 
won the swimming contest although hut 
two of their men were able to place. R. 
Spence, with firsts in the 40 yard free stvle 
and the fancy dive, and R. Rearwm with 
a first in the 220 yard free style and a 
second in the 100 yard free style, made a 
majority of the organization's points. The 
score was. Beta Theta Pi, 40; Phi Kappa 
Tau, 29; Delta Tau Delta and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, 26^9. The only record to fall in 
the meet was the 220 free style. Rearwm, 
Beta Theta Pi, paddled the distance in 
5:30.6 to beat the old mark of 3:32.4. 




Page ISS 



Minor Sports 




Lambertson Rhoades Buckmaster Rippey 



Swimming 



A YEAR ago swimming was revived as a minor sport at Kansas State, and although the Aggie swimmers 

failed to rank very high in individual events, relay teams proved to be point winners in the conference 

meet. Two dual meets were held by the Aggies this year, both with Nebraska. The Huskers were victorious, 

in the first by a 51 to 24 margin, and in the second by a score of 50 to 25. Coach C. S. Moll found it difficult 

to find swimmers who could nose out the strong Husker men. 

Buckmaster was the only Aggie to win a first in the first dual meet with the Huskers and he captured the 
40 and 100 yard free style events for ten of the 24 Aggie points. His time in the 100 yard race tied the Big Six- 
record. Others who placed in the meet were: Schlotterbeck, a second in the fancy dive and breast stroke 
events; Rhoades, a third in the dive; Rippey, a third in the 440 yard free style; and Lambertson, a third in the 
150 yard backstroke. Livingston also took third in the 40 yard event. 

The only first against Nebraska in the second meet was won by Buckmaster, who took the 100 yard free 
style. Hanson took a second in the 440 yard free style, and Lambertson a second in the 150 vard back stroke. 
In the dive event, Buckmaster was second and Rhoades was third. Rhoades also got third in the 440 yard 
free style and Buckmaster won third in the 40 yard event. Fockele was third in the breast stroke. At the 
conference meet, the Aggies finished fourth. Nebraska won the meet, Iowa State was second, and Kansas was 
third. The Aggies placed third in the two relay events for the only places. All but one of the conference 
records fell at the meet, which was the fastest of the year. 

Swimming lettermen were: A. D. Buckmaster, Manhattan; C. M. Rhoades, Newton; Gene Livingston, 
Hutchinson; Max Fockele, Ottawa; A. Lambertson, Fairview; and D. E. West, Hartford. 



Page 18i 



Sown ties 



Senior Women's Panhellenic 



OFFICERS 



Dorothy Wagner 
Helen Hughes 
lucile correll - 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Norma Koons 

Alpha Theta Chi 
Inez Hill 
Vera Peterson 

Alpha Xi Delta 
JuANiTA Walker 

Beta Phi Alpha 
Edna Pieplow 
LiLLiE Olson 



Hilah Crocker 

Delta Delta Delta 
LuciLE Correll 
Lois Anderson 

Delta Zeta 

Margaret Colver 



Kappa Delta 

Vera Bowersox 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 



M/ 



rgaret uarden 



Phi Omega Pi 
Jenny Long 

Pi Beta Phi 

Helen Hughes 



Koons 
Peterson 
Walker 
Olson 



Pieplow 
Crocker 
Correll 
Colver 



Wagner 
Bowersox 
Darden 



Long 
Hughes 




Pago 1S5 



Sororities 




Barrett 
Smiley 
Cousins 
Johnson 



David 
Roper 

PlERSON 

Parks 



Burson 

Nelson 
Fones 



Freshmen Women's Panhellenic 



Sybil Parks - 
Maxine Roper 
LoRAiNE Barrett 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Frances Jones 
Margaret Elder 

Alpha Xi Delta 
LoRAiNE Barrett 
Esther Smiley 

Beta Phi Alpha 
Bernice Cousins 
Myrtle Johnson 



Chi Omega 

Frances Ellsworth 
Dorothy Peery 

Delta Zeta 
Helen Lichty 
Dorothy Canham 

Delta Delta Delta 
Maxine Roper 
Georgia David 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Sybil Parks 
Helen Swan 



Kappa Delta 

Margaret Pierson 
Doris Shaver 

Pt Beta Phi 
Maxine Fones 
Kathryn Gillihan 

Phi Omega Pi 
Vada Burson 
Rudy Nelson 






Page ISG 



Sororities 



Sorority Housemothers 



Alpha Delta Pi 


Delta Zeta 


Mrs. Ransom Stephens 


Mrs. J. W. Vaniman 


Alpha Theta Chi 

Mrs. Harriet K. Everly 


Kappa Delta 

Mrs. R. W. West 


Alpha Xi Delta 




Mrs. E. S. Chambers 


Kappa Kappa Ganitna 




Mrs. Mary M. Goodwin 


Beta Phi Alpha 




Mrs. Lillian Wullenwaber 






Phi Omega Pi 


Cht Omega 


Mrs. Gertrude Torry 


Mrs. James Barry 




Delta Delta Delta 


Pi Beta Phi 


Mrs. Henry R. Pehling 


Mrs. Elizabeth Warner 



Mrs. Stevens 
Mrs. Everly 
Mrs. Chambers 
Mrs. Wullenwai 



Mrs. Barry 
Mrs. Pehling 
Mrs. Vaniman 
Mrs. West 



Mrs. Goodwin 
Mrs. Torry 
Mrs. Warner 




Page 1S7 



Sororities 



Annan 
Ansdell 
Bacon 
Booker 

BOULT 



Castleman 
Daigh 

Dickinson 
Doyle 
Elder 



GlBBS 

Hahn 
Hanes 
Hakl 

Halstead, C. 



Halstead, L. 
Johnson 
Jones, F. 
Jones, M. 

KOONS 



Lacey 
Large 

McCammon 
Madsen 
Nickels 



Nolan 
Peterson 
Rhea 
Rhodes 

Ross, Flora 



Ross, Frances 
Shuck 
Skillin 
Smith 



Thackrey 
Wilson, C. 
Wilson, K. 












Page ISS 



Sororities 




Alpha Delta Pi 

Founded at Wesleyan Female College, Macon, Georgia, May, 1851 
Alpha Eta chapter established October 30, 1915 




Flower — Violet 



Colors — Blue and White 



MEMBERS 



Anna Annan '30, Beloit 
JOYE Ansdell '32, Jamestown 
Margaret Bacon '33, Manhattan 
Cjrale Booker '31, Clay Center 
Patricia Boult '33, Manhattan 
Mildred Castleman '32, Junction City 
Faigii Daioh '32, Ashland 
Donna Dickinson '30, Rock 
Melba Doyle '33, Eskridge 
Margaret Elder '31, Hutchinson 
Leah Gidds '32, Spearville 
Hklene Hahn '32, Clav Center 



Alice Hakl '33, Stanton, Nebr. 
Catherine Halstead '30, Manhattan 
Helen Halstead '32, Manliattan 
ViRoiLiNE Hanes '31, Augusta 
Kathyrn Johnson '33, Abilene 
Frances Jones '32, Kansas City 
Mildred Jones '31, Clay Center 
Norma Koons '31, Sharon Springs 
Vaughn Lacey '32, Sharon Springs 
TiiELMA Large '31, Protection 
Alene McCammon '31, Ked Cloud, Nc 
Louise Madsen '32, Naforna 
Vivien Nhkels '32, Manhattan 



Peggy Nolan '32, Earned 
N'irginia Peterson '33, Manhattan 
Alice Rhea '31, Earned 
Mildred Jo Rhodes '31, Tampa 
Flora Ross '30, Ainarilla, Texas 
Frances Ross '33, Amarilla, Texas 
JuANirA Shuck '30, Kansas Cit\ . NU 
MiNA Skili.in '31, Frankfort 
Maurine Smith '33, Hutchinson 
N'lRA TnuKERY '31, Grceiishurg 
( I Mil W 11 SON '31, Onaga 
Kmuicn Wh^on '30, Liberiv. Mo. 



Sororities 



Anderson 

BlERMAN 

Bland, H. 
Bland, O. 



Brill 

Briscoe, C. 
Briscoe, F. 
Britt 



Doty 
Gould 
Hill 
Johnson 



)ONES 

Lynch 

Maxwell, E. 
Maxwell, F. 



OURSLER 

Parcels 
Peterson 
Rand 



Roberts 
schrumpf 
Seyb 



Smith 

SlOVI.R 

TuiBi. 




Page 



Sororities 




Theta Chi 



Founded at K. S. A. C. in May, 1924 
Flower — Shasta Daisy Colors — Gold and Blue 




Virginia Anderson '30, Lincoln 
MARciARET l3iERMAN '33, Kcnsin^tOH 
Hazel Bland '33, Garden City 
Olive Bland '30, Garden City 
Gertrude Brill '30, Westmoreland 
Carol Briscoe '32, Cambridge 
Faith Briscoe '31, Cambridge 
Louie Britt '31, Manchester 
Dorothea Dorv '32, Cunningliam 



Esther Gould '31, Manhattan 
Inez Hill '32, Topeka 
Florence Hull '30, Portis 
WiLMA Jenninc'.s '30, Little River 
WiNii'RED Johnson '32, Franktort 
Anna Jones '32, Frankfort 
Margaret Lynch '33, Hutchinson 
Edna Maxwell '32, Manhattan 
Frances Maxwell '30, Manhattan 

RODERTA OuRSI.ER '32, CirdcX lllc 



Helen Parcels '30, Hi.iu.irlia 
Vera Peterson '^I, Ci\pMiin 
Elsie Rand '30, Wamego 
Thelma Roberts '30 Manhattan 
Dorothy Schrumim- '30, Cotton\\0( 
Gertrude Seyh '31, Pretty Prairie 
Martha SMirn '30, Durham 
Rudy Stover '31, Kansas Citv 
Alice Trimmii: '31. Cudeville 



Sororities 



Barrett 
Burt 

Brubaker 
Chatterton 
Claeren 



Crabbe 
Davidson 
De Witt 

Fullinwider 
Glunt 



Greep 
Harding 
Hedge 
Ives 

JULIEN 



Kimball 
Lyles 

McClelland, A. 
McClelland, V. 

McKlNNEY, M. 



McKinney, p. 
Mark 

Merryman 
Moore 
O'Connor 



Pacey 

Schmedemann 
Schmidler 
Shellhaas 
Smiley 



Stevens 

Stiles, Rowena 
Stiles, Ruth 
Teter 



Walker 
Wells 
Wentz 

Williamson 






.151 










*5 




Page 192 



Sororities 




Xi Delta 



Founded at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, April 17, 1893 
Alpha Kappa chapter established June 1, 1922 



iiiTMMl*iiwiirii 



Flower — Pink Rose 



Colors — Doi/hle Blue ai/J Gold 



MEMBERS 



LoRAiNE Barrett '32, Topeka 
Neva Burt '31, Greensburg 
Barbara Brubakek '32, Manhattan 
Charlotte Chatterton '33, Admire 
Ruth Claeren '30, Manhattan 
Mary Ellen Crabbe '32, Manliattan 
Bernice Davidson '31, Manhattan 
Ruth De Witt '32, Medicine Lodge 
Katherine Fullinwider '31, EIDoradi 
Helen Glunt '32, Garrison 
Margaret Greep '30, Longford 
Katharine Harding '30, Manhattan 
IvALEE Hedge '32, Manhattan 



LoRiETA Ives '33, Mount Hope 
Mildred JuLiEN '32, Wamego 
Pattie Kimball '31, Manhattan 
Marjorie Lyles '32, Sairord\ilie 
Alice McClelland '31, Topeka 
Vernita McClelland '32, Topeka 
Margaret McKinney '30, Great Bei 
Pearl McKinney '31, junction Cit\ 
Merle Mark '32, Abilene 
Josephine Merryman '33, Topeka 
Johnnie Moore '32, Minneola 
Gretchen O'Connor '31 , St. John 
Leone Pacey '30, Manhattan 



Gladys Schmedemann '30, Manhattan 
Lorna Schmidler '30, Marvsville 
Genevieve Shellhaas '33, junction Citv 
Esther Smiley '33, Manliattan 
Dorothy Stevens '32, Medicine Lodijc 
Rowena Stiles '33, Kansas Cit\ 
Ruth Stiles '33, Kansas Cit\ 
CleoTeter '30, Eli:)orado 
Alta Thierer '33, Manliattan 
JUANITA Walker '31. Vallev Falls 
Ila Hall Wells, Spec, Manhattan 
Frances Wentz '30, Ames 
Lois Wui.ivMsoN '32, Manhattan 



Page 193 



Sororities 



Amthauer 
Campbell 
Cousins 
Decker 
Graham 



Greene 
Holland 
HusE 
Johnson, L. 

Johnson, M. 



Kaine 
Larson 
Masden 
Nicholson 
Obrecht 



Olson 

Palmquist 
Pieplow 
Pishney 
Posey 



Pretz 

ROCKEY 

Rude 
Rush 

Rust, H. 



Rust, I. 
Sayre 
Schafer 

Sherman 



Smerchek 
Trechsel 
West 






\ k 



I-'// ^4.1 









Sororities 




Founded at University of California, Berkely, California, 1909 
Nu Chapter established October 23, 1926 




Flower — Yellow Ted Rose 



Colors — Green and Gold 



Mabel Amthauer '32, Dwight 
Marcine Campbell '33, Hollis 
Bernice Cousins '31, Manhattan 
Marian Cross '32, Manhattan 
Irene Decker '30, Robinson 
Ethel Ederhart '32, Topcka 
Ruth Graham '31, Manliattan 
Marian Greene '32, Lincoln 
Anita Holland '30, Harper 
La Verne Huse '32, Manhattan 
Leora Johnson '33, Brookvillc 



Myrtle Johnson '33, Concordia 
Isadelle Kaine '33, Wamego 
Frances Larson '32, Sniolan 
Mildred Masden '32, Lcnora 
Bonnidelle Nicholson '32, Olathc 
Dorothy Ohrecht '31, Topcka 
LiLLiE Olson '32, Manhattan 
Lucille Palmquist '33, Concordia 
Edna Pieplow '31, Hutchinson 
Mila Pisiiney '33, Clchurnc 
Luc ii.E Posey '32, Larncd 
Nellie Pretz '32, Irving 



Esther Rockey '31, Manhattan 
Dorothy Rude '32, Great Bend 
Neva Ruth '30, Severv 
Helen Rust '30, Manhattan 
IvA Mae Rust '31, Junction City 
Mary Sayre '32, NIanliattan 
Mary Ellen Schaker '32, Manhattan 
Nina Sherman '33, Griiincli 
Elizabeth Smerchek '32, Cleburne 
Nellie Trechsel '30, Idana 
Elsie Mae West '32, Manliattan 



Sororities 



Arbuthnot 
Bacon 

BiCKEL 

Blankenship 

BOWLUS 



Casey 

Crocker, H. 
Crocker, M. 
Ellsworth 
Fisher 



Fockele 
Fox 

Havley 
Hill 

HuLPIEU 



Johnston 

Laughead 
Manshardt 
Miller 
Mills 



Nelson 

O'Donovan 
Peery 

ROONEY 

Schorer 



Scott 
Smalley 
Wright 
Young 




Page 196 



Sororities 




CM Omeofa 



Chi Omega was founded at Fayetteville, Arkansas, 1895 
Kappa Alpha chapter established 1915 



Flower — White Carnation 



Colors Card; na/ and Straw 



Marie Arduthni)!- '30, Bennington 
Winifred Bickel '32, Kansas City, Mo. 
Clementine Bacon '31, EIDorado 
Maxine Blankenship '33, Downs 
Louise Bowlus '31, Russell 
Fairy Casey '33, Glasco 
Hilah Crocker '31, Manhattan 
Marian Crocker '32, Manhattan 
Frances Ellsworth '33, Formoso 
Willa Fisher '33, Bennington 



Frances Fockele '33, Le Roy 
Mildred Fox '30, Wichita 
Lillian Havley '31, Manhattan 
Ruth Hill '31, Guthrie, Okla. 
Kathleen Hulpieu '30, Dodge Cit\' 
Hazel Johnston '30, Leonardville 
Eleanor Lauc.head '30, Dodge Cit\' 
MAiqoKiii Mansmardt '30, Lconard\ ilk- 
Ruth Miiikr '31, Paico 



WiLMA Mills '32, Franktort 
Isahelle Nelson '33, Delplios 
Ruth O' Donovan '30, Topck.i 
Dorothy Peery '32, EIDorado 
Mae Rooney '30, Haddani 
Maxine ScHORER '30, CIvde 
Elizabeth Scott '32, Manliattan 
Eva Mae Sm alley '32, Kansas Citv 
Eleanor Wright '33, Concordia 
Josephine Young '32, Junction CitN 



Sororities 



Anderson 

Bowman 

Bragg 

CORRELL 

David 



Dodge 

DODSON 

Gaston 
Hadsell 

HOTZ 



Irwin 
Jack, F. 
Jack, R. 
Keef 
Krauss 



LOOMIS 

Morgan 
OsBORN, Ida 
Osborn, M. 

PURCELL 



Read 
Remick 

RiORDAN 

Rogers 

ROGGE 



Roper 

Samuel 
Shenkel 
Skinner 
Sloan 



Stanley 
Stout 

Van Meter 
Wall 
Wapler 




Pai/e lU 



Sororities 




Delta Delta Delta 

Founded at Boston University, 1888 
Theta Iota chapter established June 5, 1915 



Flower — Pansy 



Colors — Silver, Gold, and Blue 




MEMBERS 



Lois Anderson '31, Byers 
Georoena Bowman '31, Garnett 
Margaret Bragg '32, Dodge City 
Marietta Cleland '33, Whiting 
LuciLE Correll '32, Manhattan 
Georgia David '31, Bartlesviile, Okhi 
Helen Laura Dodge '31, Manliattan 
Iris Dodson '32, Silt, Colo. 
Fern Gaston '33, 'Wakefield 
DoROTiiA Hadsell '33, Manhattan 
Ver Lee Hotz '32, Dodge City 
Alice Irwin '31, Manhattan 
Frances Jack '33, Russell 



Roberta Jack '33, Russell 
Josephine Keep '30, Glen Elder 
Louise Krauss '33, Topeka 
Edith Loom is '31, Osborne 
Olive Morgan '31, Manhattan 
Ida OsiiORN '31, Clifton 
Mildred Oshorn '30, Clifton 
Mildred Purcell '31, Manhattan 
Mary Bell Read '30, Manhattan 
Charlotte Remick '32, Manhattan 
Marion Riordan '33, Solomon 
Grayce Rogers '32, Stockton 
Faye RoGcn; '31, Muscotah 



Maxine Roper '33, Manhattan 
Pauline Samuel '31, Manhattan 
Estella Shenkel '31, Geneseo 
Jane Skinner '33, Stockton 
Helen Sloan '31, Hutchinson 
Maxine Stanley '33, Concordia 
Cora Stout '33, Russell 
Katherine Taylor '31, Chapman 
Ruth Thomas '32, Baxter Springs 
C.,1: \ \'vN Mi-Ti'R 'y. Ada 
I'lsii. WMi Vi, C.uNkcr Cx\.\ 
Douis W APLi-K y, Wakefield 



Pa tic lao 



Sororities 



Canham 
Chronister 
Clark 

COLVER 



Davis 

Fisher 
Greene 

Grosshardt 



KiRKWOOD 

Latzke 

LiCHTY 

Lodge 



LONGREN 

McChesney 
Rankin 

RONEY 



schreiner 
Shields 
Stafford 



Wagner 

Widestrand 




Sororities 




)elta Zeta 



Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, October 24, 1902 
Lambda chapter established May 22, 1915 



Flower — Killarney Rose 



Colors — Rose cuul Nile Grcai 




MEMBERS 



Blanche Blair '33, Manhattan 
Dorothy Canham '33, Kansas City, Mo. 
Mary K. Chronister '31, Topeka 
Jo Clark '31, Leavenworth 
Margaret CoLVER '31, Manhattan 
Saloma Davis '30, Carthage, Mo. 
Clella Fisher '31, Fellsbur^ 



Ruth Greene '33, Beverl\ 
Rose Grosshardt '33, Clallin 
Lucia Kirkwood '33, Lcaxcii 
■Verna Latzke '30, Chapman 
Helen Lichty '31, Sabetha 
Nina Lodoe '32, Wellington 
Evelyn Lonculn '31, Lconai 
Ruth MeCnKSNi.v '32, Str.utc 



Jvill 
n, Ci 



Mary Rankin '30, Kansas Cit\- 
Hazel Roney '33, Hutchinson 
Leah Schreiner '30, Ramona 
Leota Shields '31, Ramona I 
Marjorie Stafford '31, Leonard\ 
Dorothy Wagner '30, Topeka 
Ri'TH WioKSTuvNo ■31.Topcka 



Sororities 



bowersox 
Darrah 

DOWD 

Edelblute 
Haas 



Harland 

Haughawout 

HlXSON 

Hull, A. 
Hull, E. 



Linn 

LUNBECK 

McNally 
Marteney 
Nachtrieb 



Norton 
Pendleton 

PlERSON 

Ramey, E. 
Ramey, M. 



Rucker 
Scheu 
Shaver 
Simpson 
Smith 



Stewart 
Stin(}ley 
Van Hook: 

Walker, Vera 
Walker, Vesta 




Page 202 



Sororities 




It 



eita 



Founded at Virginia State Normal, 1897 
Sigma Gamma chapter established December 4, 1920 



Flower — White Re 



Colors — Green and White 



Vera Bowiiusox '32, Great ]k-nd 
Thelma Carver '32, Chanute 
Nellie Darrah '31, McPherson 
Gladys Dowd '32, Wicliita 
Virginia Edelblute '32, Mar]lia 
Alice Linn '31, Clyde 
Reland Lunbeck '30, Maiiliattai 
Sue Haas '33, Arringtoii 
May Harland '31, Fraiikloit 
Ruth H auoiiawaut '33, ()na,t;a 
HvA HixsoN '30, Wakeenev 



Aileen Hull '30, Manhattan 
Electa Hull '32, Manhattan 
Madge Marteney '31, Haven 
Ruth McNally '33, Olathe 
Winifred Nachtrieb '30, Atchison 
Ella Naylor '33, Ciminaron 
Harriette Norton '33, Cinuiiaron 
Margaret- Pierson '33, Wakeenev 
Fern Pendleton '33, Rossville 
Edith Rsmev '33, Manhattan 
Marjoril Rsmey '33, Manhaitan 



Edna Runciman '33, Cul\er 
Dorothy Rucker '30, Manhattan 
Louise Scheu '32, Cla\' Center 
Doris Shaver '33, Cedarvale 
Dorothy Simpson '31, Colo. Sprint: 
Ruth Smith '31, Wintield 
Eldana Stewart '32, Eskridjje 
Lois Stingley '33, Manhattan 
Virginia Van Hook '30, Topeka 
Vi-RA Wslki:r '31, Wakeenev 
\ rsi \ Wmkir '^1, Wakeenev 



Sororities 



Bell 



Gates 

GiLSON, E. 
GiLSON, H. 

Harner 
James, F. 



James, H. 
Leighton 

LiNGE 

McCoRMICK 



McGeorge 



Parks 

RiCKENBACKER 

Sellors 
Sheetz 
Shuyler 



Skinner 
Strong 
Swan 

Teichgraeber 



Verser 
Weddle 

Woodworth 





Cortelyou 

Curtis t . ' ^^ 

Darden 



Downing 
duckwall 
Durham 
Emrich 

Freeman 







^2a 











■A^ }h. I 








m 

V 1 1 " 



V 



E-:- 



Sororities 




appa 



Gamma 



Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, 

October 13, 1870 

Gamma Alpha chapter established September 23, 1916 

Flower — Fleur-de-Us Colors — Light and Dark Blue 




MEMBERS 



Frances Bell '33, Marysvillc 
Margaret Chaney '32, Manhattan 
M ARY Jo CoRTELYou '32, Manhattan 
Frances Curtis '30, Kansas City, Mo. 
Margaret Darden '31, Manhattan 
Emily Downing '31,OklaliomaCity, Okhi. 
Donna Gayle Duckwall '30, Abilenc 
Helen Durham '32, Manhattan 
Ruth Emrich '31, Tyronza, Ark. 
Sidney Freeman '32, Manhattan 
Helen Gates '31, lola 



Eolia Gilson '31, Manhattan 
Harriet Gilson '33, Manhattan 
Claue Harner '31, Howard 
Florence James '31, New Hni^laiiJ, N. O. 
Hazle James '33, New En^Mand, N, Vi. 
Eugenia Leighton '31, West Helena, .\rk 
Dt)iu)THY Linge '33, Topcka 
Eoretta McCormick '30, Plainsvillc 
Elizabeth McGeoiu.i '31, Wcllinuron 
Syiui, Parks '32, Parsons 



|i:an Rii. kenbacker '32, Turlock, Cai. 
Lydia Sei.lors '32, Fort Worth, Texas 
Cjertrude Sheetz '30, Admire 
Helen Marie Shuyler '30, Hutchinson 
Josephine Skinner '32, Topeka 
Ji'sNiTA Strong '33, Kansas City, Mo. 
HiiEN Louise Swan '33, Topeka 
Helen Teichoraeber '32, Marquette 
1 1 \nette Verser '30, Oklahoma Cit\ , C^k 1. 
R \mona Weddle '32, Lindsbort; 
Ukatrue WoonwoRTH '31, Corniiit; 



Sororities 



Beaty 
Bowi 



Brunson 

BURSON 



Child 

CONARD 

Cook 



Curry 



Ferguson 
Foley 
Gordon 



Hahn 

HiLYARD 

Jelinek 
Long 



McCammon 

McMoRAN 

Morse 
Morton 



Nelson, L. 
Nelson, R. 
O'Neill 
Riley 



SlIliWMAKER 
SoURK 

Van Pelt 







m 



& M 



\%^^ 




Page 206 



Sororitie, 




Founded University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, March 5, 1910 
Omicron chapter established May 31, 1910 

Flower — Yellow and White Chrysanthewtiw Colors — Gold and White 




MEMBERS 



Etnaii Beaty '30, Lakin 
Mildred Bower '33, Norton 
AiLEEN Brunson '32, IDcllvalc 
Vada Burson '31, Manhatta/i 
Louise Child '30, Manhattan 
Frances Conard '30, Ottawa 
Naomi Cook '31, Linn 
Blanche Curry '32, Winchester 
Marjorie Dean '32, Manliattan 
JEAN Ferguson '31, Manhattan 



Geraldine Foley '30, Oionoqiie 
Ruth Gordon '30, DcSoto 
Velma Hahn '31, Idana 
LoRA Hilyard '30, Manhattan 
Josephine FiSK Jelinek '30, ManI 
Genevieve Long '30, Ha\ ilanj 
Ruth McCammon '30, Norton 
Blanche McMou an '32, Coldwai 
Dorothea Mors..; '33, W'ulnia 



Clarine Morton '33, ColJwatcr 
Lucille Nelson '33, JanKstown 
Ruby Nelson '31 , Jamestown 
LuELLA O'Neill '30, Winchester 
MiNA Paddack '33, Lakin 
Wanda Riley '30, Chanute 
Frances Shewm vker '30, Clianute 
Lela Sourk '32, Goli 
Helen \'an \\a x '31, Hdoii 
Olive \' \n Pi li M, Bcloit 



Sororities 



Allen 
Amos 

bockenstette 
Bradley 
Carney 



Chaffin 
Clammer 

COWDERY 

culbertson 
Featherston 



FONES 

Forrester 
Gillihan 
Greer 
Harris 



Hart 

Helstrom 

HOLTON 

hotchkiss 
Hughes 



Kingsbury 
Lytle 

McClaren 

McNiCKLE 

Mangelsdorf 



(^ 



WiW^. 









Randall 
Rankin 
Schooler 
Simpson 



Smith, Mildred 
Smith, Vera 
Sparr 

Stevenson 

Strickland, I. 

Strickland, Ruth 
Washington 
White 

WOMER 

Wu ESTER 







Sororities 




Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, April 28, 1867 
Kansas Beta chapter estalished 1915 



Flower — Wine Carnation 



Coi 



Wine and Silver Blue 



Ruth Allen '32, Parsons 
Juliana Amos '33, Manhattan 
Edith Bockenstette '33, Sabetha 
Marjorie Bradley '33, Topeka 
Mary Carney '32, Manhattan 
Marguerite Chaffin '31, Caldwell 
Katherine Chappell '30, Manhattan 
Miriam Clammer '31, Manhattan 
Gertrude Cowdery '33, Lyons 
Helen CuLnERTSON '31, Kansas City, Mo. 
Violet Featherston '32, Manhattan 
Virginia Fielding '31, Manhattan 
Virginia Forrester '31, Manhattan 
Maxink Fones '33, Kansas City, Mo. 



MEMBERS 

Kathryn Gillihan '31 , Gallatin, Mo. 
Freda Greer '31, Marion 
Faye Harris '30, Parsons 
Laura Hart '30, Overbrook 
Ruth Helstrom '31, McPherson 
Mary Holton '33, Manhattan 
Helena Hotchkiss '32, Concordia 
Helen Hughes '32, Maniiattan 
Mildred Kingsbury '32, Herington ■ 
Joan Lytle '31, McPherson 
Agnes McClaren '32, Galena 
Georgia McNkkle '32, Ashland 
DoKoiiiY Malthy '33, Canton 
Helen MANiiHi.snoRi' '32, .\fchison 
Virginia Pakkhr '33, LI Paso, Texas 



Helen Randall '31, Ashhind 
Margaret Rankin '30, Wakeheld 
D. May Schooler '32, Kansas City, Mo. 
Frances Simpson '31, McPherson 
Mildred Smith '32, Augusta 
Vera Smith '33, Topeka 
Jane Sparr '32, Ellsworth 
Marjorie Stevenson '33, Oberlin 
loNE Strickland '32, Manhattan 
Ruth Strickland '33, Manhattan 
Mary Washington '30, NLmh.irtaii 
Marcia Jane White '32, Kansas Cu\ , NU 
Eleanor Womer '32, Agra 

Gl-KTIU-OK WUKSTI-R '33^ BcattK 




^t/ -^ &. .. 



p^^a 



Mrs. Rhoades 
Wentz 
eskeldson 



PORIER 

LORTCHER 
HORNE 






schweiter 
James 
Brening 



Van Zile Hall 



First Sefnester 




Second Semester 


Frances Wentz 


President - 


Myrtle Horne 


Katrina Eskeldson 


- Vice-President 


- HiLDRED ScHWEITER 


Opal Mae Porter - 


Secretary - 


Florence James 


Loraine Lortscmer 


- Treasurer 


- Justina Brening 



Mrs. Nina M. Rhoades Housemother 

\'an Zile Hall is rhe residence for college women on the 
campus. It has accommodations for 129 women. The hall 
is named ior Mrs. Mary P. \'an Zile, who was inlluential in 
secui-in^' the building for K. S. A. C, and who did much to 
make it an ideal home for college women. 




Pape SIO 



Literary Societies 



Inter=Society Council 



First Semester 
William Sweet 
Pauline Samuel 
Ruth Graham - 
Laurel Owsley 



OFFICERS 

President - 
Vice-President 
Secretary - 
Treasurer 



Second Semester 
Laurel Owsley 
Eugene Collins 
Mary McCroskey 
Dale Jones 



MEMBERS 



Alpha Beta 

Elmer Randle 
Anna Briggs 
Everett L. Ross 

Athenian 

Eugene Collins 
William Sweet 

Browning 

Leone Pacey 
Mary McCroskey 

Eurodelphian 

Bernice Bender 
Ruth Graham 
Eileen Roberts 
Lesta Lawrence 



Franklin 

Laurel Owsley 
Marshall McCulloh 

Hamilton 
Paul Mears 
Dale Jones 
Ralph Melville 

Ionian 

Annie Kerr 
Pauline Samuel 
Frances Maxwell 

Webster 

Ross Anderson 
Arnold Chase 
Robert Russell 



Sponsor — Miss Grace Derby 



Anderson 
Bender 
Chase 
Graham 



Jones 
Kerr 

McCulloh 
Mears 



Pacey 
Randall 
Ross 

Sweet 




Page 211 




Inter°Societv Council 



nPHE Inter-Society Council was organized in order that the 
members of the several literary societies on the campus 
might be brought into a closer relationship with each other, 
with a mutual benefit resulting for all concerned. The prin- 
cipal activities of the Council are supervising contests of 
several kinds between the societies and stimulating interest 
in these contests. 

The first contest to be held during the year on the Inter- 
Society program was that of Inter-Society debate. The 
societies this year were all represented by able teams, and the 
Arnold E. Chase debates that were held were interesting and well planned. 

None of the debaters had ever participated in varsity debate 
or oratory. When the contest was finally finished, it was found that all of the organizations had lost at least 
one debate with the exception of the Webster society, which had been victorious in every case. The Webster 
team was composed oi Arnt)ld Chase and Louis Kovar. A silver loving cup was the prize for winning this 
contest. 

Immediately after Christmas the Inter-Society activities were again revived, and the oratorical contest was 
held. Only six of the societies participated in this contest, two of the girl's organizations failing to make entries 
in the competition. Arnold E. Chase, Webster, was given first place by the judges. Second place was won by 
Rachel Lamprecht of the Ionian society, and Dan McLachlan won third place for the Athenian Literary Society. 
Other participants in the oratorical were Joe Fickel, representing Hamilton, N. O. Butler, Alpha Beta, and 
Mona Stoops, of the Franklin society. 

The last of the program of the Inter-Society Council was the one act play contest, in which two societies 
joined forces and presented their dramatic ability. This contest has only been a part of the Inter-Society program 
for the past three years. Each year the plays presented have shown a greater degree of dramatic art, and have 
constantly improved in the matter of directing and staging. First place in the play contest was won by the 
Hamilton-Ionian ccMiihination, and second place among the five plays given was won by Browning-Athenian. 

Since there are so few contests in which the societies may take part, no attempt is made to determine the 
final standings for the whole year. If final standings were made, however, certainly the Webster Literary Society 
would head the list. This society took first in the oratory and debate contests, and made a creditable showing 
in the one act phiy competition. 

The Inter-Society Council is well satisfied with the interest taken in the past year, and in the quality of 
the work offered in the several contests. 



Page 212 



^^^^i^im^-^m^^^i 



Literary Societies 



a 



First Semester 
Laura Marcy 
Elmer Randle 
Kenneth Dunnington 
William Chalmers 
NoRVAL Butler 
Arthur Owens 



Frances Amstutz 
Harry Axtell 
Clarence Barber 
Robert Berkey 
John Blasdel 
Anna Briggs 
Dorothy Burnet 
A. N. Burns 
Lester Burton 
N. O. Butler 
Wm. Chalmers 



OFFICERS 

Second Semester 

President - - Lester Burton 

Vice-President Corabelle Tolin 

Secretary -------- Helen Joseph 

Treasurer --------- Everett Ross 

Marshall -------- Otho Koontz 

Assistant Marshall ------ Kenneth Cornell 

MEMBERS 

Kenneth Cornell Lawrence Kurtz 

A. H. Dawson Laura Marcy 

Kenneth Dunnington Laurence Miles 

Kenneth Gapen Arthur Owens 

Nona Goff Elmer Randle 

G. A. Graham Everett Ross 

Mable Hall Steven Roehrman 

Keith Hinchsliff Corabelle Tolin 

W. H. Jobling Harold Totten 

Verneal Johnson Mary Wilson 

Helen Joseph Homer Yoder 
Otho Koontz 

N. O. Butler, Orator 



Axtell 
Burnet 
Burton 
Butler 



Dawson 
Jobling 
Johnson 
Koontz 



Kurtz 
Randle 
Ross 




Literary Societies 




Selby, Appi., Creep, Freeman, Morgan, O'Hara, Winters. Graham 
Vanderpool, Taylor, Coliins, Sweet, Stenzel, Miller, Combs 

SwENSON, Jordan, McLachlan, North, McIntire, Freeman. Quiglry, Edinborough 
Martin, Naylor, Newman, Halbert, Gingrich, Yardley, Coyle 



Athenian Literary Societv 



OFFICERS 



First Semester 

W. J. Sweet 
J. E. Taylor 
R. B. Mather - 
R. N. Selby - 
Charles Morgan 



Second Semester 



President ------ J.E.Taylor 

Vice-President ----- Ralph Freeman 

Secretary - - - - - - R.N. Selby 

Treasurer - - - - - - M.E. Miller 

Corresponding Secretary - - - E. F. Collins 



MEMBERS 



T. a. Appl 

F. S. Coyle 

E. F. Collins 

G. V. Combs 

H. C. Edinborough 

F. R. Freeman ' 
Ralph Freeman 
Spencer' Graham 
T. R. Gingrich 
R. O. Greep 

D. F. Halbert 
C. E. Harnes 
O. I. Haury 
A. S. McIntire 
Dan McLachlan 
Ray Mannen 
F. S. Martin 
R. B. Mather ~^ 
M. E. Miller 
C. E. Morgan 



C. W. Naylor 
Clyde Newman 
G. C. Nonken 

E. C. North 
Sidney North 
R. W. O'Hara 

G. L. QuiGLEY ■ 

R. E. Roderick 
M. R. Salmon 
R. N. Seldy 
I. R. Stenzel 
W.J. Sweet; 
Roland Swenson 
J. E. Taylor 
G. R. Vanderpool 
Otis E. Wiley 
Jordan Willis 

F. G. Winters 
Clifford Yardley 



mmmm^mmms^^^^m^ 



m; 



Page 21 J, 



F irst Semester 

Helen Steuart . . . - 

Fern Maxey ----- 
Dorothy Dexter - - - - 
Ruby Stover ----- 

LUELLA VaNDERPOOL 

Orpha Brown - - - - 

Mabel Amthauer 
Mildred Baker 
Mary Barkley 
Fern Barr 
Olive Bland 
Orpha Brown 
Rita Brown 
Beatrix Charlton 
Helen Cook 
Genevieve Crowley 
Blanche Curry 
Ruth De Witt 
Dorothy Dexter 
Leda Dunton 



Literary S octet it 

Literary 

OFFICERS 

Second Semester 

President -------- Orpha Brown 

Vice-President ------- Olive Bland 

Recording Secretary ...... Genevieve Crowley 

Corresponding Secretary ----- Dorothy Raburn 

Treasurer -------- Fern Barr 

Marshall - - - - - - - - Leda Dunton 

MEMBERS 

Geraldine Foley Effie Rasher 

Margaret Greep Alzina Reed 

Dorothy Gudgell Eunice Schroeter 

JUNIETA HaRBES NlNA ShERWOOD 

Violet Heer Galvesta Siever 

Grace Kottwitz Loula Simmons 

Fern Maxey Dorothy Stevens 

Mildred McBride Ruby Stover 

Mary McCroskey Ruth Treadway 

LuELLA O'Neill Luella Vanderpool 

Leone Pacey Louise Ware 

Mildred Porter Maxine Wickham 

Nellie Pretz Grace Zeller 
Dorothy Raburn 



Baker 
Barr 

Brown, O. 
Brown, R. 
Charlton 



Cook 
Dunton 
Harbes 

Maxey 
O'Neill 



Porter 
Raburn 
Rasher 
Schroeter 



Sic)vi;r 

\' ANDIJU'OOl 

Waki; 











N^^ 







Literary Societies 



Li^. i L ■'■-» d M v^M AJm m^M 



iUM 




Albright 
Anderson 
Barry 
Bender 

Brill, Gertrude 
Brill, Grace 
Britt 

Brookens 
Carson 

Decker, B. 
Decker, I. 
Dilsaver 
Eads 

Fisher, Cleila 
Fisher, Janice 
Fisher, Vera 
Flinner 
Graham 
Guthrie 
Hamm 
Hester 

Horner 
Lattimore 

Leach 

LlNDSEY 

Long 

LoYD, B. 
LOYD, V. 

Lynch 
McClure 

MuNDELI, 

Obrecht 
Paulsen 
Porter, D. 
Porter, O. 

Price 
Quenzer 
Roberts 
Rockey 
Sawyer 
Sayre 

schreiner 
Shields 
Tribble 
Windiate 

ZiMMERS 



EurodelpMaii Literary Society 



First Semester 
DoRiNE Porter - 
Bessie Leach - 
Opal Mae Porter 
Thelma McClure 
Frances Wentz 
Lesta Lawrence 
Ruth Lattimore 



OFFICERS 

Vresuknt 

Vice-President 

KecnrJing Secretary 

Correspoiiditig Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Marshall 



Second Semester 
Bernice Bender 
Genevieve Long 
Dorothy Obrecht 
Irene Decker 
Frances Wentz 
Alice Triable 
Bernice Loyd 



Vivian ALDRiGur 
Vir<.inia Andeuson 
Louise Barry 
Bernice Bender 
Alice Brill 
Grace Brill 
Louie Britt 
Gertrude Brookens 
Nelda Carson 



Bernice Decker 
Irene Decker 
Nellie Dilsaver 
Miriam Eads 
Clella Fisher 
Janice Fisher 
Elsie Flinner 
Ruth Graham 
Eva Guthrie 



MEMBERS 

Frances Hester 
Ruth Lattimore 
Lesta Lawrence 
Bessie Leach 
Beulah Leach 
Evelyn Lindsey 
Genevieve Long 
Bernice Loyd 
Verna Loyd 



Margaret Lynch 
Thelm\ McClure 
Esther Mundell 
Dorothy Obrecht 
Nina Paulsen 
Dorine Porter 
Oi'AL Porter 
Claire Price 
Esther Quenzer 



Esther Rockey 
Eilleen Roberts 
Flossie Sawyer 
Norma Sayre 
Leah Schreiner 
Leota Shields 
Alice Tribble 
Frances Wentz 
Lois Windiate 



Pane 216 



Literary Societies 



Franklin Literary Society 



First Semester 
Laurel Owsley 
Kyle Engler 
Fern Dix 
Cecil Headrick 
Dale Oswalt 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 
Marshall - 



Second Semester 
Hazel Buck 
Marguriette Stullken 
Hugh Roth 
Howard Jobe 
Irene Todd 



MEMBERS 



dertha dark 
Fred Bosley 
Hazel Buck 
Margaret Buck 
Ida Chitwood 
Fern Dix 
Anna Edwards 
Clifford Eustace 
Grace Eustace 
Verona Fark 
Marvin Freeland 
Orville French 
Harvey German 
Grace Gould 
Cecil Headrick 
Robert Hodgson 
Ed. Hulland 
Howard Jobe 
Dorthea LaFolletti 
Florence Landrum 
C. O. Little 
Benjamin Markley 
Ruth Miller 



Zola Miller 
Marshall McCulloh 
Emily McKenzie 
Dale Norris 
Dale Oswalt 
Carol Owsley 
Laurel Owsley 
Edith Painter 
Helen Pempleton 
Paul Perry 
Hugh Roth 
Myra Roth 
Curtis Sides 
Harold Stevens 
Russell Stewart 
MoNA Stoops 
Harold Stowe 
Marguriette Stullken 
Irene Todd 
Bess Tyree 
Aline Wegert 
Margaret Wegert 
Kathryn Whitten 




Owsley, Stewai' 
Sides, McKenzii 
Rorir. Painti;r, 



Literary Societies 




i'LHM H \1( \1\MS, ( 



ER. KaRNS 
.ISIRONG 

I R, Sanders 

... F. 

RCHEK, Crawford 



First Semester 
Paul Mears 
Rodney Harrison 
Dale Jones 
Howard McManis 
Chester Culham 
Marvin Naylor 



Oil Literar 

OFFICERS 



Vresident 
Vice-President - 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 
Marshall 



Second Semester 
Harold Crawford 
Chester Culham 
Henry Burt 
Roy Armstrong 
Howard McMannis 
Toe Fickel 





MEMBERS 








L. Allison 


J. Fickel 


c. 


Mantz 


VV. ScHULTIS 


R. Armstrong 


G. Fletcher 


E. 


Mason 


J. Shafer 


B. Atwood 


M. Franklin 


P. 


Mears 


V. SlEBERT 


W. Babbit 


J. Hanna 


R. 


Melville 


J. Smerchek 


E. Bennett 


R. Harrison 


G. 


, Miller 


J. Speer 


T. Blake 


R. Hodler 


L. 


Miller 


H. Stapleton 


W. Braun 


C. Hollingsworth 


C. 


Monteith 


V. Stewart 


J. Bonfield 


R. Hughes 


M 


. Naylor 


L, Stoneking 


F. Booth 


G. Isaac 


w 


. Newman 


F. Tempero 


H. Burt 


R.James 


R. 


Parker 


H. Tempero 


C. Collins 


G. JOINES 


R. 


Patterson 


F. Thackrey 


R. Conrad 


D. Jones 


L. 


Perkins 


W. TOMLINSON 


H. Crawford 


E. Karns 


K. 


Pfuetze 


H. Trekell 


C. Culham 


O. Leasure 


R. 


Pfuetze 


M. Wells 


T. DiCKEN 


H. McClure 


E. 


Reed 


C. WiMER 


F. Edijn 


P. McKlNNIE 


M 


. Sanders 




C. Emel 


H. McManis 


F. 


SCHULTIS 





'mmmmmm^^^B^ 



WS^^^^iM 



Literary Societies 



Ionian Literary Socie 



OFFICERS 



Virst Semester 
Ruth McCammon 
Leone Wilson 
Ruth Mary Boyles 
Mildred Rathbun 
Arlee Murphy - 
Mildred Edlin 
Helen Parcels - 
Mabel Roepke 
Louise Reed 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer - - ' 

Marshall - 
Assistant Marshall 
Artist - - - - 
Critic - - - 



Second Semester 
Annie Kerr 
Maujorie Curtis 
Mabel Roepke 

SiGRID BeCKSTROM 

Rachel Lamprecht 
Edna Findley 
Daphyne Smith 
Geraldine Johnston 
Ruth McCammon 



MEMBERS 



Grace Bell 
Dorothy Barlow 

SiGRID BeCKSTROM 

Ruth Mary Boyles 
Margaret Boys 
\'ada Burson 
Doris Butrum 
Marjorie Curtis 
Frances Covey 
Frances Conard 
Elizabeth Crawford 
Nellie Darrah 



HiLMA Davis 
Louise Davis 
Mildred Edlin 
Katrina Eskeldson 
Edna Findley 
Alice Louise Finch am 
Geraldine Freeman 
Eva Filson 
Thalia Follmer 
Lavone Goheen 
Letha Goheen 
Frances Hampshire 



Myrtle Horne 
Helen Harrison 
Olive James 
Esther Jones 
Winifred Johnson 
Geraldine Johnston 
Anna Jones 
Annie Kerr 
Rachel Lamprecht 
Frances Maxwell 
Ruth Mears 
Merna Miller 



Ruth McCammon 
Marjorie Moulton 
Grace Mundell 
Arlee Murphy 
Rudy Nelson 
Lucille Nelson 
Helen Parcels 
Irene Piper 
Elizabeth Poole 
Elizabeth Pfuetze 
Elsie Rand 
Ruth Richardson 



Mildred Rathbun 
Louise Reed 
Anna Reed 
Thelma Reed 
Mabel Roepke 
Dorothy Rosencrans 
Mabel Ruthi 
Helen Smerchek 
Libbie Smerchek 
Pauline Samuel 
Venita Schade 
Gertrude Seyb 



Vera Strong 
Frieda Sloop 
Daphyne Smith 
Mary Alice Schnacke 
Selma Turner 
Helen Van Pelt 
Olive Van Pelt 
Heloise Wood 
Frances Wagar 
Estelle Winters 
Leone Wilson 



BeCKSTROM 

Child 
Conard 
Crawford 
Curtis 

Eskeldson 



Filson 
Freeman 
Goheen 
Harrison 
Horne 
Johnston 



Kerr 

Lamprecht 

McCammon 
Maxwell 
Nelson 
Pfuetze 



Poole 
Rathbun 
Reed, A. 
Reed, L. 
Richardson 
Roepke 



Ruthi 
Sloop 

Van Pelt, H. 
Van Pelt, O. 
Wagar 




Literary Societies 




BoZARTH 

Chase 
Kenison 

KOVAR 



McCuLLEY 

Meroney 
New 
Pettit 



Russell 
Smith 
Todd 



Ward 

Worthy 



Webster Literary Society 



OFFICERS 



Fust Sennstcr 
R. H. Anderson 
E. H. Smith 
A. E. Chase 
C. H. Kenison 
CiiAs. Todd 



Prcndent 
Vice-President - 
Corresponditig Secretary 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 



Second Semester 

L. J. KoVAR 

A. E. Chase 
E. H. Smith 
R. F. Pettit 
Robert Russell 



R. H. Anderson 
F. M. Bozartii 
A. E. Chase 
Kermit Enoel 
H. L. Fatzer 
E. E. Fauchier 
C. H. Kenison 
J., j. Kovar 



MEMBERS 

Noel League 

E. p. MtCuLLEY 

Thomas Meroney 

F. W. Moehlman 
F. A. Mueller 
H. R. New 

H. J. Nonamaker 



W. H. Painter 
R. F. Pettit 
R. H. Russell 

E. H. Smith 
C. C. Todd 
Chester Ward 
C. M. Worthy 

F. B. Zapata 



mmmmm^msmss^^mB^m 



'^m^m^^mmm^m-^i 



Page 220 



Activities 



A LPHA KAPPA PSI is a professional commerce fraternity. It is established in most of the leading schools of 
commerce and business administration in the United States. Election to membership requires outstanding 
ability in the field of commerce. 






MEMBERS 




E. E. Fauchier 


Randle Rolps 


J. P. BONFIELD 


C. T. LORENZ 


V. C. RowE 


James Pratt 


Harold McKinsey 


Dale S. Snider 
Gordon Blair 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 


D. L. Yeakley 


J. E. Kammeyer 


H. M. Stewart 
A. R. Jones 


Leo Spurrier 



BONFIELD 
LoRENZ 

RowE 



Snider 

O. Thurow 



R. Thurow 
Yeakley 




Wk%A 




SI 




Page S21 



Activities 




Hamm, Martenez. Richardson. Gill. Ossmann. Hoei-enlr, Parker 
McCammon, Dunlap, Litwiller. Marsh Jelinek. Fisk, Bakri, Horn 
Kim. Ivnerr, Copeland. Kenison. Audant. Della, Mannen 
DowD. Fickel. Jones. Edinborouch, Griggs. Davis. Kenison, Everhardy 
Zener. Adam, Herman, Filson, Coyle, Hull, Melton 



Cosmopolitan Club 

nPHE K. S. A. C. chapter of Corda Fratres, the Association of Cosmopolitan Cluhs of America, was organized 
in May, 1921. Since that date twenty-nine countries have been represented in this group. The ultimate 
aim of the cluh is to develop in the world the spirit of human justice, co-operation, and brotherhood, and 
the desire to serve humanity unlimited bv color, race, nationality, caste, or creed. 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

Baha Bakri ------ President 

Yum Sur Kim ----- Vice-President 

Carl Ossmann ----- Secretary 

Carl Martinez - . _ - Treasurer 



Second Semester 
Charles Kenison 
Francis Coyle 
Wilbur McDaniel 
Raymond Hoeiener 



MEMBERS 



CiRiLO Adam 
LoREN Allison 
Andre Audant 
Baha Bakri 
Robert Copeland 
Francis Coyle 
Louise Davis 
Salvador Della 
Grace E. Derby 
Martha Dunlap 
Howard Edinboro 
Louise Everhardy 
Ruth Fertig 
Joe Fickel 
Eva Filson 
Josephine Fisk 
Max Fleming 
Walter Gill 
Ethel Griggs 
Georgia Hamm 
Esther Herman 



Raymond Hoefener 
Elsa Horn 
Aileen Hull 
George Jelinek 
Charles Kenison 
Yum Sur Kim 
Margaret Knerr 
Earl Litwiller 
Ruth McCammon 
Wilbur McDaniel 

gh Jessie McD. Machir 

Robert Mannen 
Miriam Marsh 
Carl Martinez 
Alice Melton 
Carl Ossmann 
John H. Parker 
James Richardson 
Francisco Taberner 
J. T. Willard 
Flor Zapata 

Myrtle Zener 



Page 222 



Activities 



Encliiladas 



ipNCHILADAS, honorary Panhellenic dancing organization, was founded at K. S. A. C. in 1917. Its purpose 
■^ is to further inter-fraternity social spirit. 



OFFICERS 



Norma Koons 
Jeanette Verser 



President 
Secretiiry-Trea surer 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Anna Annan 
Catherine Halstead 
Mildred Jones 
Leah Gibbs 
Kathryn Wilson 
Norma Koons 



Alpha Xt Delta 
Ruth Claeren 
Margaret McKinney 

LORNA ScHMIDLER 

JuANiTA Walker 
Pattie Kimball 
Gretchen O'Connor 



"ieta Phi Alpha 
Dorothy Obrecht 
La Verne Huse 
Marion Greene 
LiLLiE Olson 
Bernice Cousins 
Neva Rush 



Chi Omega 

Marjorie Manshardt 
Marie Arbuthnot 
Hilah Crocker 
Kathleen Hulpieu 
Eleanor Laughead 
Lillian Havley 



MEMBERS 

Delta Delta Delta 
Georgena Bowman 
Helen Sloan 
Katherine Taylor 
Jo Keep 
Edith Loomis 
Mildred Purcell 



Delta Zeta 

Dorothy Wagner 
Mary K. Chronister 
Leota Shields 
Ruth Widestrand 
Jo Clark 
Marjorie Stafford 



Kappa Delta 

Virginia Van Hook 
Vera Walker 
Vesta Walker 
Thelma Carver 
Vera Bowersox 
Electa Hull 



Kappa Kappa Gannna 
Eugenia Leighton 
Emily Downing 
Jeanette Verser 
Bea Woodworth 
Ruth Emrich 
Margaret Darden 



/ Beta Phi 
Laura Hart 
Helen Randall 
Helen Hughes 
Ruth Allen 
Agnes McClaren 
loNE Strickland 



Phi Omega Pi 
Wanda Riley 
Frances Conard 
Velma Hahn 
Geraldine Foley 
Genevieve Long 
Ruth Gordon 



Beaty 

Bowersox 
Claeren 
Conard 
Crocker 
Darden 

Downing 
Foley 

Halstead 
Hughes 
Huse 
Jones 

Keep 

Kimball 
Koons 
Leighton 
McKinney 
Manshardt 

Obrecht 
O'Connor 

Olson 
Purcell 
Randall 



schmidler 
Sloan 

Van Hook 
Verser 
Wagner 



Walker, J. 

Walker, Vera 
Walker, Vesta 
WoonwoRTii 









m I THI 







Pa PC 2i'S 



Activities 




Richardson, Leece Simmons, Stepanek, McCroskey, Bloom, Bland, Marsh, Oberhelman, Brown Quenzer. Nuzv 

Fritz, Weygandt, Porter, Hay, Howard, Bland, Curry, Adams, Stewart, Johnson, Leach, Doty 

Jones Briscoe, Parrott. Dii. saver, Crowley, Decker, Edelblute, Harbes, Dietz. Johnston, Eads 

Andres, Johnson, Stover, Dunton, Ware, Buck, Baker, Krause, Lindsey, Lattimore 

Leonard, Follmer. Barkley, Treadway, Tolin, Porter, Heer, Maxey 

Alexander. Limper, Barr, Smethurst, Hughes, Rogers, Allison, McBurney 



a Fill 

¥/' APPA Phi was organized at the University of Kansas in 1916 to form a closer association among Methodist 
women who are students in the state and independent universities; to make work among women of the 
denomination more effective and sufficient to maintain a more servicable organization to take care of incoming 
Methodist freshmen and to provide in a college woman's way — religious training, and stronger more efficient 
women of the church of tomorrow. There are now twenty-one active chapters. 



OFFICERS 

Fern Barr -------- President 

Genevieve Crowley ------ Vice-President 

Lou LA Simmons ------- Corresponding Secretary 

Mary Barkley ------- Recording Secretary 

Violet Heer ------- Treasurer 

Orpha Brown ------- Chaplain 

Louise Ware ------- Historian 

Mrs. B. a. Rogers ------ Sponsor 

Rev. B. a. Rogers ------ Advisor 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Harry Smethurst ---------- Manhattan, Kansas 

Mrs. E. L. Knostman ----------- Junctio>i City, Kansas 

Mrs. Frederick Hawke ---------- Alhanibra, California 

Mrs. H. E. Wolfe ----------- Topeka, Kansas 

Mrs. Laura Robinson - - - -- -- - - - Chicago, Illinois 



Mrs. O. E. Allison 

Dr. M. Justin 



PATRONESSES 

Mrs. Am: Johnson 



Mrs. J. S. Hughes 



Mrs. L. H. Limper 



Page S2J, 



Activities 



Lutk 



eran 



sociation 



npHE purpose of this association is to afford a means whereby Lutheran Students may become acquainted with 
each other, consider and act upon their common problems, and strengthen and encourage each other in Christian 
faith and in Jovaltv to the church. 



OFFICERS 
Clarence Rinard 
Luther Monell _ . _ _ 
Virginia Schwager Hoglund 
Dorothy Schrumpf 



President 
Vice- President 
Secretary 
Trea Hirer 



MEMBERS 



Helen Axelton 
F. E. Booth 
Carrol Carlgren 
Paul Condry 
Emma Deere 
Rev. Armour Edberg 
Kenneth Ekdahl 
Inez Ekdahl 



Oscar Ekdahl 
Minnie Hahn 
Raymond Hoglund 
Virginia S. Hoglund 
Irving Johnson 
Julius Kloepper 
Arthur Lungren 



Luther Monell 
George Mueller 
Clarence Rinard 
Dorothy Schrumpf 
Fredrick Schultis 
William Schultis 
Gladys Tonn 
John Vaupel 



Monell 
Rinard 



Schrumpf 
Hoglund 




Activities 




THACKREY 



PuM 



IPUBLICITY for Kansas State Agricultural College is handled hv four men, three of whom are members of 
the college faculty and one, a student. Prof. H. W. Davis, head of the English department, and Gene Charles 
and Russell Thackrey of the journalism department, are the faculty members engaged in advertising the school 
and the student member is Fred Seaton, director of publicity for the athletic department. 

A news bureau is maintained in the journalism department, headed by Charles and Thackrey, which makes 
daily mailings over the state and to the larger papers of the country, concerning general news of the college 
and of the activities of the college students. In addition to this general service, a weekly mailing of "personals" 
is made to Kansas newspapers. These ct)nsist of small items about the activities of K. S. A. C. students from 
those towns. 

The athletic department has gradually expanded its publicity department, inaugurated four years ago, until 
now it is one of the most complete and thorough in the Big Six conference. Seaton has been in charge for the 
past two years. 

A daily mailing service of free news material is mailed to Kansas and Big Six dailies, and a weekly mailing 
service is maintained to all Kansas weeklies. Photos of the men engaged in the various sports are supplied free 
of charge to the larger papers and news cuts and mats are sent gratis to anv paper wishing them. 

Radio broadcasting of athletic contests was begun several years ago, but was thought to be interfering to 
some extent with attendance. Last season the basketball games were not broadcast. This year, however, 
the publicity department decided again to put the games on the air, and Prof. Davis and Seaton worked 
together in announcing the games. The accounts are broadcast over KSAC, the college's own station. 



SiS£^rt^;^?%?»^Si?r5^5?:^sSS^5:^ 



'smm?mm^smmmM^i 



Activities 



111 



la 



Phi Mu Alpha was founded in 1898 at the Boston Conservatory of Music 

Tau Chapter was established in 1921 

Colors — Red, Black, and Gold Publication — The Sinfoniai 



Phi Mu Alpha is a national honorary musical fraternity. Its purpose is to advance the cause of music in America, 

and in the Alma Mater. 

OFFICERS 

B. R. Prentice ------ President 

P. R. Chilen - - - - Vise-President 

Homer Yoder ------ Secretary 

L. C. Paslay - ----- - Trearm-er 

A. E. Winkier ------ Histanaii 



H. T. Blancha 
J. W. Burke 
E. K. Chapin 
P. R. Chilen 
G. T. Collins 
M. D. Davis 
E. W. Green 



MEMBERS 
W. F. Hardman 
W. S, Hemker 
}. G. Htlyard 
J. H. Karr 

C. W. Meagher, Deceased 
B. E. Markley 
J. R. Math I AS 



H. H. McCord,Jr. 
Austin Morgan 
C. G. Ossmann 
L. C. Paslay 
R. L. Peters 
C. E. Powell 
F. G. Powell 



B. R. Prentice 

C. E. Reeder 
R. H. Russell 

D. A. Thomas 

G. E. TOBUREN 

A. E. Winkler 
Homer Yoder 



Blanchard 
Burke 
Chilen 
Collins 
Davis 



Hemker 
Karr 
Mathias 
Ossmann 
Paslay 



Peters 

C. E. Powell 
F. G. Powell 
Prentice 



Reeder 
Russell 
Thomas 
Yoder 




Activiti 



les 




BONP 



Brookens 
Child 



COWDERY 



Harbes 
Pfuetze 
Price 

SCHAFER 



Taylor 
Terrell 
Wagar 



T})! KAPPA DELTA is a national honorary forensic fraternity for students who participate in oratory, debate, 
and public speaking. The fraternity was founded at Ottawa University in January, 1914. 



James Bonfield • 
Frances Wagar 
Gertrude Brookens 



Pre udent 

V ic(-Vresideiit 

Seen tary-Trea n 



James P. Bonfield 
Cjerirudf, Brookens 
John T. Cor r ell 
Herman Cowdery 



MEMBERS 

Junieta Harbes 
Solon T. Kimball 
Helen Mangelsdori 
DarrellJ. Mase 
Karl H. Pfuetze 



Claire Price 
Gladys Schafer 
James Taylor 
Frances Wagar 



^Msgl^^gS^^^§^55^^ 



mj^^i^^^s^m^m^^^ii^ 



Activities 



T})RIX is an honorary Junior women's organization formed at K. S. A. C. in 1916. Election is based on scholarship, 
leadership, and cooperation in college activities of all kinds. Membership remains secret until new members 
are elected in the spring. 

OFFICERS 



Pauline 


Samuel - - - - 


President 




Esther Rockey - - - . 


Vtce-Prestdent 




Geraldine Johnston 


Secretary-Treasurer 


Helen \ 


^AN Pelt - - - - 

MEMBERS 1929-1930 


Marshall 




Geraldine Johnston 


Esther Rockey 




Gladys Schmedemann 


Norma Koons 


Helen Randall 




Helen Sloan 


Eugenia Leighton 


Pauline Samuel 




Helen Van Pelt 


DoRiNE Porter 






Vesta Walker 



Johnston 
KooNs 
Porter 



Randle 
Rockey 

Samuel 



Sloan 

Van Pelt 
Walker 




Activities 




^^^ 



Bender 
Claeren 
Hemphill 



Price 
Sloan 

Smiley, E. 



Smiley, H. 
Sperling 



ub ■ 

nPHE American College Quill Club, national honorary society for writers, was organized at the 
Kansas in ]900. The chapter at Kansas State was mstalled in 1914. Membership is based on 
some kind of literary production. Membership contests are held each semester and meetings are held t 
for the purpose of stimulating literary effort and criticism among the members. 

OFFICFRS 



University of 

excellence in 

wice a month 



Helen Sloan 


. 


Chancellor 




Katherine Bower - 


Vice-Chance 1 1 or 




R. 


I. Th ackrey 




Warden of the Purse 




Ruth Claeren 




Keeper of the Parchim 


'Ht 


Esther Smiley 


. 


Scribe 




R, 
H 


W. Con()ver\ 
, W. Davis / 


MEMBERS 


Members h '/; Qiiiiniitt 


ee 


Blhnicl Bender 




Helen Hemphili 




Helen Sloan 


Ruth Claeren 




Johnson Holmes 




Frieda Sloop 


J. C. Dalgarn 


' 


Lawrence N. M 


arx 


H. Devore Smiley 


F. Marshall Davis 




Claire Price 




Esther Smiley 


Clare Harner 




Marjorie Pyle 




Mary Marie Sperling 


Russell Hastings 




Louise Rust 




Ruth Wilkerson 


Elsie Flinner 




J. Foster Scott 






WM^0:^ 


^m^^^^^ms^mmKm^^^^^^^^m^^ 






Page 230 







Act IV It it: 



Scara] 



OCARAB is a senior honorary society founded at K. S. A. C. in 1914. The group fosters all worthy senior 
activities, centering its attention toward maintaining an active interest ui school politics. At the close of 
each school vear twenty-hve outstandmg men of the junior class are chosen to hll the ranks of Scarab. 



OFFICERS 

E. O. Habiger --------- President 

A. P. Shelly --------- Vice-President 

C. L. Brainard -------- Secretary 

C. E. Nutter ---..--_ Treasurer 



M. F. Allison 
H, W. Baker 

W. BOOGESS 
H. C. BOLEY 
J. P. BONFIELD 

C. L. Brainard 
W. R. Denman 
H. S. Dole 
T. H. GiLE 
J. H. Green 
E. O. Habiger 



E. F. Jenista 

M. j. KiNDIG 
G. H. KOELLING 

H. G. Manoelsdori 
C. E. Nutter 
W. C. Perham 
R. C. Riepe 
W, E. Russell 
A. P. Shelly 
M. M. Taylor 
W. L. Treaster 



J. J. Yeager 




Activities 




Adriance 

DiTTEMOHE 

Dole 



Holmes 
Kimball 
Richardson 



Scott 
Taylor 
Watson 



Sigma ueira ^ni 

OIGMA DELTA CHI was founded at DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind., April 17, 1909. Its purposes are to 
^ associate college journalists of talent, truth, and energy into a more intimately organized unit of good fellow- 
ship; to assist the members in acquiring the noblest principles of journalism and to co-operate with them in this 
field; and to advance the standards of the press by fostering a higher ethical code. Active members are chosen from 
students in good standing in the college who intend to make journalism their life work. The Kansas State chapter 
was founded in 1915. 

First Semester OFFICERS Second Semester 

Solon Kimball -------- President -------- Harold Taylor 

Harry S. Dole -- - Vice-President ------ Richard Dickens 

John C. Watson ------- Secretary -------- Paul L. Dittemore 

Earl C. Richardson - - Treasurer ------- Foster Scott 

MEMBERS 

Jay Adriance Paul Dittemore Solon Kimball Kermit Silverwood 

John Bird Kenneth Gapen Earl Richardson Harry S. Dole 

Quentin Brewer Johnson Holmes Foster Scott Harold Taylor 

Rk HARD Dickens James Howard Fred Seaton John Watson 



Page S32 



MOST BEAUTIFUL KANSAS STATE WOMEN 




-*• 



*% 





MISS EDITH BOCKENSTETTE 




MISS RUTH SMITH 




MISS RUTH O'DONOVAN 




MISS ROBERTA OURSLER 




MISS MAXINE STANLEY 




MISS CORA STOUT 



1 



fk.vi'i<:rntty of phi ciamnfa delta 



lb. 24. 1930 



ilr. Chiolc Allison 

/JTha 1930 Koyal Purple 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Dear Ghlok: 

Wall, the fire is o^yr. ',Va have oomplatea 
jadging, aiid hope it has been carried out in a 
way. 

I Tilsh yoa ooalol haua been here to share o 
sure STsry "orother enjoyed thia idea of yours, 
certainly have sone fair co-ads on your oampao. 
felloTSS uantua to krio« xf thara was any vsj tc 
names aril •i'^" " ■ 



the be 


auty 


satiafc 


otory 


ur f'on 


I am 


and thj 


A yoa 


Some 


of the 


.43 311JS 


taelr 




As chosen by the members of the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity 
who study dihsently at the Oreson State College at Corvallis. 



With many thanks from the editor! 



WINTER WANDERINGS 



Miss Vera Smith 
Winter Qiiecn 





Of course there were parties and 
parties throughout the year; pic- 
tures of the good ones were the ones 
we tried to get. At the top can be 
seen the jolly crowd which at- 
tended the Winter Frolic, while 
at the left the students are iust 
about to elect the Winter Queen. 
In the center, the Alpha Delts and 
their boy friends are looking like 
a bunch of tough eggs from the 
Bowery, and what we mean is 
tough, not maybe. At the left 
below may be seen the first formal 
dinner party of the year, that 
given by Beauvais, and the two 
lower pictures on the page were 
taken at the fifth annual military 
ball. 





The ManhattHn Theatre brought 
to the college some of the newest 
and best stage plays during the 
year. Among them were "The 
Queen's Husband, " "Young 
W o d 1 e y , " and ' ' H o 1 i d a \- . " 
Above and at the bottom, B 
Johnson, versatile Negro boy, puts 
on some of the most finished 
amateur acting that was ever 
presented to a college audience 
here. The play was "The Emperor 
Jones." The other pictures are 
stage settings taken from 
"Holiday." At the right may be 
seen the genial director of the 
Theatre, H. Miles Heberer. "The 
19th Hole," final production of 
the season, featured James Pratt, 
a Manhattan product and a wonder 
ai light comedy. 



\HJ 



& 



^m^m: 



/W^'^'m- 




The Aggie campus has a reputation for its 
beauty all over the central part of the 
country, and certainly this beauty was 
enhanced by the heaviest snow fall of the 
vear. The pictures presented on this page 
were taken during this time, and il you 
fail to appreciate them, you certainly have 
no sympathy for the feet of the editor 
which were almost frozen while the 
pictures were being taken. Nevertheless 
It was worth the effort, and we have 
placed them here so that you may keep 
ever fresh in mind the scenes that must 
have thrilled you during the winter season. 




(111)1 ,»tlOi ,i\; 
'ff I III 1 1. 

ill: III ill Hi 




The beauty of the campus by day is rivalled only 
bv its sheer lovliness at night. Soft white snow 
took away hard lines, and transformed the entire 
campus into acres of diamonds. The north door of 
Anderson and the library from the northeast appear 
at the top. The recently completed power plant 
appears in the center, and at the right may be seen 
the feudal towers of Nichols gymnasium. At the 
right the lights and shadows of the Engineering 
building make a pleasing contrast, while below 
there are other views of Fairchild and the gym- 
nasium. 



i 



■^'^. 



The judges reported that they had a hard time 
placing the six most beautiful girls out of the great 
number of pictures sent to them, and anyone can 
see they were right by looking at this page. From 
left to right the girls are: Eldana Stewart, Kappa 
Delta, Eskridge; Norma Koons, Alpha Delta Pi, 
Sharon Springs; Ruby Nelson, Phi Omega Pi, 
Jamestown; Virgiline Hanes, Alpha Delta Pi, 
Augusta; Frances Larson, Beta Phi Alpha, 
Smolan; Mabel Ruthi, Van Zile hall, Bloomington ; 
Frances Ellsworth, Chi Omega, Formoso; Eva 
Filson, Van Zile hall, Scott City; and Naomi 
Cook, Phi Omega Pi, Linn. 



K 



/ / 



- • * 



^-. 





That the Fee Gees are no gamblers is 
shown by the bets they passed up on 
this page. They congratulated all the 
girls on their good looks, and re- 
gretted that there were such few 
places to be awarded. The bets they 
missed: Johnnie Moore, Alpha Xi 
Delta, Minneola;Clare Wilson, Alpha 
Delta Pi, Onaga; Eleanor Laughea ' 
Chi Omega, Dodge City; H 
Durham, Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
Manhattan; Eliazbeth Smerchek, 
Beta Phi Alpha, Cleburne; Juanita 
Walker, Alpha Xi Delta, " Valley 
Falls; Lillie Olson, Beta Phi Alpha, 
Manhattan; Sybil Parks, Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Parsons; and Melba 
Doyle, Alpha Delta Pi, Eskridge. 




41, r,* '^ 



.>€'- 



V. 



'K\ 



^ 



BOOK THREE 



'^ 




t^ 



■in 

P C PRINC'S FANCIES TURN NOT 
J ONLY. TO THOUGHTS OF 
LOVE BUT TO SENIORS AND GRAD- 
UATION BALMY AFTERNOONS 
BRING BASEBALL AND TRACK, AND 
THE INTRAMURAL SPORTS FALL 
INI ATTENTIONI THE MILITARY 
MEN ARE HERE. , LAST OF ALL, 
SPRING ZEPHYRS BLOW AND BRING 
DO LETS HURRY I . 



s 



p 



R 








^^^m(^. 



N 



C 



Seniors 




Senior Class Officers 



First Semester 



Gabe Drollinger 
Gertrude Sheetz 
Henry Barre 
Marie Arbuthnot 
Lawrence Norton 
Gertrude Brookens 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 

Marshall 

Devotional Leader 



Second Semester 



MiLFORD J. KiNDIG - 

Mary Bell Read - 
Grace Editha Reed 
James J. Yeager 
Erwin Hollingsworth 
Tames Wilson Pratt 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshall 

Devotional Leader 




Seniors 







VIVIAN D ABELL 

Home Economics 

Riley 
Omicron Nu, Phi Kappa Phi, Girls 
Meat Judging Team, Home Economics 
Association, Y. W. C..A. 



RAYMOND H. ALEXANDER 

Veterinary Medicine 

Harlan, Iowa 
Alpha Gamma Rho, Junior American 
Veterinary Medical Association. 



FRANK M. ADAIR 

Mechanical Engi 



G. M ALLEN 

Ciiiil Engineering 

Manhattan 
Mortar and Ball, A. S. C. E., Cadet 
Colonel R. O. T. C. (4,. 



ROLAND E. ADAMS 

Archilerlural Engineering 

Manhatt 
Gargovie Club. 



MILTON F ALLISON 

Jnduilrial Journalism 

Great Bend 
Sigma Nu, Scarab, Scabbard and Blade. 
The Friars, Class President (2); Fresh- 
man Commission. Manager Aggie 
Orpheum (2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(2. 3); Y. M. C. A. Board (4), Edicor, 
The Brown Bull (2, 3); Vice-President 
Student Council (3;; Member Student 
Council (4); Head Cheerleader (3. 4); 
Captain. R. O. T. C. (4); "The Poor 

Nut. Fommy," "ThcGreen Goddess," 

Editor. The 1930 Royal Purple. 



JAY ADRIANCE 

Industrial Journali 



Sigma Delta Chi 
(4) 



K. C. ANDERSON 

Cliemical Eng 



Manhattan 
Brown F^ull 



Eskridge 



ROSS I 1. ANDERSON 
General Scien. 



'hi Delta Kappa, Wehslcr, Y. M. C. A. 



ARIUJ 
Horn 



Be 



Chi Omcg.i, Cla.ss Historian (3); Class 
Secretary (4); Enchiladas, Aggie Pop 
(2); Aggie Orpheum (3); .Senior Invita- 
tion Committee. 



B'lRON E. ATWOOD 
Electrical Engin 



Delta Nu Omega. A. I. E. E.. Hamiltc 



I lARRISON I- AX I ELL 
Agriculture 

Dimmin-, I exas 
Phi Lambda Thcta. Lambda Tau 
Kappa, Alpha Beta. Klod and Kernel 
Klub. 



wm 



^ 



s^^^^^ 



Seniors 




d^^kiMiJt 




DON C. BALDWIN 

Archili-clure 



C O. BAKER HOWARD W. BAKER MILDRED M. BAKER 

Civil Engineering Architecture Home Economics 

Marysville Lyndon Gove Manhattan 

Phi Kappa Tau. A. S. C. E.. President; Alpha Rho Chi, Gargoyle, Pax, Scarab. (Imicron Nu, Y. W. C:, A , Browning, Delta Nu Omega, \'. \\. C.. A Cabinet. 

Freshman Men's Panhellenic. Engin- Kappa l^hi, Llume Leonomics Associa- Gargoyle Club, Engineer's Open House 

eering Council. tion. Committee (4). 



MARY E BARKLEY 

General Science 

Manhattan 
Kappa Phi, \. W. C. A., lirowning. 



CLAUDE 1,. BARNEIT LAWRENCE R BARNl lAR 1 
Architecture InJ. Journalism 

Manhailan Indepi 

Gargoyle Club, 



FERN D BARR 

Geru-rM Science 

Manhattan 
l^hi Kappa Phi. Phi ,Mpha Mu. lunior 
Basketball Team, Intcrsocietv Debate 
(?): Kappa Phi, President (4); Y. W. 
C:. A. C:abinel, Browning. 



1 lENRY J BARR1-; 

Agruidliirul lingmeei 



VERNON A BECK 
Mechanical /-.' 



Phi Sigma K;ippa Sigma lau. I-rcsh- Sit 

man l'o,,ihall. Iicshm.-m BaseKill, Ri 

"K" Lralernin, Slecl Ring, l-oolb.ill M 

(3, 4). B.iseball ( !, 4); B.iskelball (!) Cc 



SKiRin 1 Bl ( K.si ROM IM 1 I I Bl I Bl' 

llanu /•,,./i,.ni„.v Wiennary \le,luinc 

Ua Wi.lui.i M.inl- 

id 'I W ( A Innum lunm, \mene,ui \etenn,u\ M 

S ,\ssoci.ilion 



Kiiv Manager (4) 



Seniors 








RAYMOND A. BELL 


BERNICE E. BENDER 


HELEN LEE BENTLEY 


WESLEY W. BERTZ 


Physical Education 


Ind. Journalism 


Home Economics 


Veterinary Medicine 


Beverly 


Holton 


Manhattan 


Odessa, Mo. 


Phi Kappa Phi. Phi Delta Kappa, Foot- 


'Iheta bigma F^hi, Quill Club. Eurodei- 
phian. President (4); Intersociety 


4-H Club. Home Economics Assn. 


Junior American Veterinary Medicine 


ball C3, 4) ; Baseball (2. 3, 4) ; Swimming 




Association. 


(4); Intramural (1, 2 3, 4j; Band (1. 


Council Collegian Staff; Y. W. C. K. 






2) ; Chorus (2, 4). Sophomore Honors. 


Stephens College (1,2). 






HENRY J. BESLER 


JOHN A. BIRD 


OLIVE E. BLAND 


WM. R. BOGGESS 


Electrical Engineering 


Ind. Journalism 


Home Economics 


Electrical Enf.,neering 


Manhattan 


Hays 


Garden City 


Sc.india 


A. LE. E. 


Beta Thcta Pi, Sigma Delta Chi, Ouill 
Club, Editor Brown Bull (3. 4); C.ol- 


Alpha Thcta Chi. Kappa Phi. Collegiate 






4-H Club. Browning, Y. W. C. A. 


Freshin. n"^..yA,..ui..u 1 l..|'v \ 1 'l ' \- .. 




Icgian Staff (3, 4); Kansas Authors 




TrcasuM. .mi>I \ „, 1',, „l,ni, S,i,.;h. 




Club, Freshmen Panhellenic, Chairman 




Pax, 1. S 1 , 1 ngmc., s Op, n 1 1, ,usc. 




Democratic Party Club (3). 






rC)NY BORECKY 


RLin 1 MARY BfWLES 


JOHN F. BOZICK 


HOWARD R. BRADLEY 


General Science 


1 lomc Economics 


Electrical EtiginecrinR 


AiJficullurul Administration 


Holyrood 


Manhattan 


Frontcnac 


Kidder. Mo. 


Alphq Sigma Psi. Scabbard and Blade, 


Ionian, Kappa Phi, Y W. C. A Big 
Sister, Big Sister Captain, Home Econ- 
omics .^ssociation 


K. S, T. C. of Pittsburgh (1, 2); A 1. 


Alpha Gamma Rho. Pax. Dairy Judg- 
ing Team (3): Stock Judging Team (3); 
Agricultural Economics Club (4); Agri- 


Firsi.. Lieut and Battalion Adjutant 
R. O. T. C;., Y. M. C. A., Assistant 
Manager Vox Pop Party (4). 


E. E. 






cultural Association. Kan.'-as Chick and 








Egg Show, Athenian 



Pane 252 



Seniors 






!->* ^ If' ^^^ 



Alttfc 




CHARLES L. BRAINARD 
Architecture 

Denver, Colo. 
Phi Kappa Tau, Sigma Tau, Class 
M;irsh;ill (?); Treasurer (3); Gargoyle 
< hill, l\;in^:i State Engineer (2, 3); 
I III'.! ( ti l';ix, Scarab, Manhattan 
ilii.iin, Si, I I King, Engineer's Open 
I luuac, I'lijin Manager (3); General 
Manager (4). 1929 Royal Purple. Senior 
Panhellenic, President (3). Kansas 
State Engineering Assn., Brown Bull. 



ORPllA BROWN 

Home Economics 

Edmond 
Omicron Nu, W. A. A., Basketball (2); 
Kappa Phi, Cabinet (4). Browning, 
President (4). Home Economics Assn. 
Meat Judging Team. 



WILLIAM J. BRAUN 
Agonomy 

Council Grove 
Alpha Gamma Rho, Track (2, 4) ; Foot 
ball (1,2 ) ; Cross Country (4) . Klod and 
Kernel Klub. Men's Glee Club (!, 2, 3, 
4). Hamilton. Y. M. C. A. Fourth 
Grain Judging (3). 



J. L. BRUBAKER 

Electrical Eng 



Phi Kappa Phi, A. I. 
Open House. 



S 

Manha 
E. E., Engin 



GERTRUDE E. BROOKENS 
General Science 

Westmoreland 
Phi Alpha Mu, Pi Kappa Delta, Devo- 
tional Leader (4); Eurodelphian, Inter- 
society Debate (1); Intersociety Ora- 
tory "(3). Regional Pi Kappa Delta 
Oratory (3). Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3. 4) 
Lambda Tau Kappa. 



HUGH H. BRUNER 

Commerce 

Concordia 
Sigma Pill I'psilon. Phi Delta Kappa, 
Pi Epsilun I'l, Collegiate 4-H Club. 
Men's Glee Club. Chorus, Debate, Y. 
M. C. A. Union Pacific Scholarship. 
Manhattan Theatre, "Is Zat So", 
"Just Suppose". 



EDWIN L. BROWER 

Veterinary Medicine 

Manhattan 
Alpha Psi. Alpha Sigma Psi. T. S. L.. 
Pax. Track (2); Pi Epsilon Pi. Junior 
American Vererinary Medical Assn. 
Senior Men's Panhellenic, Tobasco, 
Men's Glee Club (2, 3). 



HAZEL E BUCK 
Home Ec 



Franklin, President (41 
Home Economics .A.ssn. 



D()R( 



1 BURNET LESII'R BURTON NORVAI . (.X BU 1 I M< 

A/iplied Art Electrical Engineering Eleittual Ennmeenni: 

Manchester, Okla. Topcka MMiihauan 

Lambda 1 au Kappa, Home Economics ^, \ ''-,}'-- IVeasurer (4) Secrelary (4). Alpha Beta. 

Assn. Alpha Beti. Alpha^Bc<a.^Pres,dent (4), Nlanhailan _ 



Page 1S53 



Seniors 










DAVID A.CARLSON 


RAYMOND D. CAUGHRON 


BEATRIX L. CHARLTON 


ROSE LOUISE CHILD 


Agriculture Admtnistralion 


General Science 


Home Economics 


Ind. Journalism 


Manhattan 


Manhattan 


Edwardsville 


Manhattan 


Phi Kappa. Newman Club, Block and 
Bridle, T. S. L.. Tobasco 


Acacia, Basketball (1,2); Football (1,2); 
Baseball (1.2). 


Theta Epsilon, Browning, Baptists 
Students Cabinet and Council, Y, W. 
C. A., Cabinet, Home Economics. 
Assn. Kansas City, Mo, Junior College 


Phi Omega Pi, Motar Board, Pi Kappa 
Delta. Prix, Thcta Sigma Phi. Band 
(1. 2); Chorus (1); Ionian, President 
(4); Journalism Press Teams (2, 3); 
Varsity Debate (1. 2, 3); Wesley 
Foundation Cabinet (2, 3. 4); Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet (4). 


PAUL R CHILEN 


RUTFI R CLAEREN 


JOSEPH E.CLAIR 


CURTIS F. CLAYTON 


Agncullural Administralion 

Miltonvale 


Ind. Journalism 

Manhattan 


Veterinary Medicine 

Mcndon. Ill, 


Civil Engineering 

El Dorado 


Phi Mu Alpha, Junior and Senior Scock 
JudKLns Teams, Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). 


Alpha Xi Delta. Secretary Quill Club. 
Enchiladas. Royal Purple staff (3, 4); 
Y. W. C. A.. Senior Women's Panhel- 
lenic. Honor Roll (3, 4). 


Alpha Gamma Rho, lunior American 
Veterinary Medical Assn 


Engineer's Open House (4); Depart- 
mental Staff Kansas State Engineer, 
A. S. C. E. 


M.OYD A. CLAYTON 


LAWRENCE V. CLEM 


1 \ARR\ P. COBERLY 


MA.X W. COBLE 


Ind. Chemistry 


General Scierxce 


A/^ricullural Engineering 


Mechanical Engineering 


F.I Dorado 


Chanute 


Hutchinson 


Sedgwick 


American (■;hemical Society. 


Phi Beta SiKma. 


Sigma Nu. Freshman Commission, 
Bcauvais. Pax. A. S. A E . Secretary 

(4). 


Acacia. Scabbard and Blade. Rifle 
Team (3. 4); Y. M. C. A. Captain, R. 
O. T. C. (4); A. S. M. E. 






Page SS4 





Sm'i 



ors 





JOHN R. C:OLEMAN 


GARLIE F. COLLINS 


KENNETH W. COMFORT 


FRANCES R. CONARD 


Chemical Engineering 


Chemical Engineering 


Civil Engirwering 


Ho/7,.- Economics 


Wichita 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Topeka 


Ottawa 


Phi Kappa. Sisma 1 au, Scarab, Boxins 
Team i .' i I'.u m. M.mager 1"3() 
Royal I'uipl. I-- 1 1,11. mux. Pi Epsilon 
Pi, Seiii-i \l 11 I'.iiil,. M, iiK. Newman 
Gluh, I'lr.hl. Ill 1 ;. 1 .insas State 
Engineer In .i iii.i lii, 1 ngineerinf; 
Assn., Treasui. ■ I 1 ii'.unrr's Open 
House, Boxini; 111 1.11 ■..,■ a. 3, 4); 
Kansas State ( hnnuil Club, Phi 
Lambda Psi, ['resident (4) ; I'obasco. 


Kappa Sigma, Phi Mu Alpha, Band, 
Orchestra. 


Alpha Sigma Psi, A. S. C E. 


Phi Omega Pi. Ottawa University (\): 
Ionian, Lambda Tau Kappa. Y. W C. 
A, Kansas State 4-H Club, Enchiladas 
Band (3); OrcheSLra (3, 4); Home Eco- 
nomics As.sn. 


PAUL W. CONDRY 


UOBI.R 1 j c.op[:land 


111;RMANC, COWDliRY 


MANl't>RD L. COX 


/•.,/. Chemisdy 


Chemical Engineering 


Cnl Engineering 


.A.;r.ci//fiuv 


Beloir 


Canon City, Colo. 


l.M.lls 


Go<-dneh 


Band(1.2,3.4.; Y. M.C, A.Lu.hcran 
Students Assn., Chemical Club (3, 4). 


Cosmopolitan Club, Class Marshall (2) ; 
Ireasurer (3); Chemical Club (3, 4); 
Wise Club, President (4). 


Beta Iheta Pi, Sigma lau, Pi Kappa 
Delta, A. S. C. E., Varsity Debate (1. 
2, 3); Campus Chest (2): Y. M, C. A.. 
Freshman Commission (1). 


Meat ludging Team. ^. M. C. A,, 
Block and Bridle 


FRANCIS S. COYLE 


ANDY C:RA\VI'0RD 


1 lAKOl D S CRAWl tiRD 


\1:KA 1 CR \\\1 ttRII 


Agriculture 


\ cur, nary Medicine 


l.anclscaf.e Cardening 


Ind. h'Uinatism 


Bethel 


,\sh!and, Miss 


Bonner Springs 


Line ^In 


Y. M, C. A , C:<>sm<.p<.lii.in Club, Ath- 
enian, A..;rieullural hleonomies Club 


.Alpha Cimma Rh,), Pi b.psilon Pi. 
Senior Men's Panhellenie. lunu.r 
American Veterinary Me<.lieal .Assn . 
Advanced Cour.se R O. 1'. t: 


Phi Lambda Theta, Hamilton, Presi- 
dent (41. 1 lorlieuhure Club. Y. M. C. 
A t:abinel. A;;rK iilluial Assn. 


riieia Sigma Phi. Sigma Delta (.:hi 
AN\ard t4). Aggie Pop (,L !). Colleman 
StalT (!). 



Page «5J 



Seniors 







EARL E. CROCKER 


GEORGE J. CUNNINGHAM 


FRANCES REBEKAH CURTIS 


JOHN J. CURTIS 


Commerce 


Agncullure 


Home Economics 


Agriculture 


Manhaaan 


Manhattan 


Kansas City, Kans. 


Agronomy, Toronto 


Sigma Nu. 


Agriculture Assn , Newman Club, Klod 
and Kernel Klub. 


Kappa Kappa Gamma, Theta Pi, 
Glee Club (2. 3, 4); Orchestra (3, 4): 
Y. W. C A., Cabinet (3); The Mikado 
(2); The Bohemian Girl (3); The Sor- 
cerer (4). 


Phi Kappa Phi, Crops Judging Team. 


MARJORIE 1 1. CURTIS 


NELLIE DARRAl I 


SALOMA DAVIS 


BERNICE L DECKER 


Home Economics 


Home Economics 


Commerce 


Home Economics 


Manhattan 


Mc Pherson 


Carthage, Mo. 


Holton 


Ionian, Y. W. C. A. Big Sister Captain 
(3); Home Economics Assn., Collegiate 
4-H Club, Aguie Pop (3) : May Eete (1 ) ; 
Chorus (3), The Messiah. 


Kappa Delta, Ionian, Y. W. C. A , 
President (4); Secretary (3): Cosmo- 
politan Club, Home Economics- Assn.. 
Mc PhcTSon College (1,2). 


Delta Zeta, Ozark Wesleyan Ccllege, 
Carthage, Mo. (1, 2). 


Hockey (2): Swimming (2); Baseball 
(2); Kappa Phi, Eurodelphian, Home 
Economics Assn. 


iRENi: J di-cki:r 


JOI IN \V. Di:cKER 


CLARA I-. DliNISON 


WALIER R. DENMAN 


Home Economics 


Al,,icidn,re 


Generul .Science 


Elect ricol Engineering 


Robinson 


llolion 


1 lazelton 


Sedan 


Bcia Phi Alph.-i, l-urodclphian. Home 
|-.con<;mics Assn , Y W. C A 


l-arm House, Alpha Zeta, KloJ and 
Kernel Klub, f;rops Judging 1 eam (4) 


Y. W. C. A. 


Alpha Tau Omega, Steel Ring, Scarab. 
A. I. E. E., Secretary (4). 




^^^m^m&^m^^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^^^^^. 




Page £58 





Seniors 





ROBERT I. DENNY THEODORE M. DE VRIES 

Agricultural Engineering Veterinary Medicine 

Harper Orange City, la. 

A. S. A. E. Acacia, President Junior American 

Veferinary Medical Assn. (4). 



DONNA M. DICKINSON MARY LUCILE DIETZ 

Home Economics Home Economics 

Rock Caw ker City 

Alpha Delta Pi, Y. W, C. A., Home Kappa Phi, Collegiate 4-H Club, Y. 

Economics Assn., W. A. A. W. C. .'\., Home Economics Assn. 



HARRY S. DOLE DONNA GAYLE DUCKWALL ETHA C. DUNCAN CLARENCE M. DUNN 

I nd. Journalism Architecture Home Economics Agriculture 

Almcna Abilene Independence Oskaloosa 

Lanili.l:i ( 111 \l|.|i.i, Sniin.i I). Ii;i Chi, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Prix, Debate Agricultural Economics Club, ^■. K\. 

nic, (1) ; Gargoyle Club (1 , 2, 3) ; Secretary C. A., Winner Third Prize National 

ian (4); Aggie Pop (I, 4); Y. W. C. A. Saddle and Sirloin Club Essay Contest 



Scar; 1 1 

As 

(3), l',u,iu-,s \l:, ,,.,-,,, ( -ll.n,,,,, (4); 

Business Manager Brown Bull (4). 



(4). 



LEDA A. DUN TON NEIL i:)URl lAM EDNA l- i:i IRLICI I 

General Science ,\.;,,, „//„/.• Home luonomus 

l.eh.in.in Kaiuh.ll M.iii, 

Y W ( A KippiPhi Bi iwniM), A^iiculluiil I c momics ( lub \t,M Oiiixsi lni\.i H\ (L; ^ W C. A, Sigma Ni 



\1 1 Kin 1 I IPPI R.S(>\ 

\y.<uullu-al \.l,n:,u^l> 



tui il As 



&^^^ 



I'ai/c 257 



Seniors 









KARl, W. ERNST 


CLIFFORD C. EUSTACE 


T. MARION EVANS 




G. LEE FARNSWORTH 


EleclTical Engmeermg 


Agronomy 


Physical Educali 


on 


[nd. Chem,slry 


Topeka 


Wakefield 




Gove 


Wichita 


Cadet Major, R. O. T. C. (4) ; A. 1. E. E. 


Farm House. Alpha Zeta, Scabbard 
and Blade, Gamma Sigma Delta, Rifle 
Team (4); Freshmen Commission, Y. 
M. C. A., Klod and Kerne! Klub, 
Franklin, Advanced Course R. O. T. C. 
Wrestling (2, 3) ; Agricultural Assn. 


Sigma Nu, Football (2, 3, 4); Baseball 
(2, 3, 4;; Junior class president. Scab- 
bard and Blade, K Fraternitv, Captain 
R. O. T. C. (4). 


American Chemical Society Kansas 
State Chemical Club. 


EVERETT E. FAUCHIER 


EDWARD J. FISHER 


JANICE I.FISHER 




JOSEPHINE FISK JELINEK 


Commerce 


Chemical Bngmeering 


Public School Mv 




General Science 


Osage City 


Leavenworth 




Beverlv 


Manhattan 


Acacia, Alpha Kappa Psi, Band (1); 
Varsity Debate (4) ; Webster; President 
Freshmen Mens Panhellenic (1) . 


American Chemical Society, C:hemistry 
Club. 


Eurodelphian Glee Club 
■•Martha", The Mikado, 
mian Girl. 


(1. 2, 3, 4); 
The Bohe- 


Phi Omega Pi, Swimming (1): Volley 
Ball (I) ; Cosmopolitan Club Glee Club 
(L 3); Y W C. A. Royal Purple staff 
(3); Campus Chest (3). 


CE.RALDINE G. I'OLEY 


RFX L. l-OSSNKil IT 


MILDRED FOX 




MAURICE B. FRANKLIN 


Ciru-ral Science 


Cirit lingineering 


Home Economic 


-.5 


Electrical Engineering 


(_)rono(.|ue 


Ottawa 




Wichiia 


Topeka 


PhiOmcKa P;. Phi Alpha Mu, President 
(4j; Browning, l-nchiladas Y. W. C. A 


A. S. C. E. 


Chi Omega. 




Beta Pi Epsilon. Y. M. C. A. C:abinet 
(3 4); Hamilton. 



Page iB8 



Seniors 







RALPH W. FREEMAN AMELIA M. EROHN 

Flour Mill Engineering Home Economics 

Kirwin White City 

Delta Nu Omega, Sigma Tau, Mortar Home Economics Assn., Ereshman „ 

and Ball, Band (1. 2, 3, 4); Athenian. Commission, Y. W C. A. i\ , 2. 3, 4). p^j Kappa Tau, Alpha Zeta, Purple 

Masque, Agricultural Economics Club, 
Agricultural Assn., Ag Fair, Ag Barn- 
warmer. 



KENNETH M. GAPEN 

Agricultural Admini.stralion 
Journalism 

Ulysses 



./ 









^'^ ^r. 



ORVILLEH. GATES 

Mechanical Engincc 



Beta Pi Epsilon. 



MYRTLE GOHLKE 

Home Econo, 



T. HENRY GILE 

Animal Husbandry 

Scandia 
Phi Lambda Iheta Scarab, K Frat- 
ernity, Block and Bridle, Cross Country 
(2. 3, 4); Track (3); Meat Products 
Judging Team. 



RUri I GORDON 

llamesE 



FLORENCE A. GLEEN 
General Science 



Newman Club. 



josEi'i 1 1 1 c;rffne 

Af^ruullurat Admuu 

Alpha •l..in.ni,i [Rl„.. N.,, 

Team, \ 1., I 'ill M, \.]'. 
C:onUs( 1 ;i, Kl,„l ,,i„l b 
Agriculm,;,! .\ssn , N. ivl., 
Collcguilc 4 1 I (:1l.I\ I lo,' 



CHARLES G. GATES 

Civil Engineering 

Mortar and Ball, A, S. C. E. 



LAVC^NE GOHEEN 

General Science 

Oak Hill 
Then, P,. h.nian, ^•. W, C. ,\., Big 

Sisicr {2, i. 4). Chorus (1). 



MARGARFr H. CREEP 
Ih-nw Economics 

Longford 

Agricul- Alpha \i IXIia.Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar 
ludgmg l^oarj. Omicron Nu. Prix, Class Treas- 
.ludging urcr ( !) ; W . A A., Browning, Y. \V. C. 
cl Klub, A,, Ircasurer U). 

I<^I^T.!K 



Bc\c, 



Page 159 



Seniors 





ROY O. CREEP 


RUDOLPH r. CREEP 


CLOYDE L. GUINN 


EVAM. GUTHRIE 


General Science 


Ind. Chemistry 


Veterinary Medicine 


Home Economics 


Longford 


Longford 


El Dorado 


Woodston 


Alpha Sigma Psi, Scabbard and Blade. 


Phi Kappa Phi, Scabbard and Blade. 


Lambda Chi Alpha, Scabbard and 


Omicron Nu. Y. W. C A.. Eurodel- 


Athenian. Sophomore Honors, Kansas 
Academy of Science. A. A. A. S., Cap- 


American Chemical Society, Chemical 


Blade. 


phian. Home Economics Assn., Kansas 
Wesleyan University (1, 2); Zetaga- 
thian Literary Society, English Coffee 


Club. 




tain and Regimental Adjutant. R. O. 






T. C. (4). 






Club. 


CHESTER W. HAAS 


EDWIN O. HABIGER 


MINNIE R. HAHN 


K. M. HALL, 


Commerce 


Agricultural Administralion 


Home Econonucs 


Agncullurul Admini.\lra/ion 


Winfield 


Bushton 


Inman 


Agra 


Acacia, Freshmen's Panhellenic. Pax. 


Phi Kappa, Scarab, President (4); 
Football (1); Pax, Manager Ag Barn- 
warmer (4); Agricultural Economics, 




Acacia, Agnruliural Economics Club. 










Club, Agricultural Assn., Senior Men's 








Panhellenic, Secretary-Treasurer (4); 








Campus Chest (4): Athenian (1), New- 








man Club. 






CATHERINE M. HALSTEAD 








Ind. Journalism 


LEWIS G. 1 1AM I ETON 


J UNI ETA L. HARBES 


KA 11 lARlNI- F. I lARDlNG 


Manhattan 


Veterinary Medicine 


Home Economics 


Public School Music 


Alpha Delta Pi, Theta Sigma Phi, IVc- 
sident (4); Class Hockey (1, 2): C:iass 


South Haven 


Manhattan 


Manhattan 


Lambda Chi Alpha, Scabbard and 


Pi Kappa Delta, Secretary-Treasurer 


Alpha Xi Delta, Theta Pi. President 


Historian (3); Enchiladas, Mortar 


Blade. 


(3, 4); Omicron Nu, President: Debate 


(4) ; Y. W. C A., Girl's Glee Club (2, 3 


Board, Collegian Board, Cxjllegian Staff, 




(1. 2 3); Kappa Phi, Browning, Debate 
Scholarship (3); May Fete (1); Y. W. 


4): The Mikado (2); The Bohemian 


As'iistant liditor (4); Aggie Pop (3); 




Girl (3)- The Sorcerer (4). 


Brown Bull, Frivol. Royal Purple Staff 
(4). 




C. A., Home Economics Assn. 





Page £60 



Seniors 




t^km 




P^ I^P 




FLORENCE L. HAROLD 
Home Economics 

Dresden 
Omicron Nu, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa 
Beta, Y. W. C. A , Home Economics 
Assn. 



LAURA HART 

l\,bl,c,SJ,ool Music 

Overhrool 
Pi Heta Phi, Prix, W. A. A , Hockey (2) 
Basketball (1, 2); Volley Ball (f, 2) 
Secretary Class (1); Glee Club, Purple 
Pepsters, Red Cap, Y. W. C. A., Bif 
Sister Captain (3); Enchiladas, Sec 
retary-Trea surer Senior Women's Pan 
hellenic (3); Theodoric Council (2). 



■Uin I II'DIRI lORSI 
McJuinu.d luu-i 



FAYE HARRIS 

Ajyplied Arts 



R. LYNN HARTMAN 
CiVil Engmcci 



m ^x/j 



THEODORE G. HARRIS 

AgricuUurc 

El Paso. Tex. 
New Mexico Agricultural College, Glee 
C'lub. Horticulture Club, Agricultural 
Assn., Y. M. C. A., Advanced Course 
R O. T. C, Poultry Club, Agricultural 
Club 







hid-i 



x: 



LIAR'S 

Asrono, 



RODNEY D. HARRISON 

Commerce 

Burden 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. Captain R. O. T. C. 
(4); Hamilton. Vice-Prcsidenc ('U 
Chairman Board of Directors. Freshman 
Commission, Y. M. C. A. C'abinct ('. 
4); Chairman Y. M C. A. Retreat 
Committee. 



R(^B1-Rr R. HECKERr 
l-le.truai Eminee^ 



I loisinston 
I. Sigma lau. Debate 
2); Glee Club (I, 2). 



ii;i,i;n a. i iiaii-i hi i 

/,.,/ Jounud, 



Phi, Secrelaiv (4), M..rl;ii Bonid. 
sident: Collegian beaUne IJih.r. 
Collegian b.d.lor (■)); Culkgian Bn 



Ida c:hi 

Agriculi 
.1 Klub. 



•:Sil U \l I II KMAN 



GI.e Club, > W ( : A 
Urnnlion.il ( ,i,.up Cha 



lege !T,":'V; I'Jiiversav'ol k' 

a. l !•;, i;. 



K \ \ I 111 ^ \Rn 

M.iiih.iti.ii 
Cmcg.i Pi. Ihel.i Pi. Big SiMer i4l 



■> . w. c:. A. 



I'agc 261 



Seniors 





CHARLES F. HIRSCH 

Commerce 



Omega Tau Eps 



rl. C. HOFFMAN 

General Sci. 



RUSSEL W. HOFSESS 
Cnil Engineer 



ANITA MAE HOLLAND 
Home Economics 

Harper 
BetaPhifAlpha.W. A.A , SwimminR(2, 
3); Y. W. C. A., Big Sister Captain, 



Home 1 



ics As 



ERWIN D. HOLLINGSWORTH 
Architectural Engineering 

Salina 
f^i Kappa Alpha, Scarab. Varsity Tennis 
(3); Beauvais. Tobasco, Pax. College 
Band (1,2); Orchestra (3); Gargoyle 
C:iub, Vice-President (2) ; President (3) ; 
Kansas State Engineer .staff. Engin- 
eering Assn. 



JOHNSON A. HOLMES 

Ind. Journalism 

Manhattan 
Sigma Delta Chi, Ourll Club. 



MYRTLE E. HORNE W. HARRIS HOUSTON 
Home Economics Agriculture 

Alma I^otwin 
Omicron Nu, Ionian, ^'. W. C. A. Farm Llouse, Swimming (3); Track (I, 
Cabinet (3); Lambda I'au Kappa, 2) : Frcshnu-n Men's Panhcllcnic. Agri- 
Home Economics Assn., President. Van cultural Assn , Kind ani.1 Kernel Klub. 
Zile Hall. 



IDA I lOWARD 

Home Ec 



MLIRII-L I lOWARD 
., General Science 

^ Oberlin 

Garnet t ph, Aiph^ tvl^^ y. W. C. A., Cabinet 

omics Assn , (2, 3); Freshmen Commission, Kapiia 

Plii, Collegiate 4-H Club. 



PAUL I lOWARD 

/n,/ lownaUsi 

Delia lau Delia. 



Mount 1 lope 



AILEFN HULL 

AhhUcd An 



Kappa Delia, Cilcc Club (3, 4); C^osmo 
polilan Club (4); Y.W.C. A. (4L 



mmmm^mm^^^^^mM^^mm^m^^^^M^^. 



I'ayc 262 



Seniors 









^ 



KATHLRHN' V. HLiLIMEU J. WARD FNGRAHAM MARY JANE ISBELL 

Home Economics Electrical Engineering Home Economics 

Dodge City Manhattan Bcnninstc 

Chi Omega, Enchiladas, Aggie Orphcum Sigma (-"hi Sigma. Mortar and Ball. Glee C,luh {^, 4): The Bohemian Gii 



(3). 



Park College (I, 2) 



GLENN C. ISAAC 

.■\-;ruulture 

Elsmore 
Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Zeta, Klod 
and Kernel l<luh, Wesley Foundation, 
Agricultural Assn.. Hamilton. 



RALIMJ W.JACKSON 

Velerinary Medicine 
Denv 
Omega lau E.psilon 



S. K.JACKSON 

CivU Engineering 



Sigma Alpha Epsilr 



VERNON E JEFFERIES 

Electrical Engineering 



GEORGE J ELI NEK 

General Science 

EllsNvorth 
Alpha Rho Chi. Scabbard and Blade. 
Basketball (I, 2); Cosmopolitan Club, 
r S. L , Kans;is Aeadcniy of Science. 



l^RNESr b. Jl'NlSl A ilOWXRHJ )OBl 

General .Science ( il I n 

C.ikKvell 

Alpha lau Ome<ia. Scarab, Scabbard Sigm 1 1 ui \ S ( 

;ind Blade, I'Ecsidcnt (4) 1 i inl 



W 1 |( >\\ \Rn jOBl ING 
inl ( h ,UM ' 



M \K> 1 lOBl INt. 

/',/./.. .S\;,.v/ ,\/i.,Mc 

Caklwel 
\lu 1 hi I I lion. Gni- Glee Club 



41 ^ M ( 
\»gic Kmghts 



Page iiOS 



Seniors 



if 








#*« 



iL4 




MARGARET VERNEAL JOHNSON 
Home Economics 

Axtell 
Hockey (1); Kappa Phi. Alpha Beta, 
Home Economics Assn. 



PAULINE KEGEREIS 
Home Economi 



JOHN H KERSHAW 

Eleclrical. Engineer, n^ 

Garrison 
QjlIeKC Chorus (\. 2); Glee f.luh (2); 
A. I.E. E.Rine Team (4), Eirst UcuC, 
R O. T, C. (4)., 



ESTHER M.JONES 

General Science 



Freshman Phi Alpha Mu Scholarship 
Cosmopolitan Club, Ionian. 



E. V/ILLIS KELLEY 

Conime rce 

Kansas Ci' 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



SOLON 1. KIMBALL 

InJ.JournaUsm 

Manhattan 
Beta Theta Pi, Pi Kappa Delta, Sigma 

Delta Cni, President (4): Class prcsi- 



<\M, 



J.HAROLD KARR 

Electrical Engineering 

Troy 
Phi Si,£;ma Kappa, Phi Mu Alpha, 
Sifima Tau, A, I.E. E., Vice-President 
(3); Band (1, 2, 3. 4). 

CAROL SANFORD KELLY 
General Science 

Belleville 
N-Iurtar Board, Apple Judsing Team. 
1 lurticuliurc Club, Kappa Beta. 



WAYNE KIMES 

Eleclrical Engineering 

Dodge City 
Sigma Phi Sigma, A, I. E E., Advanced 
Course, R. O. T. C, Mortar and Ball. 



I'll. 



JOSEPHINE D. KEEF 

Ind. Journalism 

Glen Elder 
Delta Delta Delta, Enchiladas. Ag 
Orpheum. 



ANNIE M. KERR 

Home Economics 

Manhattan 
Mortar Board, Lambda Tau Kappa. 
President (3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4); 
Intersoeiety Council. Ionian, President 
(4). 



MILI-ORDJ. KINDIG 

Agricultural Administration 

Olathe 
Acacia. Scabbard and Blade, Scarab. 
J'a.x. T. S. L., President Senior Men's 
Panhellenie. Pi Epsilon Pi, Agricultural 
I-:eonomies Club. 



Manager I heodonc Pariv (2. t, 4); ^. 
M. C A., Cabinet (2); Senior invita- 
tions committee chairman (4); First 
Lieut. R. O. T. C. (4); Circulation 
Manager Collegian (4). 



Seniors 




^4co 






LOREN R, KIRKWOOD GEORGE H, KOEL,LING 

EU'clrical Engineering Ind. Chemistry 

Manhattan Talmage 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Mortar and Ball, Delta Sisma Phi, Scarab, Band (1, 2, 

A. I. E. E., Webster, First Lieut., R. 3); Chemical Club (3, 4). 
O. T. C. (4). 



CLEMONS M. KOPF LOUIS J. KOVAR 

Electrical Engineering Agricultural Engineering 

Beverly Rossvillc 

Sifsma Phi Sigma. Mortar and Ball, Baseball (2) : Wrestling (2) : Glee Club 

Ride Team (2, 3, 4); Track (3, 4); A. (l,2);Band (1.2);Rifle Team (2) ; Web- 

I. E. E., Advanced Course, R O. T. C. stcr. President (4) ; Intersocicty debate. 

Inter-society plays, Vlanhattan Theatre. 



JOSEPH A KUFFLER 

Cud Engineering 



Phi Kappa. A. S C:. E, Secretary (4). 



KENNETH J. LATIMER 

Chemical Engineering 

Delta Sigma Phi, K 1 "imui nil v, 
Wrestling (3, 4); Aihcnian. Ei 
Open House. 



.imboldt 
Varsity 



KUTl I L. I AI'IIMORE 

I livnc Economics 

Wcsl 111, 



EITiANOR LALIGHEAD 
Home Economics 

Dodge City 
Chi Omega. F.nchiladas.".'\g "Orphcum 



0) 



(3); Aggie Pop (-i). 



VERNA LAIZKE 
Home !■: 



EUGENE P. LAWRENCE l^'^^^l^ ''^ACi I ELK^ENE M. LEAR^ 

Physical Education General Science Uncutturc 

Eads, Colo. BirdCus', lawr 

Sigma Phi Sigma, ,\dvanccd Course, luiicJcliMiian, Kai^pa I'hi, ^ . W. C. A. Poulirv ludmng Team. Agrlculi 

R. (.J. 1. C:. Su.dcnt. Agricultural Assn., Poi 

t:iub. Captain, R.O.r.C. (4). 



I'df/c ::'! 



Seniors 









THOMAS J. LEASURE 

Veterinary Medicine 

Solomon 
Acacia, Phi Kappa Phi, Junior Ameri- 
can Veterinary Medical Assn. 


GRETA V. LEECE 

Home Economics 

Formoso 
Kappa Phi, Y. W C, A., Big Sister. 


EVELYN MAE LINDSEY 
Home Economics 

Winchester 
Basketball (1, 2. 3); Hockey (2): Base- 
ball (1.2, 3,4); W. A. A., Home Econo- 
mics Assn., Eurodelphian, Y. W. C. A.. 
Kappa Phi. 


CLABERN O LITTLE 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sedgwick 
Delta Nu Omega, Phi Kappa Phi, A. S. 
M. E., Band (1, 2, 3, 4,) Rifle Team (2. 
3, 4) ; Franklin, Advanced Course R. O. 


A. B. LITVIEN 

Civil Engineering 

Kansas City, Kans 
A. S. C E. 


GENEVIEVE LONG 

Home Economics 

Haviland 
Phi Omega Pi, Eurodelphian, Secretary 
(3); Vice-President (4); Enchiladas, 
Senior Women's Panhellenic, Home 
Economics, Meat Judging Team (3); 
Kappa Phi (1. 2, 3). 


L. LORAINE LOR TSCHER 
Home Economics 

Fairview 
Sigma Alpha, Iota, Omicron Nu, Home 
Economics Assn., Treasurer ^Van Zile 
Hall (4): Y. W. C. A., Washburn 
College (1). 


BERNICE E. LOYD 

General Science 

Hiawatha 
Phi Alpha Mu, Eurodelphian, Y. W. 
C. A. 


VERNA M. LOYD 

Home Economics 

Hiawatha 
Euroclclphian. Y. W. C. A., h!ome Eco- 
nomics Assn. 


DALi; H i.oir 

C,r,7 Engineering 

Minneapolis 
Ciolf (4); A. S. C:. E. 


RILLAND E. LUNB[-.CK 
/„,/. Journalism 

Manhattan 
Kappa Delta, Girl's Ride Team, (4): 
Senior Vollcv Ball Team, W. A, A , 
M.mhattan Iheatre, Glee Club, (1). 


RUri 1 BERYL McCAMMON 
Home Economics 

Norton 
Phi Omega Pi, Mortar Board, Phi 
Alpha Mu, Ionian, Cosmopolitan Club. 






Page 206 





Seniors 





CAROLINE McCARTY 

Home Economics 

Kansas City, Kan. 
Newman Club, Y. W. C. A , Home 
Economics Assn., Kansas City Junior 
College (1). 



ELINOR M. McCAUL 
Home Econon 



THELMA F. McCLURE 
Home Economics 

Hutchinson 
Omicron Nu, Eurodelphian, Home 
Economics Assn., Y. W. C. A. 



ROBERT H. McCOLLUM 
Physical Education 

El Dorado 
Sigma Nu, Phi Delta Kappa. Phi 
Epsilon Kappa, "K" Fraternity, I-oot- 
ball (1). Basketball (1): Baseball (\.2. 
3, 4); Intramural Letterman 0) ■ 



C. PORTER McKINNIE 

Animal Husbandry 

Glen Elder 
Alpha Sigma Psi, Alpha Zeta, Censor 
(4); Block and Bridle, President (4); 
Agricultural Assn., Y. M. C. A. Cab- 
inet, Ag I-air Staff (?, 4); Hamilton, 
Agricultural Student staff. 



DAN McLACHLAN 

Ind. Chemistry 

Pleasanton 
Phi Lambda Theta, Wrestling (3); 
Athenian, Orator (4) ; Advanced Course, 
R. O. T. C, Chemistry Club, 



MARGARET K4c 
Ind. J 



KINNEY 

ournalism 

Great Bend 
Mortar Board, Prix. 
(1), Vice-President (3); 



I lAROLD I. M 



Alpha Xi Dclt 
Class Historian 

Senior Women's Panhcllcnic, Vi 
Prcsitlent (2): President (3); Freshmen 
Women's Panhcllcnic, Vice-President 
(M: Campus Chcsi (?); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (?. 4); M.uiagcr Aggie Pop (3, 
4); Enchiladas, R„val Purple stalT (3, 
4) ; Student Council. Secretary (4). 



HOWARD O. McMANIS 

.\Kr:cutturat Engmeenn<i 

Welling 
I lamilton, A. S. A. V... Y. M. C, A. 



McMULl.E.N 
M^Mied Art 



Phi, ^■. \V. C. A. 



I l\K(M.DG. MANGF.LSDROF 
Electrical Enxmeenn-. 

Alchinson 
Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Tau, Scabbard 
,ind Blade, Mortar and Ball, Purple 
Masque President Ci) : Scarab, Pro- 
..luclion Manager Manhadan Iheaue 
(I): Business M;nia>;cr (-i) : .\ 1. hi \i 



B. M.\CA' 
General S. 



s (.;icc c:iub. C 



Seniors 







&. ^ <:i % 



% 
lu 




MERLE L. MAGAW 

Agronomy 

Concordia 
Acacia. Klod and Kernel Klub (3, 4); 
Acricultural Assn. (3, 4); Honor Roll 
(3); Dairy Products Judging Team (4). 



HELEN L. MAGEE 

Physical Educatic 



W II I A LOIS MANTZ 

I lomc Economics 

Thcta Epsilon, Y. W, C. A. 



ARNOLD A. MAST 

Agriculture 

Coldwatcr Abilene 

Farm I louse. Alpha Zeta, l^ax, Scarab, 
Klod and Kernel Klub, Agricultural 
Assn., Senior Men's Panhellenic. 



MARJORIE MANSHARDT 
InJ. Journalism 

Lconardville 
Chi Omega, Enchiladas. 



CLARA W. MAll lER 

Home Economics 

Centralis 
Home Economics Assn., Y. W. C. A. 
Glee Club (1). 



CHARLES MANTZ 

Agricultural Adn 



Wrestling (3, 4); Hamilton, Agricult- 
ural Economics Club, Agricultural 



RICHARD B. MATHER 
Horlicullwe 

Burdett 
Athenian, .Apple Judging "I cam (4). 



c. i-i:rn maxi:y 

I lomc Economi 



f:iass I listorian (4); Kappa Phi 
Browning, I lomc lic<;nomcis Assn. 



M. l'rances maxwell 

Commerce 

Manhattan 
AliMia Thcta Chi, Ionian, Thcta Epsi- 
lon, Y. W. C. A,, Intcrsocicly Debate 
(2) ; Intcrsociety Oiuncil, GlccC.lub (3). 



MAXWl-LL 
Home Economics 

Manhalti 
lu, 1 lomc Economics Assn., 



PAUL A. MEARS 

Agricultural Adminstralion 

Bcloit 
B. Y. P. U., President (3); Hamilton, 
President (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
President (4) ; Delegate to 5. V. M., 
Detroit (2); Estes Park (3); Inter- 
society Council (3); Treasurer (4); 
Agricultural Economics Club (3, 4). 



Seniors 




^ 









QhAfA 






THOMAS N. MERONEY 
Agncullurc 



RALPH F, MELVILLE GLEN E. MEREDITH 

Commerce Archilectural Engineering 

Municc Junction City CarJcn C 

Hamilton. Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, Band LambJj Chi Alpha, Sigma Tau. Foot- Webster, Y. M. C. A , Dairy Club. 

(1. 2, 3, 4). hall (I 2); Track (2) 



ALFRED M. MEYERS 
Civil Engirwering 



Sigma Kappa, Football (.4); A. S. 



CLARA C;, MILLER 

Home Economics 



M. EDGAR MILLER 

Ciiil Engineering 



ROBERT W. MILLER 
Mechanuol Engn 



W. A. A. (I, 2, 3); Swimming (3); Mortar and Ball Treasurer (3); A. 

Kappa Bjia. S. C-. E., Athenian, Treasurer (4); Go- 

to-CoIIege Team (2); Band (I); First 
Lieut, and Adjutant of First Battalion, 
R. O. T. C. (4). 



AL'SiiN nk^rc;an 

Cnd E.nginee, 



Sijiina lau. Phi Mu Alpha. A S C. E 
Band (1.2. !. 4L Washburn C^ollego, 



CI lARLF.S F.. MORG.^N 
Cenerol .Science 



arli'l: murphf.^' 

Home Ecoi 



lOM.VS.L MLXI o\\ 

\'elciiiui,y Med, 



CI I ANNMNc; (,; mm-;rs 

In.l Chemistry 



\ M. c:. A.c 



\nuiu.in \> 



Seniors 













WINIFRED A. N'ACHTRIEB 


BORDEN D NEIMAN 


WM. M NEWMAN 


R.T.NICHOLS, JR. 


Home Economics 


Electrical Engineering 


Agricultural Administration 


Commerce 


Atchison 


Manhattan 


Centralia 


Manhattan 


Kappa Delta, Omicron Nu, Rifle Team 
(3. 4); Hardin College (1,2). 


A. I. E. E. 


Agricultural Economics Club, Hamil- 
ton, Collegiate 4-H Club, Chairman 
4-H Club Radio Program. Whoo's 
Whoot, 4-H Club Annual staff. 


Sigma Nu, Captain, R. O. T. C. (4). 


(iORDON C:. NONKEN 


CLARENCE E. NU 1 lER 


LOISM.CMM-RIIELMAN 


RAYMOND W. OHARA 


Electrical Engineering 


Animal Husbar^dry 


Home Economics 


Agriculture 


Manhattan 


Falls City, Neb. 


Barnes 


Blue Mound 


Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Tau. Y. M. C 
A. Cabinet (2. 3) : President (4) ; Fresh- 
man CommisMMH, Vice President, En- 
BineerinK As-,n '4i \'. .president A. 
1. E E. (4j . '-N - 1 \' iriL, '4. ; Athenian, 
F'reshmen 1 l..n..i , S, ., L, „,i.,re Honors, 
Junior Schc)la->iic I'nje, ( .;itnpus Chest. 


Sigma Phi Epsilon, Block and Bridle, 
Treasurer (4); Football (2, 3, 4); Track 
(3, 4); Agricultural Association, Sec- 
retary (3); Student Council (4); "K" 
Fraternity, Campus Chest (4); Pax, 
Scarab. 


Kappa Phi, Y. W. C. A., Home Eco- 
nomics Assn. 


Alpha Zcta. Phi Kappa Phi, Junior 
Livestock Judging Team, Senior Live- 
stock Judging Icam. Poultry Judging 
Team, Athenian, Baby Chick and Egg 
Show, Secretary; Ag Fair Board. 


BEAIRIC:!-. OLIPI IAN r 


LLJELLA <)Ni:iLL 


ARIHIIR E. OWEN 


LAUREL J. OWSLEY 


Home Economics 


I lome Economics 


Electrical Engineering 


Electrical Engineering 


1 lutchinson 


Winchester 


Wichita 


Manhattan 


Home Flconomics Assn , LinJenwood 
ColieBC (1, 2). 


Phi Omega Pi, Browning, Y. W. C. A. 


Alpha Beta, A. I. E. I-:. 


Delta Nu Omega, Kansas State En- 
gineer, A. I. E. E.. Y. M C. A., Inter- 
society Oratory, Franklin, Intersociety 
Debate, Intersociety Council, Band (1, 

2, 3). 





Page £70 



Senior ^ 







LEONE PACEY 

General Science 

Manhattan 
Alpha Xi Delta, Hockey (1. 2, 3) : Class 
Historian (2); Y. W. C A . W \ A , 
Council (2. 3, 4); Purple I'. |. I .,- i .\ !) 
A. C. A. C. W. Convcnih.n I), I, :mi,, 
Columbus, Ohio (3); W \ \ s,,,,,. 
Convention (2) ; Browning. I'm\, Iiiici- 
society Council (3, 4). 



HEEEN V. PARCELS 

Home Bconom ;'. 



WILLIAM H. PAINTER 
General Science 

Meade 
Alpha Gamma Rho. Crops Judging 
Team (3) ; Webster. President (3) ; Klod 
and Kernel Klub, Treasurer (3). 

LeROY C PASLA>' 

Electrical Engineering 

Manhattan 



LENORA PAISLEY 

General Science 



lARRI' A, PALILSEN 
Agricul!ur„l AJnu 



Alpha Theta C: 
nomics Assn. 



Hiawatha 
lomc Eco- 



lenie. Pi Ip il, 
Barn«.,Mn, , 
Man^i..;. - . • I . 

and B\idle, h 
stock Judging 
Panhcllcnic. 

VERNON S. PI 
Agnculli 



lion 
Stafford 
un Men s Panhel- 
^ M <■ \ Ag 

inl M,.n,i!;ii l ? T; 
. \!;iku!uu,ll \\- 



LESLIEE. PARAMORE 
Electrical Engineer 



RAI' C PAULSON 

Electrical Engineer 



Delta 
(2); "I". 



Delta Sigma Phi. Scarab, Pa 
Men's Ponhellenic, Vice-Presi^ 
A S A. E., Treasurer (3). 



\I,LS>,IK, I'l 

sKlenl ill, 
\1 t \ . 
M.mh.iu.m 
.11 1 Winner 
l\hau-(21; 
u Manu.ger 



n Dn 



Seniors 







kii.4^^k 



FRANCES L. PICKENS 

Home Economics 

Lake City 
Home Economics Assn., Y. W. C. A,, 
Kappa Beta. 



BRUCE R. PRENTICE 

hli'Clncul Engineering 

Clay Center 
resident (4j ; Sigma 



Goddard 
iral Assn., 



I^hi Ml 
lau, S. 
(>ch<. 1 
A . S,,| 
cogniii, 



A. 1. E. E. (3, 4) 
l'..,nd (1.4); Y. M. C. 
I. iiic.rs, Freshman Re- 
I au, junior Recogni- 
Engineering Depart- 



ELSli: !•:. RANID 

Inslitutumal I- 



Alpha Ihela C;hi, 
ncjmies Assn , Y. 
Chairman. 



Wamego 
in. Home l-co- 
('.. A., Social 



LEONARD M. PIKE 

Agricullure 



Lambda Chi Alpha. Agr 
Y. M. C. A. 



GALEN S. QUANTIC 
Agricultural AJmi 



Alpha Gamma Rho. Agricultural Ec 
nomics("lub. Agricultural Assn., Hon 
Roll. 



MARY E. RANKIN 

Home Economics 

Kansas Cii y, Kans 
Delta Zela. Y. W. C. A . I lome [{cono 
mics Assn.. 1-rivol, Kansas Cjiy Junio 
College {I. 2). 



WALTER P. POWERS 

Agricultural Administration 

Netawaka 
Farm House, Alpha Zeta Phi Delta 
Kappa. Gamma Sigma Delta, Glee Club 
(2) ; Agricultural Economics Club. Agri- 
cultural Assn., Treasurer (4); Dairy 
Cattle Judging Team (4) ; Meats Judg- 
ing Team (4). 



G. LeROY QUIGLEY 

Electrical Engineering 

Halstead 
Nu Omega, Athenian, A. I.E. E 



JAMES W. PRATT 

Commerce 

Manhattan 
Sigma Nu, Purple Masque, Scabbard 
and Blade, Alpha Kappa Psi. Pi Epsilon 
Pi. Beauvais. Manager ,Ag (irphium, 
Senior Men's Panhellenii I'u uKiii (ii; 
Student. Instructor. I ")i i mi i mk m of 
Public Speaking, T. S. I 1 nui ( ol.. 
R. O. T. C. (4);Treasuicr (..minus 
Chest (3); Y. M. C. A. Governing 
Board. Cabinet; Debate (3); Freshmen 
Men's Panhellenic. "Is Zat So". "The 
Poor Nut", "Tommy", "The Show 
Off". "One of the Family". "The 
Queen's Husband", "Holiday", "Ro- 



Deit 

Vice-President Wesley Foundation (4) ; 
Y. M. C. A , Go-to-College team (3). 



T.mi;n 1 1. raihblin 



B. E. RAMSEY 

Cvil Engine 



Digh 



Manhatii 
^■. W. C. A. 



MAR^ BELL Rl- AD 

Phv.sual Elucation 

Manhattan 
Delta Delta IXIta, Prix. Women's "K" 
l-raternity. W, A. A. Council (3. 4); 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet {2, 3,4); Big Sister 
Chairman (3); May Fete (I, 4); Aggie 
Pop (I, 3, 4); Frivol (1. 2); Orchesis, 
Red Cross Life Saving Examiner 



Page S7S 



m&. 



^^^1 



Seniors 




""ft 



LAWRENCE V. RECTOR ALZINA REED 

Commerce General Science 

Manhattan Waktficid 

Delta Tau Delta, Mortar and Ball, Browning, "l'. W. C. A, Kappa l^hi. 

Intramural Letterman (2); A. I. E. E , 
Advanced Course, R. O. T. C, Y. M. 
C. A., Freshman Commission. 



LOUIS P. REITZ JOHN S RHODES 

Agricidhire Eleclncal Engineering 

PjlIU- I'lainc Tampa 

Farm I louse. Alpha Zti.i, 1 'h i Kappa Sigma Tau, Mortar and Ball, C'adcl 

Phi. Glee f:iuh (I) \.;m.uIiu..,1 \ssn,, Major, R O, T C . A. I F, I- . 

Klod and Kernel KInh \ i, , I'l, ident 

I?). Kansas Stale \-,m u,,,t s, udeni 

staff; editor, (4); Cram lud^inn Team 
(3). 



GRACE EDITHA REED LOUISE E REED 

Physical Education Home Economics 

Topeka I lolton 

Zeta Tau Alpha. Y, W C A . W A A , Omicron Nu, Phi Kappa Phi. Ionian, 

President (4) ; Stum M.m.nur M' W Corresponding Seeretarv (3) ; Critic (4) ; 

A. A. State Cmx.nih.n 1-1,1,-11, 1- W. C. A. (3, 4); Editor Omicron Nu 

Council (3, 4i I'uM'l' l',i'i,i (4); Orchestra (I, 2, 3. 4). 

Aggie Pop (3, 4). ( .i.npii t I., 1 ' V -li 

R, .1.111, in I l,,sU',s I !, lMii,.niM,;il ,\lan- 

.n;, I - i> \\,.ii„n K 1 ■,,!, inily (S, 

4) I |,„l , X 1 ', l! \,,M, x I',., II ,: 3 4): 

B.r.l .il,:,ll i; i, 4i, l',.,s, h.ill (2, 3); EARL C RICHARDSON 

I'-ack (2, i). /„j ;,„„,„,/, A„i 

ColTeyville 

Alpha Tau Omega. Sigma Delta Chi, 

Scabbard and Blade, Roval Purplc 

CLEMENT D RIC1I,\RDS(W StatT, Athletic Editor 0): Assistant 

^-;, „,,;;.■„,,„,,„ . Editor (4): Collegian Staff, .Assistant 

EUanuxl /,,.., ,:u, ;,n., ^^.^^^^^_ ^_^^ . p._.^^ , .^.^^ ,^ ^^ -,- j;, ^_,, . 

1 lugolon Winner Llniied Ad Writing Contest ^,31 ; 

;<■■ I'laiermiv. Broun Bull I'duor ^41. Manager Vox 



GF(M<c;F V. RICI lARDSON 
Elect, ualEngnurrnxg 



1 R RICI lARDSON 
Home luonomus 



RONALD C. Rll PI 

hul Jounud: 



WANDA 1 I Rll i:'\ 

Cencal .SV, 



^^^m^^^ 



Seniors 





% 
.^^/ 




MARY EILLEEN ROBERTS 
General Science 

Manhattan 
Phi Alpha Mu. Phi Kappa Phi, Y, W. 
C. A., Lambda Tau Kappa, Eurodel- 
phian 



THELMA G. ROBERTS 
General Science 

Manhattc 
Alpha Theta Chi. Eurodelphian 



MAE ROONEY 

Home Economics 



"hi Omega. 



FLORA H. ROSS 

Home Economics 

Amarillo, Texas 
Alpha Delta Pi. Omicron Nu. Hockey 
(3,4); Baseball (2, 3. 4) ; Volley Ball (2, 
3): Prix, W, A A,. Council, Purple 
Pepsters, Y. W. C, A., Big Sister 
Captain. 



FRANK H. ROT[4 

Eleclricul Engine 



A. I. E. E, (3, 4) ; Kansas State Engin- 
neer. Circulation Mgr. (4); Ass't. Circ. 
Mgr. (3). 



DOROTHY' IL RUCKER 

Home Economics 



Kappa Delta. 



NEVA E, RUSH 

Home Economics 

Severy 
Beta Phi Alpha, Y. W. C:. A., Home 
Economics Assn. Enchiladas. 



RA\' RUSSELL 

Mechanical Engineering 

Kansas City, Kans 
Delta lau Delta, Basketball (3. 4); 
Kansas ('ity Junior College. 



R0BI:K [ I I. RUSSI-LL 

Mechanical Engineer 

Manhattan 
Sigma Tau, Phi Mu Alpha, Webster, 
Treasurer (4); Intersociety Council (4); 
A. S. M. E. Glee Club (3, 4) , Go-to- 
Collcge Team. 



WILLIAM E. RUSSELL 
Ind. Journalism 

LaCrosse 
Phi Sigma Kappa, T. S. L., Pax, Scarab, 
Pi Epsilon Pi, Senior Men's Panhellenic. 



hi-:li-:n m. rus r 

Public School Music 

Manhattan 
Beta Phi Alpha, Glee Club (L 2, 3, 4); 
"Mikado". "The Bohemian Girl", "The 
Sorcerer". 



ALION H. RYON 

Electrical Engineering 

Chill icothe, Texas 
Blackshirts, Scabbard and Blade, Foot- 
ball (4, 5); JohnTarletonColU-.Tc M, 2); 
Texas A. & M. Collc(;i i ii X.lincini 
Third Battalion (4); oin, ,i I-;, mi\c 
Corps(5);A. LE.E.,Gk. i lul.,^ Iu,..il 
Club (4); Adv. Mgr. Rosal I'uipIl (4, 
5), Blackshirts President (5). 



m^^^mm^^mmm^^m^^^m^^^^m^m^^^^^^m 



Page X7i 



Seniors 







MINER R SALMON JACK SANDERS GLADYS M. SCHAFER MARGARET J. SCHATTENBURG 

Agriculture Electrical Engineering I nd. Journal ism Ind. Joiurnalixni 

Manhattan Independence Del Notre, Colo. Riley 

Farm House, Alpha Zeta, Athenian. Pi Kappa Alpha, Basketball (1, 2), Pi Kappa Delta, Dcbai e M, 4,) Fresh- 

Manhattan Theatre (2. 3), Gamma Baseball (1, 2), Scarab, A. I, E. E., man Honors, nd'.ni Si h^ . In ship (4) 

Sigma Delta. Kansas State Engineer Staff, Inde- Kappa Phi. ( ..il'm. i I'l l\.ir>s.is Siatc 

pendence Jr. College (1 , 2). Collegian Stall li.i .impir < hrsi (i) 

Sigma Delta (In .Si h, ,1.,, ship \\xarj, 
Colorado Agricultural ("cillege (2). 



GLADYS SCHME.DEMANN LORNA K SCI 1MID1,1:K EDWARD 11 SCI INI' ID1:R 

Public School Music Ind. Joumah.stn Elcclncal Engineering 

Manhattan Marysvillc Kansas Cii\, K; 

Alpha Xi Delta. Mu Phi Epsilon, Glee Alpha Xi Delta, Thcta Sigma Phi, Acacia, A 1 E E, Radio C:iub 

Club (1.2. 3), Orchestra (1 , 2. 3), Theta Enchiladas 
Pi, Orchesis, Prix. 



\i 1 sctireini-:r 

Honu Economics 

Ramona 
Ita Ida, l-Airolclphian. ^ W. C.A., 
nu- lo-nomics .\ssocuu ion. Mc- 
L-rson C.illcnc 1. 



S. ADELAIDE. SC( ) r I 

IViysual luliualion 

Manhattan 
Prix. Volley Ball (1, 2, 3, 4). Hockey 
(3, 4). Basketball (3.4). Baseball (3j. 



L. SCOTI 

Home /•:, 



R Li'si i:r sc 



HI n\\ II 111 \l \ SCI KM 

//,->!,■ l-\onom„s 



Orches 
Y. W 

Aggie 



Women's 'K' 

", A., W. A. A. 
"P(l. 3). 



f'ratcrnitv 

(4, 



Seniors 










FREDRICK H. SCHULTIS 

Agricultural Administralion 

Sylvan Grove 
Alpha Zeta, Phi Delta Kappa, Ham- 
ilton, Af»ricultural Economics Club, 
Secretary (4); Junior Stock Judging 
Team (3), Senior Stock Judging Team 
(4); Agricultural Student (4); Manager 
Aggie Dairy Judging Contest (3); 
Dairy Judging Team (3); Block and 
Bridle, Agricultural Association, (Jol- 
egiate 4-H Club. 

FRANCES D SHELDON 
General Scictxce 

Blue Rapids 



KI:RMIT J. SII,VF,RWOOD 
Ind. Journalism 

Ellssvorlh 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Delta Chi. 
liaskctbal! (1, 2, 3, 4); Tennis (1,2, 3. 
4); Chaplain (3, 4) ; Tobasco, Beauvais, 
Royal r^urple Staff ('3): Collegian Staff 
(4); "K" Fraicrnity, Assistant Business 
Manager Collegian (4). l-'.clitor Aggie- 
ville News. 



WILLIAM J. SCHULTIS 
Cc-ncra/ Science 

Svlvan Grove 
Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Hamiiion, Y. M. C. A., Cabinet, 
L. S. A (2. 3). 



enng 

Atchison 
EnKincc 



A1,LEN P. SHELLY 

Mechanical Eni 



H, D. SMILEY 

Veterinary Medicine 

Manhattan 
Scabbard and Blade, Quill Club, 
Gamma Sigma Delta, K. S. A. C. S, C, 
A. V. M. A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Captain 
R. O. T. C, Royal Purple Staff (4); 
'"I'he Queen's llusband," Advertising 
Manager K. S. A. C^. Baby Chick 
Shosv (3). 



VIRGINIA M. SCH WAGER 
Home Economics 

Manhat 
Y. W. C. A., L. S. A. (3, 4); Witt 
berg College (1 , 2). 



RALPH A. SIIENK 

G.-n.-ral Scier 



ELMER H. SMI TH 

Agricultural Bngi 



Webster, A. S. A. 



GERTRUDE SHEETZ 

Public School Music 

Admire 
Public School Music Course; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Mu Phi Epsilon, Mor- 
tar Board, Class Vice-President (4); 
Band (1. 2, 3, 4): Orchestra (2); Glee 
Club (2, 3, 4). 



HELEN MARIE SI lU^ LER 
Ind. Journalism 

Hutchinson 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Class Secretary 
(1). 



MAR II lA A. .SMI II I 

Physical Education 

Durham 
Alpha Ihcta Chi, Volleyball (1); Base- 
liall (I); Hockey Honorary Team (3); 
American Red C^ross Life Saving Corps 
(3); W. A. A., Kappa Phi, Purple 
Pepsters, Freshman Commission, Wo- 
men's "K " Fraternity. 



^^^^m 



Seniors 






1 





/ 








h^ 






X 



INEZ E. SNYDER DALE E. SI^RINGER HERBERT N. STAPLETON AREO L. STEELE 

General Seicncc Agricultural Engineering Agricultural Engineering Electrical Engineering 

Osborne Garrison Jewell Manhattan 

Phi Kappa I^hi, Phi Alpha Mu. A S. A E., Purple Masque (2, 3, 4); Acacia, Sigma Tau, Scabbard and Delia Nu Omega. Nlortar and Ball. 



The_Poor Nut"; "Sun up" 



IRWIN R. STENZEL 

Electrical Engineering I lElTlN S TEUAR f 

Marion General Science 

Delta Nu OmcRa. Sigma Tau, Phi Wineheslet 

v^I^J^-^a' ,^'^'^"'''"' /"■ \ ^■, ^- Y. W. C. A. Inlersocie.v L>haie (2); 

Y M. C A.. Ottawa University (1, 2). Brtjwning, President (4) ' 



ROSS A^ sr. jOl IN 

Viril Engineering MAIDENIC SlOl I'l' 

Morhind IViy.^inil luliu. 

Mortar and Ball, A. S. C. I-.. Viee- 
President, Second Lieutenant R. O. W. A, A, 

T. c:. 



Blade, Mortar and Ball, Steel Ring, .V I. E E , Lieutenant R. O. T. C. 

Hamilton, Y. M. C. A., Cabinet, Eranklin. 

Engineering Association. President, 

Engineering Student Council, President, 

A. S. A. E., President, Assistant Editor 

Kansas State Engineer. 



lAROLD C, STEVl-NS 
Agricultural Engiiu 



uiklin, A^ S. A. 



MARCilTUl II' M S I Ul l.hJ N 
General Science 

Ba:ine 
^•. W. C. A. (!, 4): 1-ranklin (!. 4). 



roc;i:r sri:\\ ar i 

A--riculture 

\ermillion 
l-arm I lou-c. Alpha Zela. Agricultural 
Association, Agricultural liconomie- 
Club, Poultry Judging Team (,>); .\,d 
Fair. Secretary-Treasurer (4). 



in\ W \l Kl 1< M \l\(l RS 

C.\/U7.l/ S.ICIWC 

Manh.ui 



Seniors 





WILLIAM J. SWFET 

Archileclural Engineering 

Wichita 
Mortar and Ball. Gargoyle Club. 
Athenian, Treasurer (2) ; Vice-President 
(3) ; President (4) ; Intersociety Council. 
Advanced Course R. O. T. C. First 
Lieutenant R. O. T. C. .Officers Reserve 
Corps. 



J. EDWARD TAYLOR 
Agriculture 

Manhattan 
Farm House. Klod and Kernal Klub. 
President (4) ; Agricultural Student 
Staff. Athenian, President Intersociety 
Debate (3,4). 



MERRILL M. TATLOR 
Agriculture 

Perry 
Farm House. Alpha Zeta. Scarab. 
Horticulture Club, Freshman Com- 
mission. Y. M. C. A., Apple Judging 
Team (4); Agricultural Association. 
Secretary (4) ; Agricultural Student 
Staff (3, 4). 



EDGAR A. TEMPLETON 

Agricultural Administration 

El Dorado 
Delta Tau Delta. College of Emporia 
(1): Agricultural Association (2, 3. 4); 
Agricultural Student Staff (3, 4); Pax. 
Y, M. C A 



J. ALLEN TERRELL 

Agriculture 

Syracuse 
1 Rho, Alpha Zeta. Pi 
DcK-itc n. 4); Junior 



Alpha Gamn 
Kappa Dell; 

Livc-i.,,I h 
Livc~i.„l lu 
AgrKuhur.il 

Blocl .,M I l'„ 



Z H. TESSENDORF 

Ciril Engineering 

Alpha Sigma Psi, Sigma I 
Ring, Y, M. C;. A., A, S, C 
Athenian. 



CLEO TETER 

Home Economics 

Onaga El Dorado 

;. Steel Alpha Xi Delta. W A. A. (1. 2. 3. 4); 

;, Pax. Purple Pepsters (3, 4): Y. W. C A . 

Home Economics Association. Kappa 

Beta. 



EUGENE W. THEISS 

Velerinary Medicine 

Hutchinson 
Baseball (1); Junior American Veter- 
inary Medical Association. 



1 lOWARD 
J-:ir 



I lUDIN 
,( Engmec 



CHARLi:S C. TODD 

Agncultunil Admi, 

Phi Lambda Thcia, Wt 
lural Economics C^lub 
Association. 



Auhur 
Agricu 



TOOMEY 

Electrical Engineering 

Ncodcsha 

.amhda Fheta. Scabbard and 

Mortar and Ball. A. L E^ E. 

in R. O. T. C, Freshman Com- 

n, l>eshman Honor Roll. 



W. LOWELL TRFASTER 
Ind Journalism 



I'agc 27S 



Seniors 





r^, ^? rj 





^ 



NELLIE F. TRECHSEL 
General Science 



LORENE R. UHLRIG LUCILLE UHLRIG 

General Science General Science 

Idana Belvue Bel\ 

Beta Phi Alpha, College of Emporia 
(1.2). 



MILDRED F. UNGEHEUER 
Home Ecorxomics 

Centcrvillc 
Kappa Phi, ^■. W. C. A. 



GEORGE R. VANDERPOOL 
Cii il Engineering 



Athenian, A S. C. E. 



ELSIE c:;. WALL 

Public School Mu.s 



VIRGINIA VAN HOOK FRANCES M. WAGAR 

Home Economics Physical Education 

Tnpcka I-I<irenec 

Kappa Delta, Enchiladas, W. A. A., pj Kappa Delia. \V. A. A , Women's 

Rifle Team (4); Baker University, "K " I- rii ,rnii \ loniin 

Aggie Pop (2, 3): Y. W. C. A., Home 
Economics Association, Vollev Ball (1) ; 
Baseball (1). 



DOROTHY- WAGNER 
AnHu:i An 

Topeka 
Delta Zcta, Y. W. C. A.; Senior 
Women's Panhellenic President (4) 
Freshmen Women's Panhellenic (1) 
Enchiladas, Ionian. I lomc Economic: 
.'Vssi^iation. 



I'nchiladas, . 
Aggie Orph.' 
"Young Woo. 



Cluh (2, 3) 
. W, C A. 
Mav L'cte 



FRF/rr R WALLERS II'DI 
Archileclure 

Manhi 
ma Nu, Gargoyle Cluh, 



I C. WAISON 

hul. Journalism 

Frankfort 

1 Sigma, Sigma Delta ('hi, Col- 
Staff (2); Assistant Editor (3): 

■ (4) : Editor Summer School 

lan (3): Collegian Board (3, 4); 

I Bull Staff (3): Treasurer Thco- 
I'ariy (4): Sigma Delta Chi 
rship Award, The Friars; Sopli- 
I lonors. 



W A 
Ho 



1 lomo Fcono 
^ . W. C A (,! 



'SON 
,w Eco 



Association (4) 



Seniors 







E. LYNN WATSON 


VERNON R. WEATHERS 


MAURICE F. WECKEL 


FRANCES L. WENTZ 


Veterinary Medicine, Agriculture 


CiiU Engineering 


Electrical Engineering 


Home Economics 


Manhattan 


Great Bend 


Garnett 


Ames 


Phi Kappa Tau, Agricultural Associa- 
tion, Blockand Bridle, Junior American 
Veterinary Medical Association. 


Beta Pi Epsilon, A. S. C. E., Treasurer. 


Alpha Sigma Psi, A. I. E. E., Y. M. 


Alpha Xi Delta. Omicron Nu. W. A. A. 
Hockey (1) ; Pri.x, Aggie Pop (l);Home 
Economics Association President (3, 4) ; 
Kappa Phi, Y. W. C. A. Big Sister 
Captain (2, 3. 4); Meat Judging Team 
(4);Eurodelphian. 


KAl 1 IRYN WHITTEN 

Hon-^e Economics 


LOUIS G. WIENEKE 

Chenucal Engineering 


HAROLD A. WILLIAMSON 
History 


KATHR^N L. WILSON 
General Science 


Wakarusa 
liaskct Ball (1); Hockey (2, 3); Base- 
Ball (2, -i) ; Swimming (3) ; Life Saving, 
I-ranklin. W. A, A. 


Fairvicw 
Omega lau Epsilon 


Manhattan 
Acacia, Pi Kappa Delta. 


Liberty. Mo. 
Alpha Delta Pi, Stephens College, 
Columbia, Mo. (I 2); Cen,ral College, 
Fayette, Mo. (3); Orchestra. Enchil- 
adas, College Opera. 


LEONL, WILSON 

Phy.ucal Education 


MARY 1 1. WILSON 


JOSEPI IINE WINTER 


I lOMFR ^'ODFR 


Wichila 


1 lome Economus 


Home Economics 


PuNu SJ,ool Bond and Dulusua 


Hockey (3, 4); Varsity (4); Volleyball 
(3, 4); Swimming (4); Baseball (3, 4); 
Rifle Team (3, 4); Varsity (3); Purple 
Popsters (3, 4); W. A. A. Ionian, 
W. A. A. Council, Women's 'K- 
Fr.Mcrn.iy. 


Cuuncl (-,rove 
Inters,,, i, i ■. f •,,un, ,1, \l|.|,,, 1>,. i,,. I„i,r- 
societs 1 ). i ,,, . ;, I 1,,,,,. 1 ,,.n,„nK- 

Associ. 11 1 .n,,h L, 1 ,,,, 1 ,,|.|,,,, ( ,,rls 

Meat |n,l,;:n,; I,, in, (4); ( ,,llr.4lMte 

4-H Club. 'I-. W. C. A 


Ashland 
W. A. A.. Baskcib;ill M ' !, Ii li^Kk 
(1); Home Hc,,n,„n„ \ ..,,,,.„„,. 
Aggie Pop (2); \--i, ' >.|.|h,i,n i U 
Y. W. C. A. Big Sim, I, K.ipi'.i 1^,1.1 
Vice-President (4). 


Manluillan 
Phi Mu Alpha, Band (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Orchestra (2, 3, 4); College Chorus 
(1.2); Glee Club (2, 3,4); Go-to-College 
Ouartet (3, 4); -Mikado." Glee Club 
Gambol (4). 



Page 280 



Senior:, 







\3 



VIRGINIA ANDERSON 
Horn-' Economic; 



ANNA \i. ANNAN 

Phvsical Education 



GARLAND M. ATKINS 



ANDRE AUDANT 
Commerce Agricullwe 

Lincoln Bcloit Fort ScoCC P;,,.^ ,\y Prince, Hai 

Alpha Thera Chi, Y. W. C. A.. Kappa Alpha Delta Pi, W. A. A, Enchiladas, Sifima Nu, Little Theater Business 

Phi, Eurodeiphian. Orchesis, Lrivol (3, 4); Swimming Staff, E^cauvais, Go-to-ColIege Team 

(1, 2) Hockey (1, 2, 3, 4), Basketball (3), ■"rhe Poor Nut." 

(L 2. 3;; Volleyball (I, 2). 



ETNA! I BEA rv 

Home Ea 



Phi OmcHa Pi, Enchiladas. Y. W. C:, A. 



G. c:t)KRELL BILES ELEIC'I ll'R (.;. BtiOII I 

Comnwrce Commerce 

C:hantnc (Math 

Osa.ucCity pj K^.ppa Alpha. TohaMo, Band (1); ix-lia Nu Omc-a, Band 0, -L 1 lam 

Phi Kapp,,, l'ilp',,l..n Pi, A. S. M. E., IVaiuai , I'.is, I SI . ( Irchcsi ra (2) ; ,|u,n. 

Newman ( lub, ( ,1 id. , ( ,lub. Scmum \ K n . P,,nh, II. n„ 



JOI IN T. BERIOLI'I 
I .,|^j,., Mechanical En'^ineerin 



.MI'R I I BRI'DII lOI' r 
l-:te,ln.al l-nnneenn 



BLAINI-; n ( (K)| B \Lt 
Ptihlu .S,lu,,-I Mr 



G. !•;. DROLLING! K 

Mechanical l-:n,:ineerin,'. 

Manhaltan 

'"^l^l"" K,,pp,i Si!;n.,i, Sr.ibbard and Blade, 

Mens Moiiai ,ind Ball. Class President i-U : 

Scarab, Senior Mens Panhellenie, 

A. S Mb, Ollieers Reserve Corp. 

Aeron.itilical Club 



K^•LE E.NGLI-R 

Eleclncal E 



Page i'Sl 



Seniors 



^ 




% 




ANNA M. ERICKSON HAROLD E FRANK 

Home Economics Agricultural Admi 

Clyde 
Y. W. C: A , Kappa Phi. Home Econ- 
omics Association. 



ALVA H. FREEMAN ORVAL FRENCH 

iralion Physical Educalion Agricultural Engineering 

Manhattan Hoxie Gencsco 

Alpha Rho Chi, Scabbard and Blade, Franklin, A, S. A. E,, Band (1. 2); 

■■!<■■ Fraternity, Football (L 2, 3, 4); Secretary, A. S. A. E. (4), 
Basketball (L 2, 3, 4); Baseball (1. 2, 
3, 4); Captain Football (4); Captain, 
R. O. T. C, (4); President "K" Fra- 
ternity (4). 



RAYMOND G. FRYE 

Agricultural AJininistralion 



ROY J. FURBECK EVA B. HIXSON AIA'IN A JOHNSON 

Ciril Engineering Commerce Agricultural Admini.Urat ,on 

l-rccport Earned Wakceney Kanonii 

Club, AKricul- Lambda C:hi Alpha, A S. C. E.. Kappa Delta, W. A. A. (1, 2. 3, 4); Agricultural l-cnomics Club, Anncui 

Webster, Oipiain, R. O. T. C. (4). Hockey (3); Volleyball (3. 4); Y. W. tural Associaimn, 

C. A , College of Emporia (1 , 2) ; Base- 
ball (3). 



)AMi:S L. JOI INSON 

General Science 



ROBicR I w ki:lloc;g 

Chemical Enginee, 



MAR I IN S, KLOIZBACH 
Electrical Engincerun 



IVER c. li:ar 

Agiuulluial E. 



I^hi Delia Kapp; 



American Che 



.use, Alpha Zela. Afi 



Page 2S2 



Seniors 



i 


^^H 


> 


S^K ■ \ 


f 




k' 




m 


%^tM 





■^rm 



;S£^<<^4siil 



ROBERT 1. LOCKARD 

Archileclurc 



LAWRENCE N. LYDICK MIRIAM L. MARSH 

Eleclncat Engineering Home Economics 

Norton Winfield Chanutc 

Alpha Rho Chi, Gargovlc Cluh, Steel Beta Pi Epsilon, Sigma Tau, A I. E, E , Kappa Phi. ^■. W. C. A,. Cosmopohtan 

Ring, Kansas Stale Engineer StafY. Executive Council of Engineering Club. Collegiate 4-H Club Staff, Kansas 

Open House Committee (4). Association (4); Director Shops In- State Teachers College of Pittsburg 

spection Trip (3); Sophomore Honors. (1, 2, 3); Messiah. Big Sister at Pitts- 

Ereshman Honors by Sigma Tau, burg. 

L'reshman Commission, Electrical Dele- 
gate to Dallas Convention. 



PAUL A. MILLER 

Electrical Engine 



(3); A. I.E. E. (3.4). 



\VARRI:N D.MOORE RU I H M (VDON(WAN 
Agriculture Home Economic 

Copeland 

Alpha Sigma Psi, Eootball (1). ("hi Omega. 



MILDRI-D OSBORN 

Physuol Education 

Delta Delta Delia. W A A . Cal^ 
Purple Pepstcrs, tiUi ( lul-' (I, 
Senior Women's Panhellenic. 



•RANCIS j RALi;ic;il 

Agriculture 

Clyde 
'hi Kappii. \lplia Zcta, Kl<id and 
-^eiiiel Klul\ Poultry Judging Team 
i>. ,\v--iMarn Manager Ag Fair (?■); 
>lanagcr Agl-au- (4),. Newman Club. 
Viincuhural .Association. 



ELMI-.R W. RANDI.E 

Electrical Engineering 



Jclfe 



MARGARI-.T i:, RANKIN 
InJu.Unal Journalism 

\\'aUci,ek\ 
Pi Ikia Phi. > W, C A . OrehLsna 
(1. 2): Clee Club (1); Press learn (i); 
I.indenwood College (1). 



MAR.|(M<lb. SANLM-;RS 

Home Economics and Nursing 
Clay Cer 



>K0 11 n ( S( 1 IKl \ipr 
Home Economics 



\lpha Ihcla c:hi. W A A il. 
Volleyball (.:aptain iP; I lome \\ 
omics A.ssocKUioti. I uther.in Siudi 
.Association. > \\ (" .\. 



Seniors 








CHARLES A SCHUBERT 
Electrical Eneineermt 



FRANCES D SHEWMAKER 
Home Economics 

Chanut 
Phi OmcRa Pi. 



FLOYD H SMFfH EVA A, STEWART 

Electrical Engineering General Science 

Wichita Manhatfan 

A I. E. E. Kappa Phi, W. A A , Y W. C. A. 

Baseball (I) ; Track (2) ; Volley ball (4) 



EMIL\ S. IHACKREY 
Ind. Journalism 

Manha 
Thcta SiHma Phi, Llnivcrsity of Kai 



ORVILLE W, IHUROW 
Commerce 

N-lacksvillc 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Kappa i^si. 
Pi Epsilon Pi, Tobasco, Y. M C A , 
Senior Men's Panhellenic. 



I'lif/c 2S/, 



Seniors 









m' 



^- 



,> ^'^^ 



RALPH V. THLIROW 
Commcro 



ROf I I TROMPETER CLARENCE C UHL JEANETTE VERSER 

Agncullure Civil Engin^'ering Gcn.'nd Science 

Macksvillc Horton Farminnton, New Mc-xico Oklahoma City. OULt. 

ambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Psi. Aiphti Camma Rho. Horticullure Club, A, S. C. E, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Enchiladas, 



Boxing (2); Tobasco, Y, M, C. A 
University ol Soulhern California 



Apple Judging Team (4). 



Pi Kappa Chi 



MILDRED A WALKER 
Ccwral Science 



JAMEiS J. YEAGER 

Agncullure 



DELBERT L. YEAKLE^' 

Commerce 



Baz 



Hoisington 
Sii'iiM \Vli.i I I' il.;n Kl.iek and Bridle, phj Sigma Kappa, Alpha Kappa Psi, 

K li,ii.iini\ I ball (2, 3, 4); Treasurer (4) 

( l.r Mil liiM I '> I S, L., Pax. 
S<_;ii:ib s ( . \ I'l. Kknl. (4); Royal 
Purple B..ard (!, 4), liudgel Com- 
miltee (4). 



^^^L^^^m^^mB 



a J 




Charles Corsaut 
Baseball Coach 



(OHARLES CORSAUT is recognized as one of the best college baseball coaches in the country and has 
developed for the Kansas Aggies some of the fastest baseball teams in the middle west. From a bunch 
of green mater-al the Aggie mentor developed a conference champion two years ago and last season the Wildcats 
finished in a tie for second place. Corsaut's clubs are always known for their pep and fight and as a rule for their 
ability to work "hit and run" plays when a few scores are needed. The Wildcats found Nebraska the "hard 
nut to crack" throughout the season, and losses to the Huskers, who won the championship, were largely 
responsible for the Aggie down fall in the title race. Coach Corsaut has developed some college baseball 
players who have done well in the professional game and each year several of his seniors have offers from 
minor league scouts to play professional baseball. The great American game has proved itself to be one of 
the most popular sports for college students and large crowds attend the contests played on the Aggie field which 
is one of the best in the conference. Another good nine is expected this season and preliminary outlook shows 
that the squad should be as good as in recent years. 



BIG SIX STANDINGS 



Nebraska 
Kansas Aggies 
Missouri 
Oklahoma 
Kansas 
Iowa State 



Won 


Lost 


Pet. 


10 


5 


.667 


8 


5 


.615 


8 


5 


.615 


5 


6 


.455 


4 


9 


.308 


2 


7 


.223 



Page 2SG 




Capaiii, 192 



L. M. Nash 
Captain, 1930 



Baseball 



IV/rORE than one baseball game was won during the season of 1929 bv the hard hitting ot the capable 
captain, Kirk M. Ward, Elmdale. Ward, although small in stature, was one of the most consistent and 
hardest hitters on the Wildcat squad. A home run in the last inning from the bat of the Aggie captain won one 
ball game and his timely blows in other contests were also responsible for manv runs. Ward played right field 
and came through with many thrilling catches as well as coming in behind the inlield and throwing barters 
out on ground balls. Throughout part of the season Ward was the Icad-olF hitter, bur later was put farther dow n 
because ot his hitting power. 

The leadershipoi the 1930 baseball team was placed in the hands of Lovle IVI. Nash, Long Island, probabU the 
foremost third baseman m the conference. Nash played two seasons for the Aggies in the conference w ith but 
one error and handled main chances. He possesses a throwing arm equal to that of professionals and is cxccp- 
tionalU- headv on his mlicid plaving. At the bat, there was one thing certain Nash wouM hit the b.ill. He 
was responsible for main of the Aggie hits and was to be dreaded b\ itpposing pitchers in the piiiches. Liked 
by his team mates and being a natural leader, Captain Nash is expected to lead the Wildcats throtigh a successful 
season in ]930. 



I 'a ye iiSi 



Baseball 





Kirk Ward 
Kigbt Field, Captai 

C. V. Conger 
Catcher 



npHE Kansas Aggies opened the season 
^ of 1929 with a 5 to 2 victory over the 
St. Marys Knights, the strongest of small 
college teams in the state of Kansas. The 
men coached by Steve O'Rourke gave the 
Wildcats a hard battle but a two base hit 
by Nigro with three on bases scoring 
three runs sewed the game up for the 
Wildcats in the fourth inning. Alex later 
scored on a wild pitch and the other 
Aggie run came as a result of a walk to 
Doyle who scored on hits by Ward and 
Meissinger. Seven errors, mostly by 
recruit infielders, cost the Aggies the pair 
of runs scored by the St. Marys team. 
Doyle, Barre and Freeman all did mound 
duty for the Wildcats. The second game 
with the Knights, to be played on the 
Aggie field, was called off because of wet 
weather. Just before the opening of the 
Big Six season with Kansas four regulars, 
Meissinger, McCoIIum, Evans, and Fors- 
berg were quarantined for scarlet fever, 
but were released the day before the game 
at Lawrence which the Aggies won 8 to 6. 
Ten walks by K. U. pitchers were costly 
and Alex Nigro showed his power at the 
bat by hitting a home run with one on in 
the fourth. Gilbert came to the rescue 
on the mound in the sixth and allowed but 
one more run when Freeman started 
failing. The hitting of Nigro, Captain 
Ward, and Nash were the features of the 
game. The Wildcat squad played tighter 
ball than they did against St. Marys. 








Baseball 




A FTER piling up a four run lead in the 
■^^ first inning when Bob McCollum 
clouted a home run after the bases were 
loaded by poor Kansas fielding, the Aggies 
faltered and dropped the second Big Six 
game to Kansas by a score of 7 to 6. Barre 
was touched for 12 hits which were fairly 
well scattered, but Thomson for the Jay- 
hawks let the Aggies down with seven 
blows. Kansas scored their winning run 
in the seventh inning on errors and two 
hits. Barre pitched fair ball for the Aggies 
but did not receive team support in the 
pinches. Two games were scheduled with 
Wisconsin but a four day rain prevented 
the Badger nine from playing here. The 
Wisconsin team came here and stayed a 
day and a half but seeing that there was 
little chance for a game within several 
days, entrained for' home. Captain Ward 
came to the Aggies rescue in the tenth 
inning of the opening game with Missouri 
on the home field and parked a home run 
over the right field fence for a 3 to 2 Aggie 
victory. All three of the Aggie runs were 
by home runs or fluke homers. McCollum 
hit one over the fence in the second and 
Ward circled the bases in the third when 
his single rolled through an outfielders 
legs. Barre^ pitched for the Aggies and 
allowed nine hits while Geiselman for 
Missouri allowed but five, three going to 
Ward. Conger caught for the Aggies as 
Meissinger had a broken hand. 




Baseball 




irUST to make the Missouri series com- 
J plete, Towler pulled the hero stunt and 
stole home in the ninth inning to beat the 
Tigers 11 to 10 in the second game. Doyle 
and Freeman were hit hard but Gilbert 
came to the rescue in the fifth and saved 
the game. The game had been nip and 
tuck throughout and in the ninth mning 
Conger and Towler pulled a bit of base 
stealing strategy and caught the Tigers off 
guard when Towler swiped home. Towler 
and Evans were the hitting stars getting 
seven of the 14 hits. Let down to four 
hits by Pickett, the Aggies lost a tough 
one to Nebraska at Lincoln 3 to 2. Barre 
was pitching for the Wildcats and allowed 
four of the seven hits obtained by the 
Huskers in the ninth inning. He held 
them scoreless until the ninth when two 
singles, a triple, and another single scored 
three runs. The Aggies played errorless 
ball but were unable to hit the pitching 
of Pickett. Meissinger got two of the four 
hits. The next day Armatis and Doyle 
staged a pitcher's dual at Lincoln and the 
Husker pitcher came out ahead, winning 
1 to 0. In the fifth inning a walk, an error 
and a hit gave the Huskers the only run 
of the game. It was the only walk that 
Doyle gave in the entire game. Both 
teams got four hits and the Aggies made 
two errors to one for the Huskers, which 
aided in making it one of the closest games 
of the whole season. 



LoYLE Nash 

Third Base 

Bill" Meissinger 

Catcher 
'LErTv" Doyle 
Pitcher 






xaf 




Baseball 




ITH the Aggie sluggers smashing 
the ball for 13 hits, the Kansas 
Aggies found the Iowa State Cyclones an 
easy victory in the first of a slated two- 
game series, winning 7 to 1. Lande, 
visiting pitcher, knocked one "out of the 
park" for the first run in the fourth, but 
Nigro hit one "bigger and better" m the 
same inning with Nash on base to put the 
Aggies ahead. Towler then singled and 
rode home on Meissinger's triple, the 
catcher scoring on a wild throw. Barre 
pitched good ball for the Aggies and 
Meissinger, Ward, Nash, and Nigro were 
hitting stars. The second game with the 
Cyclones was called off because of a heavy 
rain. The Aggies lost their first battle 
with the Sooners because of errors. Six 
errors were made by the Aggies, two com- 
ing in the ninth when the winning run was 
scored without a hit being made off Barre. 
Ward scored first for the Aggies when he 
singled, stole second and third and came 
home on an infield out. Nigro doubled 
and went to third on a sacrifice and stole 
home in the fourth inning. Meissinger 
knocked the other two Aggie runs in. 
Doyle allowed but five hits to the Sooners 
in the second game but was pushed to 
win 5 to 4 because of four Aggie errors. 
The Sooners scored two runs in one inning 
without a hit. Four runs were scored in 
the first with singles by Ward, Meissinger, 
Nigro, Nash, and, Towler. 




"Hoxie" Freeman 

Pitcher 
"Mickey" Evans 

Shortstop 



Baseball 





"Wally" Forsberg 

Second Base 

"Bob" McCollum 

Left Field 



|N a comedy of errors and wild pitching, 
^ the Nebraska nine defeated the Aggies 
8 to 7 in the first of a two-game series at 
home. Freeman started for the Aggies but 
gave way to Gilbert. Sloan and Pickett 
pitched for the Huskers. The two Aggie 
pitchers were nicked for 15 hits, but the 
six Aggie errors were largely responsible 
for the loss. The Aggies obtained but nine 
hits, most of them off Sloan, with 
Meissinger, Ward, and Nigro in the lead- 
ing role. Nigro hit safely three times, one 
of them a double. Armatis of Nebraska 
staged another pitchers dual but this time 
against Barre of the Aggies instead of 
Doyle and lost a gruelling contest 1 to 0, 
the same score he won one at Lincoln. 
Barre allowed four hits to the Huskers 
with no two coming in the same inning, 
Armatis getting two of the hits himself 
and one a double. The winning run came 
in the fifth inning when Ward walkeci, 
stole second, took third on McCollum's 
single and scored on Barre's infield out. 
It was the only time in the game that 
either team put a man past second base. 
Getting seven strikeouts and letting but 
31 Nebraska batters face him, Barre turned 
out probably the best pitched ball game 
ever put out by a Wildcat moundsman. 
Thrilling catches by Nigro and Ward in 
the outfield and by Nash on third aided in 
the victory. 




I'age 2<J2 



Baseball 





np HREE double plays by Aggie infielders 
■'^ came to the rescue of Barre in the first 
game of a home series with Kansas and the 
Aggies won 6 to 5 after being outhit 12 to 
7. Clever double plays in which Evans, 
Forsberg, Nash, Towler, and Meissinger 
were involved dealt misery to rallys by the 
Jay hawks. Four of the runs scored by 
Kansas came as a result of fluke home runs 
by Bishop and Fisher, when the balls 
hopped over McCollum and aided by a 
strong wind rolled far into the outer 
garden. Ward hit safely three times to 
lead the hitting attack and Towler hit a 
home run with one on base to help run up 
the total score for the Aggies. The second 
battle with the Jayhawks which was on 
the afternoon of Commencement day, was 
a crowning success as the Aggies pounded 
four Kansas pitchers for enough hits to 
score 17 runs to only 7 for the Jayhawks. 
Every Aggie except Doyle, the pitcher, 
obtained at least one hit and every player 
scored. Captain Ward,, playing his last 
game, hit chree,dmes,oneriof them being 
a double. Nigro'hit a home run vvith the 
bases full early 'in the game- and McCollum 
and -Towler hit-for- three ba-ses.— See-ing 
that they were defeated, the Kansas team 
started clowning, but Aggie runs kept 
coming, and even Thomson was pounded 
from the mound b\ the hittmg attack 







"Bill" Towler 

First Base 
"Hank" Barre 

Pitcher 




Track 




Ward Haylett 
Track Coach 

npPvACK has been one sport that has been sadly neglected on the Kansas State roll of athletic achievements. 
^ The conimg of Ward Haylett as head track coach last season brought about what looks like a revival of the 
sport. With almost no material, Coach Haylett is attempting to develop a good track team. Although slow in 
starting, track at Kansas State is on the way to success as the Aggies, although finishing last in the conference 
meet, scored twice as many points in the valley track meet. Never has Kansas State possessed a well balanced 
track squad but they have always had one or two stars, who could always be depended upon for a few points 
in a meet, no matter how fast the competition might be. Coach Haylett came to Kansas State from Doane 
college where he developed outstanding track teams in the Nebraska state conference, winning the title on two 
successive occasions. He has gone about developing track men by pushing the sport when the athletes are 
freshmen. With track material and competent coaches like Ward Haylett, this major sport at Kansas State is 
determined to be better within the near future. 




Ski;i;n, Wii r , Nui ir 



Page 29), 




T. F. WiNBURN 

Capt.im, 1928-29 



H. S. Miller 
Captain, 1929-30 



. Track 

npEMPLE F. "NURMI" WINBURN, De Kalh, Mo., was the leader of the 1929 track squad at Kansas State. 
Winburn was one of the outstanding middle distance runners m the conference, his outstanding performance 
being either in the quarter or half mile events. Winburn had better years at track during his sophomore and 
junior competition than he did in his last year, but he was a dependable runner and a very valuable man for 
the starting lap on relay fours. He was a member of the Aggie two mile relay team that has won fame for 
several years and also an outstanding cross country runner. During the year of 1930, Winburn has acted as an 
assistant coach in track and cross country. 

Harold S. Miller, Kansas Citv, Kans., is one of the most outstanding middle distance and distance runners 
that has been in Kansas State in manv seasons. Running an\ cxciu from the quarter mile to rlic two-nulc \n 
near record time and pacing the five mile in the cross coiinirx at a pace near the leaders, Miller h.is been a 
favorite runner in nearly every meet. He consistenrh runs the mile in near 4:^0 aiul does the h.ilt mile in less 
than two minutes on nearlv e\'er\' occasion. As the "iron m.in" ot the .\ggie squad. Miller li.is on sc\cr.il 
occasions ran the mile, two-mile and his lap in the rela\ , winning both ol his indi\ ukial e\cius. 



wmm^mms^rm^i^m^^m 



^y^i^^-^^mm^-^m^mi 



Page 21 



Track 



Lyon 

Walker 

forsberg 

Bliss 











KANSAS AGGIE track and field men placed in every meet 
which they entered during the indoor season of 1929. 
Captain-elect H. S. Miller placed in the K. C. A. C. meet at 
Kansas City in the mile event, and George Lyon placed in the 
shot put. The Big Six conference indoor meet in 1929 was 
won by Oklahoma with 39 points, and Iowa State ranked 
second with 36. The Aggies were last, scoring 6j/^ points, 
one half point behind the University of Missouri. "Babe" 
Lyon placed first in the shot put, with a heave of 45 feet, 
81.2 inches. In the mile run Miller was fourth, and O. H. 
Walker tied for fourth in the high jump. At the Illinois 
relays Miller won second in the 1500 meter run, and Walker 
tied for fourth in the high jump. The only indoor dual meet 
of the season was at Lincoln with Nebraska, and the Wildcats 
lost by a score of 18j/^ to HYl- Miller of the Aggies won ten 
points with his two firsts, clipping off the mile in 4:36, and 
the two mile in 10:04.2. Nebraska made clean sweeps in the 
sixty and four forty yard dashes, and the high and low hurdles. 
Captain T. F. Winburn placed second in the half mile; Hugh 
Richwine tied for third in the pole vault; Lyon won second 
in the shot put and Walker tied for fourth in the |ump high. 



^^mm^!^^m^^^^!^^^3^^ 



w^^^^^mmmmmmM 



T'ayc iiHO 



Track 




>»Wl 



I- \ 





FiSER 

Skeen 

Morgan 

Carter 



^ ^ 



IN THE first outdoor meets of the season, the two Texas 
events, Aggies did not do so well. In the Texas relays at 
Austin, Lyon placed fourth in the shot put, and at the Southern 
Methodist relays at Dallas, a two-mile relay team placed 
fourth. At the Drake relays held at Des Moines, "Bud" 
Smith placed fourth in the javelin event. At the Kansas 
relays at Lawrence, Miller placed fourth in the 3000 meter 
run, and a four-mile relay team placed fourth in the four mile 
event. In a dual outdoor meet with the University of Okla- 
homa, the Aggies finished with 33 points with the Sooners 
marking up 98. Clean sweeps of three places were scored in 
the two dash events, but Winburn placed second in the four 
forty dash. Miller tied for second in the half mile and phiccd 
second in the mile behind Will of the Aggies. Miller also 
won the two-mile event. Yeager placed third in the high 
and low hurdles, and Lyon placed second in the shot .iikI 
third in the discus. "Bud" Smith won the )a\elin throw, 
setting a new Aggie record of 184 feet, 8 inches. Livingston 
of the Aggies was second. Walker of the Aggies was second 
in the high jiinip, and the Aggie rcla\' tc.ini w.is dclcated. 




wmf.^^t^>mwmms;^^^^mi 



^•mei^^mmmB^^mimi 



Track 



a. 



Miller 
Livingston 
Hinckley 
toadvine 







A DUAL meet with the University of Kansas at Manhattan 
■^^ in May was another defeat for the Aggie cinder path 
men, the Jayhawkers winning by a score of 92 to 39. Kansas 
made a clean sweep of the 100 and 220 events. In the mile, 
Miller of the Aggies was first and L. A. Will third. Miller 
running the eight furlongs in 4:33. "Jini" Yeager placed 
second in the high hurdles and Walker was third for the 
Aggies. Captain Winburn was second in the quarter mile 
and third in the half mile event. In the two mile, Miller was 
third. Holt of the Aggies placed third in the low hurdles. 
Walker of the Aggies won third in the high jump. In the 
shot put, "Babe" Lyon broke the Aggie record with a heave 
of 47 feet, six and one quarter inches. Smith got third. 
Livingston was third in the pole vault, and Lyon threw the 
discus 135 feet to win this event, with Hinkle third. In the 
broad jump, Kansas made a clean sweep and the Aggies swept 
the javelin, with Livingston winning first, "Clem" Richardson 
second, and "Bud" Smith third. Lyon and Jones were the 
high point men with ten points each. Lyon won the shot 
and discus, while Jones won the 100 and 440 events. 



Track 








KoPF 

Yeager 
Nutter 

WiNBURN 







f 



i 



# ^ 



THE Nebraska outdoor track victory over the Aggies was 
not so large as the indoor victory, but was by a big 
majority of 118 points to 29. One of the outstanding features 
was the mile run which was won by Miller in 4:29.1, which 
was very good time. Miller took second in the two mile. 
In the discus the Aggies scored a clean sweep, Lyon winning 
first and Hinkle second. Smith of the Aggies took second in 
the javelin throw, and Walker scored a second in the high 
jump. The Aggies failed to place in the 100, 220, and 440 
yarcl dashes, the half mile run, the high and low hurdles, 
and the broad jump and pole vault. Lyon won the shot put. 
In the Big Six outdoor meet the Aggies took 19^2 points, 
with no place higher than a second. Lyon was second in 
the discus throw, which was won by Howell, Oklahoma, and 
fourth in the shot put. In the mile run Miller placed second, 
losing to Hoak, Iowa State. Walker tied for third in the 
high jump. Two Aggies placed in the |a\clin throw, 
Livingston taking second and Smith fourth place. Hinkic 
placed fifth in the discus throw. A four mile rcla\ team 
composed of Winhuni, Nutter, Kopf and Miller placed' foiirt h 
in the e\ent. The meet was \ cr\- last, one world's record hemg 
tied, and two meet ixxords broken. 



^% 



Page -99 



Track 



Elwell 

Coleman 

Ehrlich 






5*^11^ 




rr 

V 





# % 



THE first indoor meet of the 1930 season was the K. C. A. C. 
indoor affair in Convention hall at Kansas City. Lee 
Toadvine of the Aggies took second in the open two mile, 
losing to Dawson of Oklahoma. Milton Ehrlich, Aggies, 
took second in the high jump, leaping 6 feet, 1^ •,? inches. 
In the two mile relay Iowa State was first, and the Wildcats 
placed second. "Wallie" Frosberg placed fourth in the 660 
yard Shannon-Douglas Cup race. In the dual indoor meet 
with Kansas at Kansas City, the Aggies scored but 30 points 
to 55 for the Jayhawkers. Kansas swept the 50 yard event, 
and Kopf and Elwell swept the 440 yard run to make the dashes 
a split. Kansas took the half mile, but Miller of the Aggies 
won the mile run. Fornelli placed second in the high hurdles, 
and Hinckley was second in the low hurdles. Ehrlich lost 
the high jump to Stillman of Kansas, who leaped 6 feet, 
one-eighth inch. Jordan placed second in the pole vault, 
and Kansas won the mile relay. Outstanding times of the 
meet were: 2:02.4 in the half mile by Hinshaw of Kansas, and 
4:33-7 in the mile by Captain Miller of the Aggies. The pole 
\ault, in which Trueblood of Kansas made a mark of 12 feet 
four inches, and the high jump, were also good events. 



w^m^^^^i^^^^^^^a^^m^^^^^&^mwMi^i^^^^^i^ 



Track 








Black 
Smith 
Williams 



... ^^-^ 




A DUAL meet with Missouri went to the Tigers by a count 
oi 33 to 71 in the second indoor affair of the 1930 season. 
Kopf of the Aggies was third in the quarter mile, and Dutton 
placed second and Forsberg third in the half mile event. 
Toadvine was first aiid Captain Miller second in the two mile 
run. The hurdle races were clean sweeps for Missouri. 
Gladden of Missouri defeated Cronkite of the Aggies by one 
fourth of an inch in the shot put, winning with a heave of 
of 41 feet, 1-54 inches. Ehrlich was first in the high jump and 
Walker third. Ehrlich jumped 6 feet, three fourths inch. Bliss 
was second and Elwell third in the broad jump, while Jordan 
and Vohs of the Aggies tied with a Tiger for first in the pole 
vault. Only three Aggies were able to place in the Big Six 
indoor meet, getting last place with a total of seven points. 
Captain Miller placed third in the mile and Toadvine was 
second to Dawson of Okhihoma in the two mile run. Ehrlich 
won second in the high jump, being defeated by Shelby of 
Oklahoma. At the last indoor meet of the year, the Illinois 
relays at Urbana, an Aggie four mile relay team composed of 
Miller, Toadvine, Carter, and Forsberg, phiced fourtli. Miltt)n 
Ehrlich tied for fourth in the high jump, and Black placed 
seventh in the open 1000 yard run. 



^^^s^^^^^m^m^^i^^?^ 



^i^Mm^^iM^^ 



Minor Sports 




HOLLINGSWORTH 



S]LVERWOOD 



Tennis 



iry'ANSAS Aggie tennis players won 16 of their 64 matches in both doubles and singles last spring. The 
squad was handicapped by the return of only one veteran, Kermit Silverwood, who carried the brunt of the 
burden throughout the season. E. H. Bredehoft was Silverwood's team mate in the first team doubles matches 
and was the other singles entry. The Aggies opened the season against Friends, losing four and winning two, 
Silverwood and Bredehoft winning in the singles. Iowa made a clean sweep over the Aggies in two singles 
and doubles match in the second appearance in competition. Against Iowa State, Silverwood won the only 
victory in two singles and a doubles match. Silverwood won the only match against Missouri in five matches 
played at Columbia. Again the Aggie captain proved himself the best when he defeated Gsell of Kansas for 
the only victory in six matches against the Jayhawks in a series played on the college courts. His victory 
over Hambleton at Washburn in Topeka was the only Wildcat victory in six matches. Oklahoma "white- 
washed" the Wildcats winning all six matches in competition here. The first Aggie victory of the season was 
by a 2 to 1 majority over Baker with Silverwood and Bredehoft both winning singles matches. They lost the 
doubles affair. A 3 to 3 tie was played with Nebraska when Silverwood and Bredehoft won in the singles 
and were also victorious in the doubles while Worthy, Kipp, and Hollingsworth lost singles and doubles 
matches. Drake easily defeated the Aggies winning by a 3 to score in a series played here late in the season. 
Washburn scored another 4 to 2 triumph, with Silverwood and Bredehoft both winning singles affairs. An- 
other tie match was played with Oklahoma City University, each team winning three matches. The Jay- 
hawks scored a clean sweep over the Wildcats at Kansas in the season final, winning 6 to 0. 



"m^m^smm^^^^m^^m 



Pafic S02 



Minor Sports 



Golf 



A LTHOUGH the Kansas Aggie golf team lost but three of ten matches in the 1929 season, it was the worst 
showing they had made for five years, because it was the first time in that period they had ever met defeat. 
Losses were to Wichita university, Kansas City, Missouri, junior college, and Washburn. 

Dale Lott had the low average for the season with 74.15 for 18 holes. Gene Holmberg with 75-15, Gerald 
Smith with 75-7, and Ben Remick with 77.3 were the other Aggie players. 

The Aggies opened with a 5 to 1 win over St. Marys, as Remick took six strokes off par on a 72 course. 
The team average was one under par. In a return match with St. Marys here the Aggies scored a 6 to victory 
with Remick and Lott as low scorers. A two-man Aggie team composed of Remick and Lott defeated a Baker 
team 3 to with both Aggies shooting under par on the local course. The Aggies defeated Wichita 6 to on 
the country club course at Manhattan, with all Aggies under the 69 mark. Holmberg and Smith scored a 2 to 1 
victory over Kansas City junior college, losing the doubles match. 

The first loss in five years for the Aggies came at Washburn where they were downed by a count of 9^ 2 to 
%]/2- The matches were very close throughout. On the home course, the Aggies triumphed over the Washburn 
squad 13/2 ^^ ^^ '2- Smith and Holmberg defeated the Kansas City junior college pair again 2 to 1 later in the 
season. 

In two doubles matches, Missouri tied the Aggies 3 to 3 at Columbia. Jackson, Kansas City, Missouri, 
city champion, and Ballou, runner-up, defeated the Aggies 6 to 3 at Kansas City. Lott won his singles against 
Ballou. The Wildcats defeated Missouri by a 6 to score over the local course late in May with all the scores 
for the Wildcats being low. The last match of the season went to Wichita by a score of 12 to 5- Lott and 
Remick won the Aggie points. 











Page 30S 



])Ai}wr Sports 




SPRING intramural sports are not com- 
pleted until late in the season and consist 
of baseball, outdoor track, tennis and hand- 
ball. The results of the spring contests in 
the season of 1929 will be listed, the ones for 
the season of 1930 not yet being completed. 
For the second straight year, Phi Sigma 
Kappa won the baseball crown with Lambda 
Chi Alpha second. Members of the Phi 
Sigma Kappa team were A. M. Meyers, H. 
Karr, E. Mayden, H. Hvde, Schrader, R. 
Walker, H. Weller, B. Pearson, E. Auker, 
R. Vohs. 

N. T. Dunlap, Phi Kappa Tau, was the 
winner of the handball singles, and E. L. 
Grafel, independent, was runner-up. In the 
doubles E. L. Grafel, and J. E. Smith, inde- 
pendents triumphed over Dunlap and Brand- 
enburg, Phi Kappa Tau, in the finals to win 
the crown. 

W. Grigg, Sigma Nu, won the Tennis 
singles championship, defeating E. Rector. 
Grigg and McCoUum, Sigma Nu, won the 
doubles from Treaster and Scott, Omega Tau 
Epsilon. 

Lambda Chi Alpha won the outdoor track 
meet. Phi Kappa Tau was second. W. Cox, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, tied the 100 yard dash 
record; H. Bagley, independent, broke the 
broad jump record, and M. Ehrlich, Phi 
Delta Theta, broke the high jump record. 
H. Cronkite, Alpha Tau Omega, broke both 
rhe shot and discus records. 



T^4^ 




STARTING with only], basketball 
in 1921, activities in intramural 
events have increased to a large ex- 
tent since that time. Now twelve 
sports are in the held. Much interest 
and rivalry between organizations 
has been caused by intramurals and 
they are doing a fine thing to aid in 
the spirit producing and physical 
development of the students at K. S. 
A. C. It is the plan of the intra- 
mural director, Prof. L. P. Wash- 
burn, to get as many students as 
possible interested in intramural 
athletics and along with points for 
placing, entry points and participa- 
tion points are also awarded. Each 
year the high point winners are 
awarded letters on sweaters. Te:i of 
these are awarded and ten others re- 
ceive the letters. F. B. Prentup, 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and N. T. 
Lindbloom, Omega Tau Epsilon, tied 
for the high point honors last year. 
Others to receive sweaters were: 
R. B. Smith, Lambda Chi Alpha; 
H. A. Elwell, Phi Kappa Tau; N.T. 
Dunlap, Phi Kappa Tau; J. L.Scott, 
Omega Tau Epsilon; H. G. Bobst, 
Lambda Chi Alpha; L. G. Burghart, 
Phi Kappa Tau; A. C. Hadley, Sigma 
Phi Sigma; and W. K. Gngg, Sigma 
Nu. 



Minor Sports 

Is 



f § ,§, ,f f 





R. 0. T. C. 



Officers of 
the Unit 



James M. Petty 
Colonel, hifantry 




Maurici; Ros 
CaptiU)!, hij'cnitry 



Ray E. Marshall 

J'irst hkiitcnant, 

hifantry 



John H. Madison Halvor H. Myrah 

First Lieutenant, C. A. C. First Lieutenant, C. A. C. 



R, 0. T. C. 



G. M. Allen 
Colonel 



T. BoRIiCKY 

Adjutant, 3rd Battalion 



Staff 
Offi. 




R W. F-RHMAN 

hl///ti.nt, 2nd Biittiilion 



M. E. MiLLiiR R. (). Griip 

Adjutant, 1st Battalion Rce^/n/cntal Adjutant 



R. 0. T. C. 




Heliin Laura Dodge 
Major Third Battalion 



Margaret McKinney 
Major Second Battalion 



Page SOS 



R. 0. T. C. 




E. M. Leary 
A. H. Freeman 
T. M. Evans 
R. C. RiEPE - 
E. P. Lawrence 



OFFICERS 



Captain 
Captain 
Captain 

First Lieutenant 
First Fieiitenant 
R. O. Blair - 



K. M. Hall 

C. A. Murrell 

D. V. Jones 

D. E. Price - 
G. Blair 

Serjeant 



Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
First Sergeant 
Sergeant 



L. 


R. 


King 


T. 


H. 


Kershaw 


H 


R 


Corle 


C. 


A. 


Culham 


I- 


W. 


Ingraiiam 


C 


O. 


Little - 


L. 


R. 


QUIGLEY 


E. 


W 


Bennett 


G 


V 


Combs 


C. 


H 


Hedrick 



OFFICERS 

Captain C. J. W. McMullen - - - Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant K. M. Fones - - - - First Sergeant 

First Lieutenant J.J. Cress ----- Sergeant 

First Lieutenant L. W. Kilbourne - - - Sergeant 

First Lieutenant C. M. Rhoades - - - - Sergeant 

First Lieutenayit J- G. Towner - - - - Sergeant 

First Lieutenant W. E. Keyser - - - - Sergeant 

Second Lieutenant C. R. Mollineux - - - Sergeant 

Second Lieutenant W. Tolley ----- Sergeant 

Second Lieutenant G. E. Wise _ _ _ _ Sergeant 

J. C. FiCKEL - - - - Sergeant 




K 0. r c 




E Conip^ 

OFFICERS 

K. H. Pfuetze - - - - - - -- Captain 

M.J. KiNDiG -------- First Lieutenant 

E. C. Richardson -------- First Lieutenant 

G. R. Hanson -------- Second Lieutenant 

R. Patterson -------- Second Lieutenant 

E. L. Andrick -------- First Sergeant 

L. P. Miles --------- Sergeant 

H. D. Richardson Sergeant 



OFFICERS 

L. R. KiRKWooD -------- Captain 

C. A. Schubert -------- First Lieutenant 

H.N. Stapleton -------- Second Lieutenant 

C. E. Glasco -------- First Sergeant 

H. E. Trekell -------- First Sergeant 

H. T. Blanchard ------- Sergeant 

C. C. Parrish ---_---. Sergeant 

H. H. KiRBY -------- Sergeant 

L. F. Nixon --------- Sergeant 




R. 0. T. C. 




M. F. Allison 
J. J. Yeager - 
Tony Borecky 



G Company 



OFFICERS 



Captain 

First hieutenant 

First Lieutenant 



Ralph Shenk 

F. ZlTNlK 

R. F. Germann 



Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Sergeant 



H Battery 



C. M. KoPF - 

H. G. Mangelsdorf 

M. E. Miller - 



OFFICERS 



W. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant 

I. GORRELL - 



W.J. Justice - 
D. M. Earl - 
W. R. Chalmers 

Sergeant 



Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Sergeant 




R. 0. T. C. 




R. D. Harrisoj 
E. F. Jenista - 
Paul Pearson 



OFFICERS 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant 

W. W. Daniels 



W. H. Meissinger 
W. J. Caughron 
A. E. Chase 

Sergeant 



Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Sergeant 



OFFICERS 



R. H. Furbeck 
R. W. Freeman 
R. L. Hartman 
H. C. Boley - 
O. W. Howe 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
First Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
A. L. Reed 



A. Barneck 
C. G. Gates 
V. E. Harvey - 
L. N. Allison 
K. D. Cornell 

Sergeant 



Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Sergeant 
Sergeant 




R. 0. T. C 




R. T. Nichols 
S. T. Kimball - 
D. McLachlan 

W. H. JOBLING 



OFFICERS 



Captain 

First J/ia/tanuit 
First Li a/ ten a tit 
First Lieutenant 

A. D. BUCKMASTER 



C.J.Ward 

E. E. Daman 

P. C. Westerman 

F. E. Edlin 

Serjeant 



Second Lieutenant 
First Sergeant 
Sergeant 
Sergeant 



M 



OFFICERS 



H. R. Abernathy 
A. L. Hammond 
G. R. Vanderpocl 
A. L. Steele - 
R. Rogers - 
F. H. Roth - 



Captain 

Captain. 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 



H. C. Sawin 
Z. E. Wyant - 
C. M. Worthy 
J. H. Shepek - 
J. Romine 
M. B, Sanders 



Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 




R. 0. T. C. 



Women's and Men's Rifle Teams 



\ 




f\ 



f- 




r-rf-5 



r 




(3l in f^ ^^ 




Jack. F. King 

Brubaker Johnston Florence Van Pr.i 

Capt, Rose Clency Rasher Dimcr Sk 



Hahn 

LONGHEN LaCFY 

SlH.IN.. WllM.N 




Ri 

Sani^iks 

Koi-i- 



R. 0. T. C. 



Military Band 



Prof. Max 


Martin 




Banc/ Master 


Carl Ossm. 






1^ /V/f ■ 






Urm/? pAciioy 


Clarinets 




Cymbals 


Trombones 


Ray Beals 
H. A. Brand 
W. L. Edwards 




L. R. StHRUBEN 

Base Drum 


L. R. Beard 
Clarence Brehm 


A. Helm 




C. W. NOLDER 


B. C. KOHRS 

B. R. Lantz 




P. O. ROCKWOOD 


Virgil Unruh 


D. McKee 
Virgil Morey 
R. A. Van Camp 




Flute 

E. S. Shonyo 


Basses 
J. W. Jordan 


Trumpets 
J. A. Bryan 
Marvin Davis 
C. E. Powell 




Horns 

L. M. Bryson 

J. SCHLECTA 


V. T. Merryfield 
Maurice Schruben 

Snare Drums 


John Hamon 
W. E. Hoffman 




Baritone 


H. C. Rhodes 


Don Nutter 




Luke Schruben 


E. K. SCHULER 




liaBiC 



Activities 




Appi.. ToTTF.N, Ploger. Leak. Dorman. Burns. Neimoller, Ferguson. Kissinger. Stewart 
Kent, Redding, Herrington, Lyons, Chapman, Winston, De Geer, McFillen, Mosher 
Carter, E DeGeer, Coi.e M. Morgan, L, Morgan, Dawson, J. Morgan, Gibbs 
DuDi EY, DuFFEY, JoBLiNc;, Bakri, Ryon, Parshall, Rqss, Neiman, Anderson 



Tlie Aggie ^ 

OFFICERS 

Alton Ryon ---.__. President 

WiLLARD McFillen _ _ _ . _ Vice-President 

S. V. Lyons --------- Secretary-Treasurer 

Lawrence Morgan ------ Asst.Sec.-Treas. 

James P. Chapman ------ Publictty Manager 

R. W. Dudley -------- Intramural Manager 

"pLEVEN men, believing that there was a need for an organization among non-fraternity men on the campus, 
met on Wednesday, September 25, 1929, in C-26, to discuss this need. Alton "Tex" Ryon was the leader of 

the movement. 

Not much was accomplished at the first meeting, but at the second meeting '45 men were present. Much 
enthusiasm was aroused, and the men chose to call themselves the "Black Shirts" and to stand for democracy 
in its fullest meaning for the student body at Kansas State. 

Thus were the non-fraternity men organized. After a little while, however, enthusiasm died down. There 
was some objection to the name, to the method of governing the organization, and to the spirit of some of the 
leaders regarding social fraternities. These leaders and a few others, realizing the actual need for the organization 
and the good it had accomplished, did not desire to let it die out, so they reorganized. 

Keeping the original objective of the group as its fundamental purpose, a constitution and by-laws were 
drawn up and a new name adopted. At once new members joined the club and new life sprang up in the "Aggie 
Knights." Friendly to fraternities, this became the organization through which non-fraternity men take part 
in school politics and government, intramural athletics, and general student social activities. During the first 
semester the membership of the club numbered 69. After reorganization 18 new members were added. 



W0MW^^^W^'^y-^^^M:^^s^^ 



^m^m^mmmm^. 



Activities 



Engineer's Open House 



/"^PEN House has become an annual event, when the engineers receive guests and show them something of the 
^"'^ work done in each of the departments of the engineering division. Interesting and instructive displays are 
made. 

The first open house was held in 1920, at the request of the Farm and Home Week committee. Each year the 
open house programs have been interesting, but much the same as those of preceding years. Beginning in 1929, 
open house was made a separate affair. The usual program was enlarged to include an engineer's chapel, St. Pat's 
Prom, and a night display. A feature of St. Pat's Prom was the election of Chas. L. Brainard as the most repre- 
sentative engineer. This is an honor which is conferred annually. 



COMMITTEE 



C. L. Brainard - - - - Manager 

K. D. Grimes - - - - Secretary 

V. Beck ------ Vuhliaty 

ZiNT Wyant . - . - Koitting 

H. N. Stapleton - - - - Chape! 

R. I. Lockard - - - - Prom 

J. Brubak R ----- Lightmi 

M. A. CowLES - - - - features 

Allen Shelly ----- Aviation 

F. Hederhorst - - - - Shop Practice 

Austin Morgan 



R. H. Russell 

O. H. MOHNEY 

C. A. Rinard 
K. Latimer - 
C. Clayton 
w. boggess - 
Chas. Gunn 
L. Hamm nd 
J. R. Mathias 
Don Baldwin 
Power Plant 



Machine Desivi 
Agricultural Engr. 
Architecture 
Chemical Engr. 
Civil Engr. 
Electrical Eni^r. 
Flour Mill Engr. 
Military 

Applied Mechanics 
Signs 



Adair 
Baldwin 
Beck 

Brainard 



Brubaker 
Clayton 
Grimes 

Hederhorst 



Lockard 
Mohney 

Mathias 
Rinard 



Russell 
Shelly 

Stapleion 
Wyant 




4«A 



Paa« 317 



Activiti 



es 




Abell 
Baker 
Brown 
Greep 



Guthrie 
Harbes 
Harold 
Horne 



% jLJm ^ -M.^^ LORTSCHER 

mfim -..aJW McClure 

\ ^^ -^ Wk "^Bl^^ Nachtrieb 

_ _„ \ Bh ^ IHH Ross 

L 

Omicron Nu 

Founded at East Lansing, Michigan, 1912. 
Colors — Lavender and Pink Theta Chapter established 1915- Flower — Sweet Pea 

The purpose of Omicron Nu is to promote scholarship and put leadership in the field of home economics. 

OFFICERS 

JuNiETA Harbes ----- President 

Katherine Chappel - - - - Vue-Presideiit 

Myrtle Horne Secretary 

Winifred Nachtrieb - . . Treasurer 

Louise E. Reed Editor 

Martha M. Kramer - - - Faculty Advisor 

MEMBERS 

Vivian Abell Eva Guthrie Mary Maxwell 

Mildred Baker Ina Cowles Thelma McClure 

Gladys M. Benne Margaret Greep Flora Ross 

Orpha Brown Florence Harold Frances Wentz 

Lorraine Lortscher 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Maroaret Ahldorn Stella May Heywood Mrs. Emily B. Keulhner Ruth Kell Noble Rachel Wright Working 

Lilian Baker Araminta Hoi. man Myra Pottkr Elizabeth Quinlan Alpha Latzke 

Margaret CiiANEY Margaret M . Justin Amy Kelly Lucile Rust Tessie Agan 

Leone Bower Kei.l Aldene Langfoud Ruth Tucker 

Paae 318 



Activities 



The Friars 



npHE Friars, an organisation for senior men, in which membership is based upon scholarship, leadership and 
Service to the school, was formed at Kansas State in January, 1930. In the spring of each year, the organization 
will name eleven junior men who will compose the group the following year. These will be named at an impressive 
ceremony held during senior week — a week in which the Friars plan to take an active interest. 



OFFICERS 

John Watson ----- President 

James Pratt ----- Vice-President 

James Bonfield ----- Secretary-Treasurer 



Milton F. Allison 
James P. Bonfield 
Chas. L. Brainard 
Solon T. Kimball 



M.J. KiNDIG 

Clarence E. Nutter 
Karl H. Pfuetze 



James W. Pratt 
Herbert N. Stapleton 
John C. Watson 
James J. Yeager 



Allison 
Bonfield 
Brainard 
Kimball 



KiNDIG 

Nutter 
Pfuetze 
Pratt 



Stapleton 
Watson 
Yeagei 




Page 31!) 



Activities 




DuCKWALL 

Hartman 



Martin 
Walker 



Club 



^HE Gargoyle Club is a group composed entirely of Architectural students organized for the purpose of furthering 
social and architectural interests. The annual Beaux Art Ball is the principal social event of the year. 





OFFICERS 








Ruel S.Walker - - 


- - - Presnient 








Frank M. Hartman 


Vice-President 






H. I. Martin - - - 


- - - Treasurer 








Donna Gayle Duckwall 


Secretary 








MEMBERS 






R. E. Adams 


Vera Bowersox Ethel Eberii art 


Grace Hofsess 


G. E. Meredith 


CiiAS. R. Smith 


J. L. Armstronc; 


Neil Bowman O. S. Ekdahl 


R. Hoefener 


J. B. Morse 


W. |. Sweet 


H. W. Baker 


T. E. Bowman J. S. Florell 


E. D. Hollingsworth 


K. Netson 


R. Wagner 


Don Baldwin 


C. L. Brainard C. B. Freeman 


Vern Johnson 


C. G. OSSMANN 


P. B. Walker 


Ben W. Barmer 


HA. Brand W. I. Gorrell 


Hugh Jones 


p. Raydack 


L. L. Vrooman 


C. L. Barnett 


C. E. Bremm a. C. Hadley 


A. G. Krider 


A. Reed 


R. S. Walker 


V. C. Bates 


|. W. Burke A. L. Hammond 


Ben Lantz 


N. F. Resch 


E. R. Wallerstedt 


G. E. Bell 


W. W. Butler F. M. Hartman 


Murray Lesher 


C. M. Rhoades 


L. O. Washington 


). R. Bert 


M.H.D.CE R. Hastings 


R. I. LOCKARD 


C. A. RiNARD 


Max While 


Mary K. Bird 


I.. E DoiisoN ). |. Heimerich 


MuRT Makins 


F. M. Root 


Don Wiggins 


H.T. Blanch ^K^ 


Donna [^wkvj m.l T.'M. Heter 


H. E. Martin 


A. SmoiiER 


Elmo Young 



ms^s^^^^^^^^^^mmm^ 



Activities 



APPA BETA is a fellowship of university women of the disciples of Christ. Organized as Bethany Circle 
in 1914, It was changed to Kappa Beta in 1927. 



OFFICERS 

Neva Burt -..-.--_ President 

Josephine Winters ------- Vice-President 

Bessie Sparks -------- Recording Secretary 

Clara Miller -------- Treasurer 



Edna Allen 
Margaret Bierman 
Neva Burt 
Dorothy Christy 
Mary Lou Clark 
Dema Coleman 
Elizabeth Crawford 
Faigh Daigh 
Etha Dungan 
Florence Durham 
Helen Durham 
Katrina Eskeldson 
Geraldine Freeman 
Elma Filson 
'Eva Filson 
Freda Greer 
Thelma Hall 
Florence Harrold 
Marceline Hill 
IvALEE Hedge 
Ida Howard 
Mary JoBLiNG 
Mrs. Carol Kelley 
Edna King 
Julia Lamb 
Florence Landrum 
Alice Linn 
Clara Miller 
Mildred McBride 



Nelly McConnell 
Mary McKean 
Olive Morgan 
Marjorie Moulton 
A let a Peck 
Claire Price 
Frances Pickens 
Elizabeth Roniger 
Eva Roose 
Marjorie Root 
Joan Schafer 
Bessie Sparks 
Marie Sperling 
Elizabeth Smerchek 
Helen Smerchek 
Maurine Steele 
Leah Stout 
Madine Stout 
Beulah Stumbo 
Helen Tedman 
Velma Thompson 
Cleo Teter 
Ethel Trump 
Maxine Wickham 
Josephine Winters 
Delta Whitmore 
Irene Young 
IvA Zimmerman 




I Smi 



I'aue 3.' I 



Activities 




IriiKlll, BiiNNL! I, bi, JoiiN SiAi'LETON. 1 liiAUKUK, 1 Iammond. Sill-I.l: Manoll^duki-, Incra 
GoRRELL. Sweet, Kirkwood, Capt. Young. Lieut. Madison. Miller. Harvey, Gaies 
Cornell, Toomey, Parrksh, Freeman, Allen, Abernathy, Chalmers 



Mortar and Ball 



^ORTAR and Ball is the national honorary society of advanced course cadets in the coast artillerv corps. 
The organization was founded at the University of Minnesota in the fall of 1920. Kansas State chapter 
was installed in July, 1926. 



OFFICERS 

W. I. GoRRELL ---- -.___ Presidoit 

V. E. Harvey ---.-___ Vice-President 

H. E. Trekell --------- Secretary 

C. C. Parrish -------- Treasurer 



H. R. Adernathey 
G. M. Allen 
E. W. Bennett 
H. T. Blanchard 
H. C, Boley 
W. R. Chalmers 
A. L. Coats 
K. D. Cornell 
G. E. Drollinger 
J. Fickel 
R. W. Freeman 
C. G. Gates 
C. E. Glasco 
W. I. Gorrell 
A. L. Hammond 

E. F. Harmison 
V. E. Harvey 
C. B. Headrick 
J. T. Hoyne 

). W. Ingraham 

F. KiMES 
W. KiMES 

L. R. Kirkwood 



C. M. KoPF 

R. E. McCoRMlCK 
C. J. McMuLLlN 

H. G. Mangelsdorf 

M. E. Miller 

C. C. Parrish 

L. C. Rector 

A. L. Reed 

J. S. Rhodes 

J. N. ROMINE 

M. B. Sanders 
J. W. Schwanke 
H. N. Stapleton 
A. L. Steele 
R. A. St. John 
W.J. Sweet 
F. W. Tommey 
H. E. Trekell 

Honorary Members 
Major T. O. Humphreys 
Captain E. Young 
Lieutenant J. H. Madison 



w^^mm^&mm^^^^^ 



v^mM^^^^^^sm^^^m 



Page S22 



Activities 



'ORTAR BOARD, the national honorary organization for senior women, was founded at Syracuse, New York, 
February, 1918, to fill the need for a national organization to advance the ideals toward which college women 
are working. The organization is to promote cooperation between senior women's societies, promote college loyalty, 
to advance the spirit of service and fellowship among college women, and to develop a high standard of scholarship, 
and to recognize and encourage leadership. The three principles upon which membership is based are service, 
scholarship, and leadership. Xix chapter of Mortar Board was established May 26, 1928. 

OFFICERS 

Helen Hemphill ----- President 

Catherine Halstead - - - - Vice-President 

Ruth McCammon ----- Secretary 

Annie Kerr ------ Treasurer 

Margaret McKinney - - - . Historian 

MEMBERS 

Margaret Greep Annie Kerr 

Catherine Halstead Ruth McCammon 

Helen Hemphill Margaret McKinney 

Carol Kelley Gertrude Sheetz 



Child 
Greep 

Halstead 



Hemphill 
Kerr 

McCammon 



McKinney 
Sheetz 




Page SiS 



Activith: 



^:% A <^ ^ rt 





m 



1^1 



Lm 



Beadle 
Brown 

Daugherty 

FiNDLEY 

Goerwitz 



Grossmann 
Hartman 

JOBLING 

Lawrence 

Painter 



Pelton 
Read 

SCHADE 

SCHMEDEMANN 



Sherer 
Smith 

Talmadge 
Sheetz 



silon 

T\ /rU PHI EPSILON is a national honorary musical fraternity. It is established in most of the leading conserva- 
^^ tories and colleges in the United States. Election to membership requires outstanding ability in the held 
of music. 



Mu Phi EpsilcMi was founded at the Metropolitan College of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1903. 
Mu Mu Chapter established, 1922. 



Colors — Purple and White 



Clarice Painter 
Ruth Hartman 
Marion Pei/fon 



Drussilla Beadle 
Maxine Brown 
Lillian Daugherty 



OFFICERS 

Prcsicle'it Maxine Brown 

Vice-President Hilda Grossmann 

Corycspniidmi^ Secretary Bernre Read 

MEMBERS 
Edna Findley Lesta Lawrence 

Mary JoBLiNG Bernice Read 

Doris Anne Sherer Venita Schade 



FIowc 

Recording Secretary 

Treasurer 

Historian 



-Violet 



Gertrude Sheetz 
Gladys Schmedemann 
Alice Sayre 



Clarke Painter 
Ruth Hartman 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 
Edith Goerwitz 
Hilda Grossman 
Marion Pelton 



Elsie Smith 
V'elma Talmadge 



Page 32J, 



Activities 

Nev/man Club 

npHE Newman Club is an association of Catholic students, the purpose of which is to promote faith and 
friendship. 

OFFICERS 

J. P. BoNFiELD --------- President 

Marion Riordan -------- Vice-President 

Mildred Walker -------- Secretary 

Edward Sullivan ------- Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

W.J. Angeur L. Hurley J. F. Neiberling 

F. G. ACKERMAN E. O. HaBIGER F. J. PeRRIER 

J. p. BoNFiELD Helen Kinkead Francis Raleigh 

JusTiNA Brening ' Harold Lang Anne Rueschoff 

Paul Chilen Marjorie Mauzy Don Schafer 

James Corrigan Joe Menzie Laurena Sheetz 

Lucille Costello Caroline McCarthy Edward Sullivan 

Paul Dittemore L. N. Marx Quentin Stein 

Ed Dyer Margaret Marks Mildred Smith 

Joe Fickel Alex Nigro Mildred Walker 

B. K. Geraghty ■ Tony Merviis Agnes Walkensdorfer 

Adelaide Hutter James Neilson Martin Klotzbach 



bonfield 
Riordan 



Walker 
Sullivan 




aJIAj 



Vagc iliiS 



Activities 




Stahl, Stockebrand, Leasure, Dawe, Reed, Suplee 

Alsop, Trekell, Spangler, Wesley, Young, Tessendorf, Brown 

Brookover, Coberly, Elwell, Makins. Rhoades, Blair 



TQAX is an honorary junior men's organization composed of men who are outstanding on the campus and 
prominent in college activities. Members are elected in the spring of their sophomore year and membership 
remains secret until the following spring. 



OFFICERS 

MuRT F. Makins __--___ President 

EsRA Stockebrand _______ Vice-President 

Howard Elwell _______ Secretary-Trea surer 

George Brookover _______ Marshall 



MEMBERS 



S. Alsop 
G. Blair 
G. Brookover 
R. Brown 
H. Coberly 
T. Dawe 
H. Elwell 

C. GUNN 

O. Leasure 
M. Makins 



A. Reed 

C. Rhoades 
E. Shultz 

D. Spangler 

E. Stockebrand 

D. Suplee 

Z. Tessendorf 
H. Trekell 
V. Wesley 

E. Young 



Page S2e 



Activities 



IQHT ALPHA MLI, honorary general science fraternity for women, was founded for the purpose of promoting 
scholarship and leaciership among women students. The society was first organized in 1919 under the name of 
Theta Chi Gamma, and reorganized in 1921 under the name it now hears. Members are selected from the upper 
fifteen percent in scholastic standing among the junior and senior girls in the division of general science. 



Barr 

Brookens 
Foley 



LoYD 

McCammon 
McCrann 



Riin 

R013I RTS 





OFFICERS 






Geraldine Foley 




President 




EiLLEEN Roberts 




Vice-President 




T-. T) 




Secretary-Treasurer 




FERN JDARR 






Frances Sheldon - 


MEMBERS 


Sentinel 




Fern Barr 




Mayme McCrann 




Gertrude Brookens 




Anna Reed 




Geraldine Foley 




EiLLEEN Roberts 




Muriel Howard 




Frances Sheldon 




Bernice Loyd 




Inez Snyder 




Ruth McCammon 




Alice Triable 






rB^^ 




Activities 




Dean Call 
Dean Justin 



Prof. Henney 
Prof. Pearce 



1 Jtvappa Fill 

Founded at the University of Maine, 1897 
Established at K. S. A. C. November 15, 1915 
OFFICERS 1929-1930 
Dean L. E. Call ----.__- President 

Dean Margaret Justin -_-_-_ Vice-President 

Prof. Homer J. Henney ______ Secretary 

Prof. C. E. Pearce ___-__- Treasurer 

Prof. I. V. Iles - - - - ___ _ - Historian 

PHI KAPPA PHI is an honor society dedicated to the unity of democracy of education and one which is open 
to honor students of all departments of American universities and colleges. Not more than ten per cent of 
the seniors and graduate students who rank highest in scholarship are each vear elected to membership in the 
local chapter. A limited number of faculty members who ha\e evidenced superit)r achievement in their pro- 
fession are also admitted to membership. 

Smce November 15, 1915, 792 candidates ha\c been elected to membership. The active membership 
consists of the nevvdv elected who are still in school and former members who are in the vicinitv of Manhattan. 
There were 126 active members in 1929-30. 

Page 328 



Activities 



bcaJDDara ana 

L Company 1st Regiment established June 1914. 
Colors — Ked, White and Blue Publication — The Scabbard and Blade Journal 

QCABBARD and Blade is a society of cadet officers; a national honorary military society with subordinate 
organizations called companies, at several universities and colleges which have departments of military 
science and tactics. 

The purpose of the society is to raise the standard of military training m the American college and University 
and to promote intimacy and good fellowship among the cadet officers. 

The society was founded in 1905 by five field officers of the University of Wisconsin. At the present time 
there are seventy three companies. 

Election is based on both efficiency in the work of the military department and on the personality and 
sociability of the officers. 

OFFICERS 

M. W. Coble --------- Brest dent 

M.J. KiNDiG -------- Vice-President 

G. E. Drollinger -------- Secretary 

J. W. Pratt --------- Treasurer 



H. Abernathey 
M. Allison 
A. Barneck 

H. BOLEY 
T. BORECKY 

M. Coble 
C. Eustace 
T. Evans 
A. Freeman 
R. O. Greep 
R. T. Greep 



C. GUINN 

A. Hammond 
G. Jelinek 
E. Jenista 

M. KiNDIG 

H. Mangelsdori 

T. MuXLOW 

C. Murrell 
p. Pearson 
J. Pratt 
E. Richardson 



A. Ryon 
H. Smiley 
H. Stapleton 

F. TOOMEY 

Maj. Humphreys 
Capt. Bowen 
Capt. Young 
Capt. Rose 
Lieut. Madison 
Lieut. Marshall 
Lieut. Myrah 




Page 329 



Activities 





j.^'iA 





u^y 



Barre 
Beck 

BOGGESS 

Brainard 



Coleman, H. 
Coleman, J. 

COWDERY 
Co^A'LES 



Grimes 
Hartman 
Hederhorst 
Karr 



Tan 

Founded at the University of Nebraska, February 22, 1904. 
Epsilon chapter established at K. S. A. C, May 16, 1912. 



Colors — Yale Blue and White 



W. ). Arndt 
H. W. Baker 
H. ). Barre 
V. A. Beck 



Allen Shelly - 
H. A. Coleman 
Wm. Boggess 
H.J. Barre - 

G. C. NoNKEN 

B. R. Prentice 



Wm. Boggess 
C. L. Brainard 
M.J. Caldwell 
C. F. Clayton 
H. A. Coleman 



Pub 



-The Pv: 



OFFICERS 1929-30 



- President 
Vice-President 

■■ Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 

- Historian 
Corresponding Secretary 



MEMBERS 

J. R. Coleman 
F. R. Condell 

H. C. CoWDERY 
MA. COWLES 
R. W. pREEMAh 



L. E. Fritzinger 

W. I. GORRELL 

K. D. Grimes 
R. C. Hay 

R. L. Hartman 



F. Hederhorst 
J. W. Ingraham 
W. B. Jackson 
H. J. J'ODE 



^Mi^^^m^m^&^^^A 



l.3Cii®SE®£lSS«Sas*S: 



Page S:iO 



Activities 



Si^ma Tan 



QIGMA TAU is a national honorary engineering fraternity the purpose of which is to promote the broad principles 
of scholarship, practicability, and sociability among the engineering students for the mutual benefit of engineers 
and engineering education. 



OFFICERS 1930-31 
K. D. Grimes Preside. 



E. M. Regier 
H. S. Miller - 
H. E. Trekell 

M. A. COWLES 

G. E. Meredith 



Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian 
Corresponding Secretary 



J. H. Karr 
L. F. Kepley 

R. E. McCoRMICK 
R. H. McKlBBEN 

H. G. Mangelsdorf 
G. E. Meredith 
H. S. Miller 
A. Morgan 



MEMBERS 

G. C. NONKEN 

M. G. Ott 
C. C. Parrish 
E. F. Peterson 

B. R. Prentice 
A. L. Reed 

E. M. Regier 

C. M. Rhoades 



C. A. RiNARD 

R. H. Russell 
Allen Shelly 
H. N. Stapleton 
I. R. Stenzel 
Z. Tessendorf 
H. E. Trekell 
O. H. Walker 



Mangelsdorf 
Meredith 
Parrish 
Prentice 



Rhoades 
Rhodes 
Rinard 
Russell 



Shelly 
Stapleton 
Tessendorf 
Trekell 




Activities 




Barre 

Brainard 
Coleman 



Denman 

LoCKARD 

Shelly 



Stapleton 
Tessendorf 



4^4 



npHE purpose of Steel Ring is to bring about the unified action of the engineering division at Kansas State. The 
■^ name is symbolic of the welding together of the various departments into a single unit. The membership of 
Steel Ring is to include one man, but not more than two men, from each department. These men shall be the leaders 
of their respective departments, and shall represent their departments in meetings. The total membership has been 
limited to twelve new members a year in order to maintain a compact and easily managed group. 



H. A. Coleman - 
Allkn Shelly - 
V. A. Beck - - 


OFFICERS 
MEMBERS 


Presidait 
- Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasure 


Civil Engineering 
H. A. Coleman 
Z. H. Tessendorf 




Architectiin 

C. L. Brainard 

R. I. LOCKAUD 


Electrical Engineering 
W. R. Denman 

Mechanical Engineering 
V. A. Beck 
A. P. Smelly 




Agncultinal Engineering 
H. N. Stapleton 
H.j. Barre 

Flour Mill Engineering 
R. \V. Freeman 






Activitte:. 



Tketa Eps 



npHETA EPSILON, the Baptist college women's sorority, was founded at Iowa City, Iowa, in April, 1923- Delta 
Chapter was installed at K. S. A. C, February 9, 1929. Its purpose is to cultivate friendship, inspire mutual 
help and further self-improvement. 



OFFCIERS 



Edna Ehrlich 
IvA Larsen 
Edna Socolofsky 
Leonice Fisher 
Beatrix Charlton 
Mildred Rathbun 
Edna Pieplow 
Esther Lodenstein 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 

Social Chairman 

Corresponding Secretary 

Devotional Chi 

Historian 



Gracie Austin 
Mary Esther Brittain 
Ruby Colony 
Omeda Dickison 
Olive James 
Lois Mantz 



MEMBERS 

Edna Maxwell 
Frances Maxwell 
Harriet McConnell 
Ruth Mears 
Doris Prentice 
Dorothy Raburn 



Lyla Roepke 
Mabel Roepke 
Ruth Silkensen 
Luella Vanderpool 
Christine Vaughan 



Brittain 
Charlton 
Ehrlich 
James 
Larson 



lobenstein 
Mantz 

Maxwell, E. 
Maxwell, F. 
Pieplow 



Prentice 
Raburn 
Rathbun 
Roepke, L. 
Roepke, M. 



Silkensen 
Socolofsky 
Vanderpooi 

ZiMMERS 




Activities 




Bender 
Child 

Crawford 
Halstead 



Helstrom 
Hemphill 
Rockey 



Schmidler 
Sloan 

Thackrey 



Tteta Sigma Phi 

npHETA SIGMA PHI, national honorary professional journalism fraternity for women, was founded at the 
University of Washington in 1909- Mu chapter was established June 8, 1916. 

Publication — The Matrix 

OFFICERS 

Catherine Halstead ----- President 

Helen Sloan ------ Vice-President 

Helen Hemphill ----- Secretary 

Lorna Schmidler ----- Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Bernice Bender Ruth Helstrom Lorna Schmidler 

Vera Crawford Helen Hemphill Helen Sloan 

Catherine Halstead Sara Jolley Mrs. R. I. Thackery 

Esther Rockey 

MEMBER IN FACULTY 
Mrs. G. J. Boughner 

Pagv SSh 



Activities- 



N ORGANIZATION of Presbyterian Women. Founded at K. S. A. C, 1930. 



OFFICERS 

Katharine Harding _-.--__ President 

Elsie Mae West -------- Vice-President 

Grace Zeller --------- Secretary 

Ruth Graham _----_.- Treasurer 

Myrtle Johnson -------- Marshall 

Mable Ruthi -----_-- Chaplain 



Etnah Beaty 
Patricia Boult 
Doris Bramwell 
Louie Britt 
Gladys Buikstra 
Bernice Cousins 
Frances Curtis 
Margaret Darden 
HiLMA Davis 
Martha Dunlap 
Barbara Ehrmann 
Margaret Eiler 
Katherine Fullinwider 
Margaret Gillespie 
Lavone Goheen 
Letha Goheen 
Trilla Goheen 
Ruth Graham 
Ida Groves 
Grace Gustafson 
Velma Hahn 
Katharine Harding 
Esther Herman 

LORA HiLYARD 

Opal Horde 

Genevieve Hoyt 
Myrtle Johnson 
Vivian Kirkwood 
Velma Koontz 



Gladys McKown 
Dorothy Mannen 
Merle Mark 
Zola Miller 
Alice Maixner 
Ruth Miller 
Carol Owsley 
MiNA Paddock 
Lucille Palmquist 
Alice Peppiatt 

Mi LA PlSHNEY 

Nellie Pretz 
Marjorie Pyle 
Anna Reed 
Eunice Reed 
Thelma Reed 
Mabel Ruthi 
Mary Sayre 
Grace Scholz 
Ruby Scholz 
Gertrude Seyb 
Genevieve Shellhass 
Elizabeth Smerchek 
Gladys Schmedemann 
Ann Washington 
Mary Washington 
Elsie Mae West 
Ada Weise 
Grace Zeller 




ixnicr. Wi:i,si;. Owslicy, 1 Iilv 
AKDiNc. Koontz. McKown. 1 
, Washinc.ton, Boult. Cu.st/ 

ll-RMAN. IjIRMANN, WkST, C'i 



\\K\->, Gn \ 
Kinz, Sa 

FsoN. c:i 



WIIMK, Rm ll. Si 

rage SS5 



Activities 




ROBT. COPELAND 

PresidetJt, First Semester 




Raymond Hoefener 

Vresident, Second Semester 




The Wise Club 

(Named in honor of Bishop Wise of Kansas) 

npHE Wise Club is the formal organization of students and friends of the Episcopal church attending college. 
It has regular meetings Sunday nights, and at other times, and acts also as an executive body for the larger 
group known as the Student's Sunday Club, which comprises all the Episcopal students. 

It exists for the purpose of providing students with opportunities for friendship and service, and for church 
worship. 



Garland Atkins 
Philip Blackdurn 
Edwin Brower 
Mary Carney 
Mrs. H. a. Dodderidge 
Virginia Fairman 
Virginia Forrester 
Richard Groody 
Robert Heckert 
Harry Hunt 
Pauline Kegereis 



Lucia Kirkwood 
Mrs. Robt. Lengquist 
Frank McCurdy 
Henry Muth 
Hickman Price 
Hazel Roney 
Lydia Sellors 
Jane Sparr 
Whitney Teall 
Neil Van Hosen 
Neil J. Weybrew 



Helen Bentley 
Major Bliss 
Maxine Brown 
Margaret Chaney 
Hugh Errington 
Virginia Fielding 

EOLIA GiLSON 

G. B. Harrop 
Raymond Hoefener 
Richard Jurden 
Mrs. M. Kimball 



Louise Krauss 
Maurine Lewis 
Virgil Morey 
Channino Myers 
Stanley Prince 
Donald Ross 
A. P. Shelly 
E. B. Stott 
R. L Thackrey 
Elsie Wall 
Vee White 



F. G. Wyatt 
RoBT. Berry 
Georgena Bowman 
Hugh Bruner 
RoBT. Copeland 
Wm. Exline 
Willa Fisher 
Harriett Gilson 
Russell Hastings 
Electa Hull 
Isabelle Kaine 



Tom Kimball 
RoBT. Lengquist 
H. D. LoTT 
Dorothea Morse 
Winifred Nachtrieb 
Grace Reed 
Dorothy Ruscoe 
Dorothy Schooler 
JuANiTA Strong 
Mrs. R. L Thackrey 
S. F. Weybrew 
Mary Woodward 



Page 336 



Activities 



Y, 



C A, 



npO create an atmosphere of good Christian fellowship, to arouse an active interest among the men students 
in things morally high and worth while, and to be loyal to our school — that is the aim of the Y. M. C. A. 
at Kansas State. 

OFFICERS 

Dr. a. a. Holtz ------- General Secretary 

Gordon Nonken ------ President 

Karl Pfuetze ------- First Vice-President 

James Bonfield ------ Second Vice-President 

Ralph Melville ------- Third Vice-President 

P. O. Lautz ------- Corresponding Secretary 

CABINET MEMBERS 



Roy Armstrong 
W. B. Babbit 
Don Baldwin 
Francis Coyle 
Harold Crawford 
W. E. Curtis 
Frank Edlin 
Vernon Frye 
George Graham 
R. T. Greep 
Rodney Harrison 



Archie Hebert 
Russell James 
Tom Kimball 
Carl Martinez 
Tom Meroney 
Chas. Monteith 
Orville Moody 
Marvin Naylor 
Laurel Owsley 
Lewis Perkins 
Robert Peyton 



Robert Pfuetze 
James Pratt 
L. R. Schruben 
Wm. Schultis 
Ted Skinner 
Russell Smith 
H. N. Stapleton 
Howard Tempero 
Jay Thomson 
H. E. Trekell 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Dr. H. H. King - - - - - Chairman 

Dr. H.T.Hill - - - - - V ice-Chairman 

Hugh Durham ------ Treasurer 

Milton Allison Walter E. Moore 

Dr. J. H. Burt James Pratt 

John Correll C. D. Richardsen 

Chas. Corsaut Ray Russell 

Rev. J. P. JocKiNSEN Chas. Scholer 

C. C. Martin Jerry Wilson 




Activities 




Barr 

Beckstrom 
Brookens 
Child 

cortelyou 



Darden 
Darrah 
Fertig 

FiLSON 

Greep 



Hughes 
James 



Lamprecht 

McKlNNEY 

Porter 



Pretz 
Rocket 

Samuel 
Skinner 



Young Women's Ckristian Association 

E, THE members of the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas State Agricultural College, unite 
in the desire to realize full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. 

We determine to have a part in makmg this life possible for all people. 

In this task we seek to understand Jesus and follow him. 

OFFICERS 

Ruth Fertig ------ Sponsor 

Nellie Darrah ----- President 

DoRiNE Porter ------ Vice-President 

Helen Hughes ----- Secretary 

Margaret Greep ----- Treasurer 

CABINET MEMBERS 

Fern Barr Margaret Darden Rachel Lamprecht Mary Bell Read 

Sigrid Becksiuom Eva Filson Margaret McKinney Esther Rockey 

Gertrude Brookens Esther Herman Nellie Pretz Pauline Samuel 

M ary jo Cortelyou Florence James Elsie Rand Jo Skinner 

Page 33S 



Activities 

Women's Meats Juidging Team 

npHE women's home economics meats judging team competed in the Intercollegiate Meat Identification and 
Judging contest held in connection with the American Royal Livestock show at Kansas City, and in the 
Intercollegiate Meat Judging contest held in connection with the International Livestock Exposition at 
Chicago. 

The team placed first in the Kansas City contest. Vivian Abell was high individual, making the highest 
score on record for judging meat in any contest to date. Orpha Brown was second high individual, and Frances 
Wentz fourth. 

Nine teams competed in the Chicago contest. The Kansas Aggie team, the only women's team entered 
in this contest, placed fourth. Mary Wilson was high individual on the team, placing fourth in the contest. 
Frances Wentz placed seventh. 

The year 1929 marks the third occasion a team representing the home economics division has competed at 
the American Royal, and the second time they have won the cup. This was also the first time that a women's 
team from this institution had ever competed in the Chicago contest. 



'i^. 




Mackinto.scm.C-,.,!,/, 



Activities 




Animal Husbandry Meat Judging Team 

npHE animal husbandry meat judging team, coached by Prof. D. L. Mackintosh, represented the school in 
only one contest. This was the national intercollegiate judging contest held at Kansas City at the .A.merican 
Royal Stock Show. 

Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Nebraska, Pennsylvania and Kansas were the schools entered, Kansas placing 
second with a close score. 

M. L. Cox of K. S. A. C. placed second to the highest individual scorer by the narrow margin of one point. 
The Kansas team placed third as judges of beef and lamb and were the second best judges of pork. 



^m 






wm^mm^^mm^^i 



Activities 




(. ii oi'i,! \I\|FRUS, Hakl, Sliplee, Van Mevkrf.n, Rust. Jonhs, Jerden. Hayes. Thaller. Spangler 
I Iarizei l Patton, Cottrell, Boley, Cheshire, Love. Kurtenbach. Schmidt. Dimon. Avery. Page. 
Johnston, Geurkink, Wilson. Price. Helming. Stortz, Trull, McBride. Firth. Clark. Price 
Theiss, Guinn, Smiley, Colby, Crawford, Brower, Watson, Skoog, Jackson, Romary 
Alexander, Leasure, Bertz, Beebe. Miss Right, Clair, DeVries, Hamilton, Muxlow 



Junior /-imencaii 

Medical Association 



(K. S. A. C. Student Chapter) 



if-. 




[^uunki:, Kastni:r. Rush, C, I Iuixson, Or. an I Iur 
WliNIM-Ll , H, KIv.STER, Bi.ACKIUIRN, I'llOMPSON, Rl 

Bond, Miki-;,sf;ll, Bivins, Ai.li;n. Llidi.ofi-. EarlI' 
Hudson, Conger, Pickett, Peck, Reynolds, Fini 



Page 3/,t 



Activities 



Junior Livestock Judging Team 




Senior Livestock Judging Team 




Activities 




m'pll: judging team 

PicKUTT Mati 



Horticult 



urai ^lu 



npHE Horticultural club was organized in the fall of 1920 for the purpose of bringing together students 
interested in horticulture, and to sponsor horticultural activities on the campus. 



E. AsjEs 
L. Christal 

W. A. COPENHAFER 

H. S. Crawford 
H. Edinborough 

C. EWLING 

M. George 
H. Gilbert 



Prof. W. B. Balch 
Prof. R.J. Barneti 



MEMBERS 




D. Halbert 


R. ROMINE 


T. Harris 


L. Sellors 


C. Kelly 


H. Stephenson 


S. Kelly 


M. Taylor 


R. Mather 


R. Trompeter 


A. Meyer 


H. Walters 


L. Montgomery 


W. Whitney 


H. Nett 


T. Winburn 


C. Powell 




iMBERS IN FACULTY 




Prof. Albert Dickens 


Prof. L. R. Quinlan 


Prof. E. M. Litwiller 


Prof. L. R. Tucker 


Prof. W. F. Pickett 






Activities 




Scott, Coach 



BOCKENSTETTE 



Poultry Judging Team 



npHE Poultry Judging team, composed of E. M. Leary, R. E. Phillips, Jr., Mark M. Taylor, and Edith 
^ Bockenstette, was coached by Prof. H. M. Scott. The team placed first in competition with eleven teams at 
the Mid-West Intercollegiate Poultry Judging contest in Chicago, December 7, 1929. Other schools finished 
in the order named: University of Minnesota, University of Illinois, Iowa State, North Dakota A. C, Purdue, 
University of Missouri, Oklahoma A. & M., Nebraska university, Texas A. & M., and Michigan State. 

Kansas placed first in production judging, first in the written examination over the American Standard of 
Perfection, and ninth in exhibition judging. This is the third consecutive year that the Kansas team has 
placed first in the written examination. 



Grain Judging Team 



The Grain Judging team, composed of J. W. Decker, J. J. Curtis, W. H. Painter, and J. H. Greene, was 
coached by Prof. J. W. Zahnley. 




Painier 
Page 3UU 



Activities 




W. H. Martin. Coach 
Sloan 



Dairy Products Team 



npHE Dairy Products team, composed of M. L. Magaw, L. M. Sloan, and W. J. Lvnn, and coached bv Prof. 
W. H. Martin, participated in the judging contest at the National Dairy show held at St. Louis in October. 
The team placed ninth in a held of thirteen entries. 

"^ing Team 

The Dairy Judging team, composed of R. W. Stumbo, J. L. Wilson, W. P. Powers, and H. R. Bradley, 
was coached by Prof. H. W. Cave. It competed in two judging contests. The first was held at the Dairv 
Cattle Congress at Waterloo, Iowa, in September. Here the team placed hrst with twelve other schools com- 
peting. The second contest was held at the National Dairy show at St. Louis in October. Here the Aggies 
placed third in a field of twenty-eight competing teams. 




POWICK.S 

I'ayc S.'ii. 



Publications 



The 1930 Royal Purple 

nPHE Roval Purple had its beginning in 1908, when it appeared 
as a small class book. Since that time it has had a steady 
growth, until now it is equal in size to any year book published 
in a school of this kind. 

The 1930 Roval Purple is the first to be issued under the 
direction of the Board of Directors, which was created by an 
action of the S. G. A. in February, 1929. Needless to say, the 
advice and help received from Prof. Davis, chairman of the Board, 
and Prof. Keith, has been invaluable to the staff. 

Nearlv all of the individual portraits which appear in this 
book are the product of Arthur O. Browne. Additional pictures 
were taken by the Hixon studio, the Lisk Twins studio, Prof. 
E. T. Keith, and F. J. Hanna, of the college illustrations depart- 
ment. The campus views were made by F. E. Colburn, former 
head of the department of illustrations. 




Milton F. "Chick" Allison 

Editor 




E. C. Richardson 

Assistant Editor 

J. P. Chapman 
Classes 

Ruth Claeren 

Qr^ani':iations 



Marc 



McKi 



Organisations 

H. D. Smiley 

Judging Teams 

Catherine Halstead 
Features 



Jay Adriance 

New Yorker 

Q. \'. Brewer 

Jacket Woodcut 




John R. 


"Red" CoLiiMAN 

Manager 




R. C. RiEPE 
Treasurer 




Alton Ryon 

Advertising Manager 




W. E. Curtis 
Advertising Asst. 




Pauline Samuel 
Women's Athletics 




C. A. RiNARD 

Art 




Hugh Jones 
Art ' 




W. M. Whitehead 
Art 




Jo Keet 

Neiv Yorker 




Frances Hester 
Art 



Viihlications 

The 1930 Royal Purple 

npHE campus view section of tliis book was made possible by 
the original oil paintings by Herbert J. Demmin. Mr. 
Demmin's familiarity with the Aggie campus, and his love for it, 
added warmth to his work. The crayon sketches were the work 
of Glen Golton. 

John Coleman was assisted in the management of financial 
affairs by R. C. Riepe. Althouth his work was of an intangible 
nature, it played an important part in the success of the book. 
Special recognition is given to Earl C. Richardson, assistant 
editor, who spent much time preparing copy for the athletic 
sections. Since these are very popular portions of the Royal 
Purple, a great deal of credit is due Mr. Richardson's work. 

Other staff members whose pictures were not available were 
Alvin Crooke, who handled the administration section, and La 
Verne Huse, who did extensive stenographic work for the editor 
and business manager. 




Vaiic Sl,l 



Publication^ 




CoNDELL 

Davis 
Keith 



Sloan 
Yeager 



Royal Purple Board 



¥N FEBRUARY, 1929, the Student Governing Association of Kansas State Agricultural College moved to 
assume control of the Royal Purple by creating a Board of Directors to have general charge of the publication. 

This Board of Directors, consisting of three students selected annually in March for the year following 
and two faculty members chosen by the college president, names two candidates for each staff office, makes 
rules and regulations for issuing the annual, allows contracts, and has power of dismissal over unsatisfactory 

staff members. 

For the year 1929-1930 the board consisted of H. W. Davis, professor of English, and E. T. Keith, superin- 
tendent of printing, as faculty members, and James Yeager, Helen Sloan, and Frank Condell as student members. 

The purpose of all-school control of the annual is to make the Royal Purple truly and distinctly repre- 
sentative of the whole college — freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students, and toencourage 
the active participation bv all departments and all student groups in its publication. 



'§^mmmmm^^^m^k 



I'ai/a JiS 



Puhlkat 



tons 



The Kansas Agricultiiral Studeiit 

^HE Kansas Agricultural Student is a quarterly agricultural magazine published by the Agricultural Associa- 
tion, an organization of students in the division of Agriculture. 



STAFF 

Louis P. Reitz ------ Editor-in-Chief 

Alonzo Lambertson ----- Associate Editor 

Edgar A. Templeton . - . . Business Manager 

Carl Williams _ - . - - Assistant Business Manager 

Fredrick H. Schultis - - - . College Notes 

Howard L. Fry ------ A'uinni Notes 

George D. Oberle ----- Farm Notes 

Hugh Durham ------ Advisory Editor 

DEPARTMENTAL STAFF 

Harvey E. Hoch ----- Agriciilti/ral Economics 

J. Edward Taylor ----- Agronomy 

C. Porter McKinnie - - - - Animal Husbandry 

Richard W. Stumbo ----- Dairy Husbandry 

Merrill M. Taylor - - - Horticulture 

Eugene M. Leary _ . - _ . Poultry Husbandry 




Page Sl,i< 



Publications 




Bender 
Dole 



Flinner 
Halstead 



.aiisas 



gian 



npHE Kansas State Collegian is published by students in the department of industrial journalism, each Tuesday 
and Friday of the college year. It is an eight column practice sheet for students who are enrolled in courses 
in reporting, news writing, editing, soliciting, and advertising. Eligibility for staff positions is not limited to 
students in the journalism department. 



FIRST SEMESTER STAFF 



John C. Watson 
Earl Richardson ) 
Catherine Halstead}- 
R. K. Dickens J 

Elsie Flinner 
Gladys Schafer 
John Bird ] 
"R. K. Dickens/ 
Ruth Helstrom 
Fred Seaton 
Chester Ehrlich 
Kermit Silverwood - 



Editor 

Assistant Editors 

Campus Editor 
Re-write Editor 

Art Critics 

Society Editor 
Sports Editor 
Mauager 
Assistant Manager 



Pagr SfiO 



Publications 



s State 



effian 



IPjNlRECT supervision over the Collegian is left to staff members whose work at Kansas State has shown them 
capable of conducting a semi-weekly newspaper. The Collegian Board, of which Prof. C. E. Rogers is faculty- 
advisor, supervises policies and practices indirectly, but leaves ample lee-way to students. 



SECOND SEMESTER STAFF 



Helen Hemphill 

P. L. DiTTEMORE ] 

BvRON Herington [■ 
J. Foster Scott J 
Richard Dickens] 
J. C. Watson ( 
Edith Dobson ( 
James Howard J 
Johnson Holmes 
Rachael Lamprecht\ 
Clare Harner / 

Edith Dobson \ 
Esther Rockey/ 
Fred Seaton 
Harry S. Dole 
Kermit SilverwoodI 
Edward F. Woods j 



Editor 
Assistant Editors 



Campus Echoes 
Society Editors 

Features 

Sport Editor 
Manager 

Assistant Nlanai 



Helstrom 
Hemphill 



SiLVliRWOOD 

Watson 




Page 351 



PtiblicaUon. 




Beck 

Brainard 
burghart 
Clayton 



COWLES 

Fritzinger 
Grimes 

GUNN 



Leverett 

LOCKARD 
MOHNEY 

Makins 



Roth 

Shelly 

Stapleton 
Wyant 



The Kansas State Engineer 

^HE Kansas State Engineer is a quarterly magazine published in the interests of the engineering profession by 
the student members of the Division of Engineering. 



Editoyuil St,jff 

C. L. Brainard - - Editor 

ZiNT Wyant - - - Assoc/atc EJittir 

H.N. Stapleton - - Asirttaiit Editor 

Allen Shelly - - Technical F^ditor 

Jack Sanders - - - Campus Editor 
E. D. HoLLiNc.swoRTH - - Alunint Editor 

R. I. LocKARD - - - Art Editor 

Earl North - - - ]okc Editor 

Faculty Advisor 
Prof. J. P. Calderwood - Faculty Advisor 



Bii> 



V. A. Beck 

K. D. Grimes 

F. H. Roth 

L. E. Fritzinc.er 

M. F. Makins - 

L. I. Owsley 



O. M. MoHNEY 

Alden Krider 
M. Leverett 
C. F. Clayton 
Marion Cowles 
Chas. Gunn 

L. BuRt.HART 



s Staff 

Business Manager 
Asst. Business Manager 
Circulation Manager 
Asst. Circulation Manage 
Advertising Manager 
Treasurer 



Departmental Staff 



Agricultural Engineer 
Architecture 
Chemical Engineer 
Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Flour Mill Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 



'^^mm^^m^^^^m^ 



IScS^Sill^g^S^^^g^^^gJiS^s^^ 



Pane 352 



SPRING ZEPHYRS 



Miss Cord Stout 



Spring Queen 




c*i<r, 



r^ 



iW\t 






Of* 



nfc^F 



*. 



t. 



M '} 



'^ 'J 



%k 



There are several "spring annuals" on 

ij this page. The most noticeable is the 

ii young man at the left singing in the 

bathtub. Above the cadet officers, 

Prexy, and the honorary officers review 

the regiment, and just below a number of 

W. A. A. enthusiasts rest after a long hike. 

At the left above the Scarab initiates smile 

for the cameraman. Just below a number of 

summer school students with their piles of 

books prepare for a long afternoon of study(!), 

while members of the girl's rifle team execute 

right shoulder -arms. At the lower left is the 

Tri Delta winning act in Aggie Orpheum, 

.md at the bottom Loraine Barrett and Eva 

Mae Smallev hold an interpretive pose. 



..LLy^v..^ 



A 




This page is not dedicated to Zeke Rich- 
ardson, but his picture does appear in 
several places. First he is seen as a member 
of the bathing beauty trio at the left, the 
goldbricking gang at the right, and the 
kitchen police at the extreme right. Above 
the engineers prepare to survey something, 
and the mess line forms on the right. At 
the right, also may be seen the Aggies on 
the 3 inch anti-air craft gun, v\'hile others 
may be seen on the firing line with the 
rifle and pistol. At the lower right a quiet 
camp street is shown, but a closer view 
brings something like the picture at the 
bottom. 











More summer camp scenes are presented on 
this page, with Mickey Evans leading at 
the top. Below him, a picture of an almost 
perfect explosion of a white phosphorous 
hand grenade is seen. At the left Solon 
Kimball stands at attention uncovered for 
the camp photographer, while at his left 
the pit detail sweats through the lon^ 
afternoon. At the left below is another 
view of a platoon street with the tents 
furled. At the bottom is a picture of the 
members of Scabbard and Blade, national 
honorary military fraternity, who attended 
the R. O. T. C. summer camp at Fort 
Leavenworth in 1929. 





K Fraternity initiates catch a little on 
this page with eggs, castor oil, and 
onions. The Mortar and Ball initiates 
pronounce a benediction on the In- 
fantry. At the right Shorty Miller gets 
ready to promote another fight for 
some of his boys, who are: Patton, at 
the upper right, and Thompson, to the 
right of Miller. At the bottom are the 
entries in the amateur tournament at 
Salina in February. From left to right 
they are: Kid Bauman, K. O. Coleman, 
Socko Dillard, Bad Man Jones, and 
Dynamite Haney. Haney won the 
championship in the featherweight 
class and Coleman came home with 
the welterweight crown. 





Seniors, led by the president and the 
faculty, march with measured tread to- 
ward the auditorium where they will re- 
ceive the start on their long, long journey 
through life. These pictures were taken as 
the 1929 class was led to the gallows. 
Several of the oldest living college students 
in school were ground out at this com- 
mencement exercise. At the left, Flor 
Zapata and his Troubadours pose with 
their stringed instruments. They are, from 
left to right: Francisco Taberner, Abraham 
Asis, Francisco Asis, and Flor B. Zapata, 
natives of the Philippine Islands. 





Here are a few snapshots from the 1929 
baseball season. At the top Hank Barre 
slips in a fast one, while just below Nigro 
scores in the Kansas game. At the upper 
right Meissinger picks one of Barre's 
pitches out of the dirt, and at the left 
Nigro puts a high one into the power 
plant. In the center, an Aggie batter 
knocks a high fly ball far into the outer 
districts, and just below is pictured an 
exciting play at home base in the Kansas 
game. Below, Mickey Evans gives the left 
fielder a little exercise when he knocks a 
hot one down the third base line. 





3I£.H,,^ 



d 



f ^.^ I 






•■■'.'v^i^*' 



i i « i >" - .B " - 



spring zephyrs bring ideas of doing a number of things, 
among them horse back riding, which Alex Nigro is 
attempting to do at the right. Above at the left some 
Betas are pulling one of their younger members apart to 
see what makes the wheels go round. Above center is 
the scene of many an initiation, the water tower. Just 
below is a typical fraternity bedroom party. In the lower 
half Pete Peterson basks in the sun, while underneath 
the Pi Phis smile for us. Red Coleman looks tough, a 
hold up occurs, the Farm House fights, and the Alpha 
Rho Chis go through hell week. 



> -^ a 



i 






'\^ 



Price None ^ 



\r JuneU93p /.I 

If Yoo fee\ /iKeTHE 

NEW YORKER/- 




The New Yorker 



MODERN MACHINES for 

MODERN 
FARMERS 




Windrow Harvesters — Pick-Ups 
Attachments 



O^asBALDWIN 

Combines 



The Gleaner Baldwin Combine is the machine for 
modern farmers, because it SAVES TIME— SAVES 
GRAIN— SAVES LABOR and therefore, makes greater 
profits from grain growing certain . 

The Gleaner Baldwin Combine is lighter in weight, 
costs less to buy and to operate, saves more grain under 
more conditions, is better built, provides greater thresh- 
ing capacity per inch of threshing cylinder, greater separ- 
ating capacity per pound of weight and per foot of cutter 
bar. 

These points of superiority in the Gleaner Baldwin 
Combine, are made possible because of modern design 
and precise construction. It's a real dollars-and-cents 
profit you get in this modern machine. 

The Gleaner Combine Harvester Corporation now 
supplies, in addition to the Gleaner Baldwin Combine, a 
Windrow Harvester and Pick-Up Attachment, Gleaner 
Green Top Grain Bins and Gleaco Hammer-type Feed 
Grinders. 

There is a Gleaner Baldwin dealer near your home. It 
will pay you to see him. 



The Gleaner Combine 
Harvester Corp. 

Independence, Missouri 



r >=.eAiDWlN 





THt TALK OF THE TOWN 



Snorts and Hee Haws 

¥N HIS ramblings around the village, certain events and 
happenings have come to the attention of the corre- 
spondent which are here recorded for the benefit of those 
who may be interested in all goings on. 

The latest matter of interest that has come to light 
is the disputed addition to the Kappa chapter. Many 
pros and cons have been offered, but the facts are these. 
On or about April 2, a "blessed event" came to pass and 
Mrs. Erlene Taylor, the Kappa cook, became the mother 
of a fine bouncing nine-pound baby boy, her fifth child. 
Mrs. Taylor has been preparing the salads and peanut 
butter sandwiches at the Kappa house for some two years 
running now, and the girls were therefore very much 
interested in the child, especially in the matter of giving 
him a name. 

A personal trip was made to the home by a number 
of the girls and when they returned to the house there 
was deep consultation and much thought. 

Ruth Emrich finally became the arbitrator of the 
little group. She suggested a combination — a gathering 
together of all the suggested names, thus making an all 
inclusive, well rounded name, although one that might 
be a little unwieldy because of its length. 

So the name became Jessie James Arthur Ta\'lor. 
Jessie was captured from that faithful Kappa friend, Jess 
Woods. James came from the two staunch Kappa sup- 
porters, James Pratt and James Amis. Arthur owes its 
derivation to the name of that undving Kappa booster 
and lover, Arthur Everett. 

This correspondent, in his in\estigation of the matter, 
found that James Pratt had left for C^hicago the c\cniiig 
before the event came to pass. James Amis has not been 



in the village since the beginning of the second semester. 
So only these two, Jess and Arthur, were left to bear the 
brunt of the many titterings that passed from mouth to 
mouth those few days. 

To shorten the identification and still preserve the 
full significance of the name, the baby has been called 
"Sigma Nu Baby." At the last report, mother and child 
were doing nicely. 



It is our patriotic duty to warn all residents and future 
citizens of K. S. A. C. about the ancestry of one of the 
leading fraternities on our campus, and we might as well 
add right here that they are leading in a number of little 
incidents. On the twenty-second of February (and this 
isn't a story of George and his hatchet). Beta Theta Pi 
holds its annual dinner with the pigs. You might say, 
that this is just sort of a family reunion, where old songs 
can be resung and old grunts can be regrunted. We feel 
that above all things that this bit of news should reach 
all of those who are regarded now, as possible and prob- 
able Betas, so that they have an opportunity to know 
just what sort of a pen they are getting into. 



"You all can open the letter," said the Kappa from 
Oklahoma to her sister ivom .\rkansa\v, "there's a 
chance that it mav ct)ntain something important." 

"We direct our sales onl\ to the biggest organiza- 
tions, and feel that \"ou would be interested in rhe pi. in 
we have to oiler," the letter read. "1 wonder it it's a 
set of books or a piano the\'re rr\ iiig to sell us this 
time?'" "Read on Okl.ihonia." 



[J^.o>iti)i//cl 1)11 p ifi^i' 3(5 3) 



The New Yorker 



A Number 

of the men of Kansas State 
are on our payroll 

Helping to make ours 
one of the best and 
strongest concerns 
of its kind in the 
middle west - - - - 

Here They Are -> 

M. J. (Jack) Kennedy, 75 Harry L. Felten, '26 

Francis L. Wilson, '28 C. L. (Cotton) Coe, '27 

Sam A. Simpson, '21 Geo. L. Pryor, '32 

Paul A. (Red) Carnahan, '17 J. B. (Bert) Claywell, '11 

{Additional Aggie men and ivomen are employed 
in our various operating companies) 

The Public Utilities Investment Co. 

Nathan L. Jones, President 

INVESTMENT BANKERS 

{and affiliated public utility and other companies) 
GENERAL OFFICES -- SALINA, KANSAS 



I'age JU2 



The New Yorker 



(Coat ! lined fro/// page }6l) 

"In order to present this plan to you fairly, a sales- 
man will call on you in a few days and is desirous of 
having the entire group assembled for a short meeting." 

The salesman called. In the few days that had elapsed 
between the time of the letter and the anticipated visit, 
the letter had been posted and excitement "raged." The 
salesman's first words were a request that the girls come 
outside and see his wares. And there it was, complete 
in every respect, not a thing missing; the newest and 
most fashionable model in milking machines! 
* * * 

A dark gentleman, who spends a great deal of his 
time at the house at the corner of sixteenth and Fairchild, 
often called on a dark miss, who spends the greater part 
of her time at a house on Sixteenth street. Certainly it 
wasn't a little child or children that led them this time. 
What we really mean is that the proper start was given 
the Alpha Xi Deltas and the Sigma Alpha Epsilons, 
when the negro boy that works for the Sig Alphs became 
devoted to the girl who is maid at the Alpha Xi house. 
Since the first romance started, three others followed in 



rather rapid succession. In the case of the first pm, it 
took an A. T. O. to wake the boy up. In the second case, 
and really probably the most exciting of all, an event 
occurred soon after a trip to Georgia, which both parties 
enjoyed. It has been rumored that one half of the 
romance desired to put on the pin before returning to 
Manhattan, but she didn't have the chance. 



Kappa Sigma seems to have made up their mind 
that they are going to make a place on the hill for them- 
selves, one way or another, and they don't seem to care, 
whether this place is famous or notorious. A few mem- 
bers and the annual Roughneck party event have some- 
what successfully achieved this latter distinction. 

In good old Kappa Sigma language, the parry was a 
"fair go" and "plenty slick." It seems to be their idea 
of an honor because they delight in broadcasting the 
fact that they "nearly got kicked out of school." 

Cheer up little boys, maybe there will come a time, 
when you can really do something naughty, so that your 
conversations won't have to be dav dreams, and Dean 
and Prexy will make it "Plentv Hot" for vou. 



LlTTUl- \A/IU.\E 
"ROTCORPS 







AT 3 
^^ONTHS 
\VE WAS 

V/IT4A A. 




WE 



CoOL3> 







SorAEPAY /VN^WA 




ArW ' SV\XC«>5 



^AHHM-tAN 




Page ilC.I 



The New Yorker 



Fashion-Rite Clothes 

for the man 
who wants to be in the 
"well dressed circle." 

Hand tailored of the 

best fabrics and 

styled to please 

the most critical. 

I WHERE CASH BUYS MORE | 

300 Poyntz 

'^ Where the boys trade" 



SERVING YOU 

is our greatest pleasure— 
Three Rexall Stores 



AGGIE REXALL 
1227 MORO 



KINNEY & PETRICH 
331 POYNTZ 



FRANK M. CROOKE 
231 POYNTZ 



STUDENTS INN 

IS 

THE PLACE TO EAT 

^-— u^. 

There is comfort, care, good eats — 
and plenty of them 

Taste Tells 

<*«'— p^ 

AGGIEVILLE 



X OU need not spend a great deal 
of money to have beautiful furni- 
ture. We have a wide range of 
selections at prices you can afford 
to pay. 



DIEHL HEDGE 
FURNITURE CO. 



304 Poyntz Ave. 



Manhattan 



Kansas 



Page 36J, 



The New Yorker 



Van Zilian 

'HILE a New Yorker section might be considered 
as an influence of levity and mirth, it is also wise 
and well and kindly, girls and boys, that it should 
evaluate the more ethereal things of life. 

Let us perchance and forsooth, friends, look into the 
development of the Better Things at Kansas State. What 
could be more direct than to glimpse the devotional 
leader of one of the classes, say the seniors during the 
second semester? 

This person is none other than James Pratt, a quiet, 
unobtrusive sort of chap, conservative in speech and 
manner almost to the point of frigidity. 

As he trudges in slow pace about the -campus, one 
can almost visualize him in the black robes of a monk, 
treading softly through dark corridors and dim door- 
ways, starting little candle hres and droning vague 
incantations in the half-light of some old cathedral. 

"Jim" as the devout is called by his classmates, has 
a mission. He dramatizes for his fellows the lives of men 
seldom associated with the college life. And he en- 
lightens his followers with a new story every day . . . 
Even the Brown Bull couldn't print it. 




Thk vkry RiciHT Rev. Father James Wilson Pratt about 
TO dispatch himself on some blessed errand of mercy. 



Good Luck 

To All Of You 
This Summer. 



Bring A New- 
Student Back 
And See Us 
For 
Your School Supplies 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

Aggieville 



THE ROYAL PORTABLE 
TYPEWRITER 

Always Best — Now Better 

See this machine before you buy a 

Portable Typewriter 

TYPEWRITERS sold, rented, repaired 

Mimeographic and Typing Work 

MANHATTAN TYPEWRITER 
EMPORIUM 

405-A Poyntz, (Up stairs) Dial 2086 
Manhattan, Kansas 



Farmers Union Co-operative 
Association 

Difii/ers in 

Grain, Seeds, Produce, Coal and Oil 

Harold Wis re, mi:, Ali;/- 



The Neiv Yorker 




GRAND CHAMPION CAR OF FAT STEERS AT 1929 AMERICAN ROYAL SHOW 

Fed and shown by Dan D. Casement, Manhattan, Kans. Bred by Matador Land & Cattle 

Company, Denver, Colo. Bought by Fred Harvey Eating Houses. Sold by John Clay & 

Company at $21 per cwt. Average Weight 1,022 lbs. 



When you have stock to ship 

or want stockers and feeders ; 

Cattle — Hogs — Sheep — 

You will find it to your benefit to 

deal with — 



LIVE STOCK COMMISSION 
KANSAS CITY STOCK YARDS 

We also have our own completely equipped offices at Chicago, Omaha, St. Joseph, St. 
Louis, Denver, Sioux City, Fort Worth, Ogden, St. Paul. 



Page :i6Ci 



The New Yorker 



Souvenir 

JOHN is a typical student in general science, that is if 
any student in general science can ever be typical or 
even half-typical in these days, with good liquor selling 
so high. 

But to resort to the discussion. John is saving a little 
missive which he received through the college post office 
the first semester. It is a quaint letter, and he has tied 
it with blue ribbon in a package containing snapshots 
of the girls back home and a picture of three violets 
taken at sunrise. 

And every few days John undoes the pale blue ribbon, 
gazes at the snapshots, waters the little violets with 
tears from his dew-rimmed eyes, and then unfolds the 
letter and sits down to read once more that sweet message 
of hope and confidence. Once more his courage is re- 
newed, and inspired by the cordiality of the letter, he is 
once more a man. 

In case you, reader, have parted with the little 
message of cordial inspiration which every general 
science student received, the New Yorker section wishes 
to quote a few paragraphs to which you may return ever 
and anon for that friendly feeling, as did that typical 
boy John, or Jake or Ike, or whatever his name was in 
paragraph one. 



From the letter: "... We always have with us a 
small percentage of students who habitually neglect 
college duties and who attempt to excuse this by allega- 
tions of very doubtful validity. 

On page 88 of the catalogue the following paragraph 
occurs: 

'Any student who is found to be persistently in- 
attentive to his college work is at once temporarily 
suspended by his dean, and reported to the President for 
permanent suspension ..." 

This is to warn all students in the Division of 
General Science, who are not here for the purpose of 
giving serious attention to college work and who are 
habitually absent or tardy in respect to attendance, who 
allege illness when the condition of their health inter- 
feres with nothing but college work, that they will be 
promptly suspended when conditions seem to justify it 
and be allowed to make their explanations afterwards. 
The college is a pleasant place to be but its primary 
purpose still is consistent and regular attention to the 
subjects to which the student is assigned. 

Yours most cordially, 

J. T. WiLLARD, Dean 

Division of General Science" 




pRiiD ALDiiRT Shannon, wull Known Campus Cyclist, Leavks a Rhstricted Area Mori; or 
Hastily, Followed by a N/Lember oi thic Royal Order of Moppers and Broomi rs. 



Page 367 



The New York 



er 




Almost 

an Aggie Tradition 



The standard of good foods and 
unfailing service set years ago by 
the "First and Last" has increased 
its popularity and patronage until 
the visit to the "Chance" after the 
party, dance or show has become an 
accepted custom. 



The First and Last 
Chance Cafe 

112 S. Fourth Dial 2960 

"In Every Respect a Ked Seal Place" 



Nu Style Shop 



DUSENBURY'S 
Candy Shop 

Fountain Lunch 

109 S. Fourth Street 

Phone 3332 



Phone 3912 1110 Moro 

ELITE CLEANERS & DYERS 

Al. Schmiedeler Dan Blanchard 



Have Your 


Shoes Rebui 
at 


It 




OLSON'S 

Electric Shoe Shops 
Down Town 
107 North Fourth St. 


Aggieville 
12281.2 Moro 



GOLD MEDAL BAKERY 

610 North 12th St. 
Manhattan Kansas 



Ofticc Phone 2037 



Res. Phone 3012 



J. W. EVANS, M. D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist 

Glasses Fitted Scientifically 

Office over First National Bank 

Manhattan, Kansas 



The New Yorker 



Ariti-Kitnball Election 

Who gets the Pie, you or I or Beta Theta Pi? 

Who gets the you or I or Solon Kimball? 

For three years it was thought by a few people on the 
hill that the Theodoric party had been created so that 
the Betas and Kimball could make use of their Pi Kappa 
Delta ability. And then in the still of the night "The 
Voice" came to Zek Richardson and said that the Power 
of Theodoric should be no more. The next day he called 
those who he knew had assumed, some time before the 
"no more Kimball attitude." Sunday the Pi Phis were 
honored with a meeting at which" the Voice" presided. 
It is interesting to note that all the Greeks of Fairchild 
Avenue were there and the Betas were seriously consider- 
ing some new neighbors. But to go on with the election. 
The most interesting feature of the Betas was the Gum 
campaign which they so religiously conducted. One of 
the boys sisters, who works at Kresses won the sticky 
stuff at a recent gum-chewing orgy. But try as they 
could they couldn't "stick" it out. 

The Chi Omega — Pi Phi Basketball Game 

The Chio quintet overwhelmed the Pi Phi team 
last night by a close score of 14-15 after being extended 
to 15 extra rest periods to give the lucky strickers and 
fatima girls enough time out to finish the game. 

The game was fast from the very start, and kept the 
crowd in a uproar during the entire fracas. As many 
as seven spectators were in the gymnasium at the time. 

Little "Pil" Havley, Chio forward, brought the 
crowd to its feet when she ran the full length of the court 
without stopping once. Sparr also made a nice run 
but the play didn't count, for the referee had already 
blown his whistle for tea. 




Visitor: "And what is this odd odor on \()ur 
campus? 

Studu: "Oh, )ust some agriculturalist close about." 



Cook and Heat 
With 

"Natures Fuel 



The 

Kansas Pipe Line & 

Gas Company 

Heat It With Gas 



Old Grads 
New Grads 
Faculty and 
Students 

have for several years known where to go 
for their motoring requirements. 

We'll sell you a new Chevrolet, a good 
used car, an Exide battery, a set of Good- 
rich Silvertown tires, an Alemite grease 
job, a change of Quaker State Oil, a tire 
repair, a wash and polish or a "What have 
you." 

In fact 

EVERY MOTORING SER\1CE 

Brewer Motor Company 

316-22 Houston 

Do We Believe in the Aggies? 

Ask Us! 



The New Yorker 







* 



fSgpM;. 



Mr 



BUILD A HOME FIRST 

When you build you want good material, good service 
and appreciative treatment. 

The buyers of this space offer you the above mentioned 

Quality Material 

and 

Service with a Smile 

We Also Sell the 

Best Grades of Coal 

MINED IN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS 

Golden Belt Lumber Co. Ramey Bros. Lumber Co. 

Lambert Lumber Co. Burgner-Bowman-Matthew^s Lumber Co. 



Page 



The New Yorker 



YOU CAN'T PARK ON THE CAMPUS ROARED 
ROTHBERT, harshly. 

"But janitor," came back the pulchritudinous Polly, 
"surely you will allow me to leave my machine for the 
once on these confines. Must I become so frightfully 
frank as to explain that my gown was enmeshed in the 
gears and now scarcely covers my ankles, so that I must 
ride as near the classroom as possible?" 

"And as for any possible rasping of the mechanism 
which might disturb students, I have checkmated you 
on that. Every tipple, every tholepin and every cotter 
key I have lubricated with an oil from the very center 
of this year's gusher, the cream of the crop. Can you 
longer resist me?" concluded Polly, the willing victim 
of a thousand affairs. 

"Nay, nay," chortled the villainous Rothbert, "I 
can not resist you, but by all means get that machine off 
the campus. We janitors of Kansas State have a reputa- 
tion for being hardhearted, and I can be. no traitor to 
tradition. "You can not park here!" 

... He sprawled face forward on the gravelly drive- 
way. Pretty Polly had punctured his ego with a ball 
from the musket she carried in the inside pocket for just 
such emergencies. 



The Kappa Who Had Kheutnatisin 

One of the drollest tales of the year is told concerning 
a Kappa. 

Suffering from a severe-in-one-so-young attack of 
rheumatism, she was indeed in a bad way. The sisters 



had placed her in a private bed, occupied by only 16 
others, and were giving her all of the attention they 
could muster. 

Even then her pain was almost unbearable. The 
college medic was consulted, and advised hot water 
bottles and perfect quiet. The girls took his advice in 
the best possible way, and put ice packs on the poor 
child, pummeled her torso thoroughly, and played the 
radio. 

Still there was little change. Every movement be- 
came an agony to the girl lying there in the white-walled 
room, looking at the picture of the Madonna and child 
above the foot of her bed. At every vibration of the 
floor her face twinged as racking pains rent her beautiful 
body. It seemed that this could not go on long. She 
would be forced to give up her secluded scholarly life 
and go over where her grandparents and baby sister 
seemed to be waiting with outstretched arms. 

Close by the bedside was a somber black instrument. 
It jingled and one of the girls answered. A foolish 
Sigma Nu had called for a date with the rheumatic 
Kappa. She roused sufficiently to understand. 

"Tell him" she whispered, "Tell him that I have 
rheumatism," and she sank back on the pillow. 

That night as the dark of evening hushed over the 
Kappa house, and the pale moon shone wanly in the 
heavens, she passed out of the front door and went to 
the varisty with another man. The Sigma Nu saw her 
at the hall, dancing very torpidly, and he found it hard 
to believe that she had been suffering from rheumatism. 
Her recovery had almost been incredible. 




Kino Geauque and his Cohorts Prepare to Fall Upon the Unsuspecting Foe, the C'ampis Parki :r. 
The Power of This Heartless Monarch Cannot be Stayed, His Wrath Cannot be Appeased. 



Page 371 



The New Yorker 



Three Good Kelsons Why You Should 
Trade At 

Duckwairs Stores 



1. — Because of the outstanding reputation of 
giving quality and service. 

2. — Because of the attractive prices we offer you 
merchandise at, due to our store's purchas- 
ing power. 

3. — Because your business is appreciated and 
solicited. 



A. L. Duckwall Stores 

Down Town and Ag^ieville 



FRANK H. WALTERS 



PLUMBING 

and 
TINWORK 



612 North 12th 



Phone 3361 



Pet Depart??2ent 

Editor' s Note: This space, or one just like it, is devoted 
to our readers who may be livestock or poultry fanciers. 
Dr. Zilch is noted for his animal analyses. Anvone 
bothered with pre-war stock should confer at once with 
this specialist. 




Dear Zilch: This is a photograph showing my 
mascot, the Jayhawk. He is in a very droopy condition. 
Can you suggest any possible succor? 

Lawrence. 

Dear Lawrence: There are several succors I might 
suggest. Why try to keep this pest alive, anyway? Is 
your "insurance" questionable? I note that most of the 
thatch on this mutt is missing. If it has been clipped, 
the fact might explain his weakness. (Remember what 
Delilah did.) 

Z. 




Dr. Whirk Zilch: Here is a picture of my tiger 
which has been a constant anxiety to me in past years. 
He assumes this position all the time. What can the 
matter be? M. U. 

Dear M. U.: The picture of your tiger shows that 
he is lying down. Try calling him Phainting Phil to 
see if he responds. Or Lon Chaney. From the lankness 
of your cat, it would seem that something was missing. 
Perhaps there are too many fiddle players on the Big Six. 

Zilch, D. V. M. 



The New York 



er 



Coe Quality 
SEEDS & FEEDS 

Have been Sold Since 1002 

D. O. COE SEED & GRAIN CO. 



Office Topeka, Warehouse 

119E. bth KANSAS 212-16 Kan. Ave. 



N YGREN^ 


s 


FOOTWEAR 




and 




HOSIERY 




1101/2 S. Fourth Street 





HOLMSTROM FEED & SEED CO. 
Feed, Grain and Field Seeds 



311 S. 2nd St. 



Manhattan, Kansas 
DIAL 3421 



Feeds, Seeds and Flour 

Feeds mixed on orders 

Chick Starting Mash Laying Mash 

Big 10 Hog Feed Big 12 Pig Feed 

Tankage, Peanut Meal 



END ACOTT 


'S 




BOOK STORE 






FAVORS, PARTY 






DECORATIONS 






321 Poyntz 


Dia 


I 3286 



The 
WAREHAM 



RATES 

$1.50 to $3.00 

Coffee Shop De Luxe in Connection 



The 
GILLETT 



RATES 

$1.25 to $2.00 

Finest Dining Room in Central Kansas 



Aggie Altimni and Alumnae and Their Friends Always Welcon/e 

Operated by 

« « « FRED BOONE & SONS » 



» » 



The New Yorker 



Greetings, K - Aggies 



A Step Forward 

Theatre goers sitting before a Vitaphone production hearing 
and seeing its marvels unfolded before them on the screen give 
heed not only to the ultimate result holding them enthralled. 
They are entertained and amused as the elements of drama, music 
and comedy come to their ears and eyes through the medium 
developed and brought to perfection by the Warner Bros. 

Sound pictures have come to stay and thus is fulfilled the 
hopes of hundreds of Miller theatre patrons. Sound pictures 
are the outgrowth of the radio, and actually represent wedding 
of the radio and the movie, bringing with it the greatest type of 
entertainment the world has yet had. 

Each theatre has a distinct influence in the civic life of the 
community. Each striving with every facility at its command 
for better pictures, each serving the public, each bringing good 
cheer and happiness. 

And the Miller Theatre pledges that every evening you spend 
here shall be an enjoyable one, sweeping you away with a magical 
romance of audible pictures tales, delighting you with its novelty 
talking presentations, thrilling you with its music, making the 
hours spent here pleasant ones indeed. 



Miller Theatre 

"FOR BIGGER AND BETTER 
ENTERTAINMENT" 

DuANE Allingham Mrs. R. R.Jersey 

Resident Manager Secretary-Treasurer 



Page 37 i 



The New Yorker 



THE ART CRAFT 

Collegiate Printers 

for fifteen years 



/ 



Dial 2065 203-A Poyntz 



You Need Not Look Further 
Ifs Here! 



The bargains that make your allow- 
ance go farther. Your check from 
home goes farther and lasts longer 
at Wards. When you are down 
town, come in and see. 



MONTGOMERY WARD & COMPANY 



The New Yorker 



MANHATTAN 
FRUIT and 

VEGETABLE 
COMPANY 

Located At 

PERRY PACKING 
COMPANY 



We handle Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 
the year round' ' 






Code of Etb cs 

Professor C. E. Rogers, head of Department of Jour- 
nalism, is writing a book. What the name of the book 
IS or what is contained other than on the first page is 
of little interest to the readers. On the first page, the 
head has set forth what he considers to be prerequisites 
for journalism, and it is that which we wish to impart 
to you. 

Prerequisites for Journalisiii 

1. All exams must be taken during a small not that has 
been especially imported for the occasion. (McKinney 
and Schmidler being the riot.) 

2. Learn to take a squelching as well as give one. 

3. Scent gossip before it happens. 

4. Only the "hide and seek"method of typewriting is 
permitted. All machines are worked by invisible 
pedals. 

5. Develop a handwriting that can be read only by you. 

6. Be able to pass a post-graduate course in bluffing. 

7. Greatest of these, be able to answer not more than 
two questions on a Davs News test. 

8. Make up your mind that you'll only get a D in Adver- 
tising and that you'll be called a "sissy" if you get 
above a C in anything else. 



Manhattan, Kansas 



Dial 4311 




"TiiLL Mil, My Man, were You Badly Lacerated 
[N This Unfortunate Accident?" 

"Yeh, and I was all Cut Up, too." 



The New Yorker 




'-^ Furnishmpf Fraternities 



is an important branch of Keith Service — evidenced by 
many handsome fraternity houses throughout the 
Southwest. 

Whether the requirements call simply for refurnishing, 
or the designing and installing of a complete interior, 
the experienced care and skill exercised to achieve the 
most artistic effect — unswerving reliability of price — 
and completeness of service — have created widespread 
confidence in our ability, merchandise and methods. 



We cordially invite consultation regarding your 
decorative problems however small or large they 
may he. Every modern facility is at your service 
for furnishing the most simple or elaborate frater- 
nity house or home . . . artistically and economi- 
cally. 



RoDeitKei1h'<s?!St'§.^ 



13th and Baltimore 



Kansas Citv 




JacKSprat 

FOOD PRODUCTS 



HIGH QUALITY 

Quality is foremost in the Jack Sprat line. An enviable reputation has been established 
for these excellent products. 

MODERATE PRICES 

Since 75/r> of the people purchase moderately priced merchandise. Jack Sprat products are 
sold to satisfy this vast majority of purchasers. 

ECONOMY 

On account of the High Quality and reasonable prices "Jack Sprat" has become the"Friend 
of Economy." 

LETTS - MELICK GROCER CO. 

Manhattan, Kansas 



The New York 



er 



College Men 

Everywhere agree that Hart Schaff- 
ner & Marx styles are correct to 
the last detail. 



We are always glad to show the newest 
styles. 



HAL McCORD 

Manhattan 



WALK'OVER 

Shoes for Men and Women 



STYLE LEADERSHIP 



College Shoe Store 

1216 Moro Aggieville 

Dial 3295 



A ISSew Drug Store in the Modern Manner 



The 

Uptown 

Palace 

7C4 

Manhattan 

Avenue 



'v'' 




"^ 


3 




g^l 


C 




I 


5^^^^ 


^___^^^^^ 


1 


"o rt^ 


^kSSj 


I^mI 




^n||n| 


Wi 




j^^^ii^r 




!H[^^^ 


iHfllhoS 


' W^iBS^ 


«f-r 




^j^k^r^gAftn^ 




i^RRMIHI 


H^^^^HKu 




fl 




w^^^ 




p:^p 


9^H 


W^^^^ 


s 




^isS 


■r^; 


V 


.' ^-S'^^^S 


m^KmSk 


1 




s 


s 


M 


B 



The 

Downtown 
Palace 

112 South 

4th 

Street 



Page 378 



The New Yorker 







tuirkeii ir, restricted area 









:po'/fi! Ihal you have exceeded the speed 






Af<.« drn',r,g recklessly |^^ (^P P^^ M f^ O 5 E. S 



«/.|'r /l,J.< *t'."I refolded 




~ 'X" 

1^57 p Date p 



-^A'^ETH^ T^H^T^- SEV- 
ERAL LATER WITH Tn& 

^0^015 tries ro "^aise: 

T>4^(R SOCIAL STAND/ NG- 



^ -^MTfc^ s<:>f=T BALL 
(HT^AA^^ - TEA IS I 
^eKv^j> BerweEN iUM(lMG5 




T(fVA^rr> 



iCAMPU6 MONSTROSITIES 



I 



A'^U 



Tayc 5~9 



The Netv Yorker 




DIAMOND 
1 ENGAGEMENT 

RINGS \ ' i 

Orange Blossom Wedding Rings 

SauARi> Deai^ Jeweler^ 

The House of Perfect Diamonds 



Food For Thought 



ud 



FOOD FOR ATHLETES 



Always ask for 

HONEY BRAND HAMS and BACON 

and 

HYGRADE SAUSAGES 



Manufactured By 

HYGRADE FOOD PRODUCTS CORP. 

Chas. Wolff Packing Co. 

Division 
Topeka, Kansas 



The Misanthropes 

(Three friends are in an Aggieville barroom, indicat- 
ing school is in progress. They discuss — ) 

Ethelbert: Drinking this coke reminds me. 'Tis 
but on the morrow that there is an election in yon hall 
of Anderson. 

Chorus: Whattahahell? Another election? 

Ethel: Yea, another election. It is the thirty-ninth 
this semester and my brain is becoming weary of the 
responsibility of suffrage, tsk, tsk. WAITER, hey 
damn you, BRING ME 'NOTHER GLASS APOP. 

Algernon: I beseech you, friend, tell of the election. 

Eth. : Okav, Butch, in jussa minute. HEY WAITER, 
WHY THE HELL DON'T THIS LIMEADE FOAM? 

Perthy: But the election. 

Chorus: Yea, the 'lection. 

Eth.: Stave off, I'll acquaint you with the detail. 
Tomorrow, we the student body, are to elect three men 
out of our mist, misht — 

Perthy: You mean migdst. 

E. : We are to name the guysh we think are the most 
collegiate in ish whole school. 

Chorus: Whashu mean, collegiate, huh? 

E.: Why, guys 'at can get away with the most. 
Guys what can cut most classes, and crash most dances, 
and stay on their feet longest, and love the women the 
hardest, and can spread a line, and — 

Algy: Hush up. We got the idea. 

Perth: Yeah. Same old stuff. Jussa pop'larity 
contesh, thassall. Ye Gods. Pardon, me boysh, I 
meant doggone. Guessh I was so mad I didn't care what 
I said. All the guys we ever elect are jush shosen for 
popularity. And they think it's an honor. I guessh it 
ish, a honor, all right, all right, all — 

E.: You're blamed right it's an honor. Jussh think 

(Continued on page }82~) 




Left to right: 

G. Gorrell Joe College Biles 

Alex Jack College Barneck 

James Wilson John College Pratt 

The above pictures were taken just before the occur- 
rence of the above bit from life. 



Page 3S0 



The New Yorker 



The Complirmnts 

of a 

Friend 



Aggie Hardware and 
Electric Co* 



Student Supplies 
Edison Lamps 



1205 Moro 



Phone 2993 




Gifts of Gifts 

For The Graduate 

No matter what she says she hopes, 
down deep in her heart, that her gradu- 
ation gift will be a watch; a cunning, 
lovely thing of gold, in a box marked 
Dooley's. 



ELGIN 

ILLINOIS BENRUS 

WATCHES 



PAUL DOOLEY 

Jeweler 
AGGIEVILLE 




E^iiTii 



^^ 
15 
15 
15 

T5 
15 
15 
15 
15 



Grasselli Spray and Dust 
Products 

are certified as to quality and uniformity and 

are preferred by many of the leading growers. 

GRASSELLI GRADE ^ 

Arsenate of Lead Powder 

Calcium Arsenate Powder 

Bordeaux Mixture Powder 

Line Sulphur Solution 

Dry Line Sulphur 

Oil Emulsion 

Monohydrated Copper Sulphate 

Casein Spreader 

Sulphate of Nicotine 

The Grasselli Chemical Co. 

h/corpon/teJ 
FcHuidcd LSV) CLEN'ELAND, OHIO 



51 

5r 
5r 

5r 

5r 



Grasselli Grade 

C4 Standard 9/c/d High for 91 ^cars 



Page SSI 



The New Yorker 



Hotel c5r ay 

12th and Baltimore 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



i4 



^m 



iiSf 









■■■■-wiri-ii.- 



LOCATED 

in the Retail Shopping and 

Theatre district on Kansas 

City's most exclusive street — 

Baltimore Avenue 



Catering to the most exacting 
trade at moderate rates 

Fire Proof — European Plan 



RATES 

Without Bath - . - - $1.50 
With Shower Bath - - 1.75 

With Tub Bath - $2.00 to 3.00 

Gentlemen's Turkish Bath 
Department in Connection 



Operated and Under the Personal Supervision of 

F. A. BENSON and SAM WILSON 



When You Buy cm AutomobiU 

BUY 

A WORLDS "CHAMPION" 

MOTOR CAR 

STUDEBAKER-ERSKINE 

W. E. BROWN 
MOTOR CO. 

Distributor 
Salina Kansas 



BRANCHES 



Colby 



Manhattan 



(Continued from pa^e 3S0') 

. . . Picture in the papers, 'neverything. We're gonna 
call em Joe College and John and Jack. 

A.: John and Jack what? 

E.: College. BOY, HURRY THAT BROMO 
SHELTZER. 

(At this time, Perthy, who has been quietly munch- 
ing an apple for some minutes, suddenly smiles:) Hey! 
Whoopee! Boop-boop — 

Chorus: HEY WAITER, DIDN'T YOU TELL |US 
THAT STUFF WAS TAME? 

Perthy: Aw shut up. I jush got an idea. 

Al.: I've got an idea you're a 

E.: Hush up. Wotcha gotta say, huh? 

P.: Lisshen, fellows. Ain't we all shick of thish 
popularity stuff? 

Chorus: Yea, bo. 

Per.: An ain't you, Ethelbert, a Delt, Scabbard 'n 
Blade, Sigma Tau, a Hamp, an a 

Eth.: Yeh, and more. 

Perth: An ain't you Algy, a Sig Ep an 

Algernon: Six other things. 

(Continued to page }98^ 



The New Yorker 




Bardwell & Bardwell 



Twenty Years in Real Estate 
and Loan Business 



Courteous and efficient salesman avail- 
able at all times to show city, suburban 
or farm properties. 

Money to loan on good agricultural 
land anywhere in Kansas. 

Money to loan on Manhattan city or 
suburban properties. We will help you 
buy or build. 



Insurance and Bonds of All Kinds 
Legal Papers Executed 



Prompt Sen 



ice 




for that 

NEW HOME 
MID-CONTINENT 

100% 

Pure House Paint 

Highest Grade Varnishes 

Interior Gloss Hy-Glo-Lac 

Will Renew the 

Old Home, Too 

MID-CONTINENT 

Paint & Lacquer Mfg. Co. 

1921 Central St. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

HA. 3355 

"There is a Mid-Co>ithietit Finish for Every Purpose" 



Walter J. Wilson 

President 

S. M. Breitweiser 
Vice-President 



Lee M. Eg an 

Vice-President 

W. W. Cloughley 

Secretary and Treasurer 



For Universal Good Prices, Good Fills 
and Courteous Treatment 

Consign To and Buy Through 

Wilson, Egan 8z Co. 

Kansas Cit\ Stock Yards 

Its Keputiition is Your Protection 
Its Experience Your Cuin\nitee 



The New Yorker 



D 



Alw^ays 

Distinctive Entertainment 

The 

MARSHALL 

Western Electric Sound System 

The 

W GREATER ^ g- 

arehaM 

R, C. A, SOUND SYSTEM 
Glen W* Dickinsons Theatres, Inc» 



Pane SSJ, 



The New Yorker 




LET GOOD CLOTHES 

BE VISIBLE 

REMINDERS THAT 

YOU ARE READY 

FOR THE NEXT STEP 
UPWARD IN THE 
BUSINESS WORLD 



TWOJSTORES 
DOWNTOWN CAMPUS SHOP 



A. V. LAUNDRY 

Offers You Careful Service 
WE DO DRY CLEANING 

We Call and Deliver 
1219 Moro Dial 2323 



The Thrifty and Discriminating 
Steivard will Patronise 

The Perry Packing Co* 

Our retail department is one of the very few 
exclusive poultry and egg stores in the United 
States. It has been given a leading write-up in 
The United States Egg Magazine. 



Foot of Poyntz 



Dial 2531 



The Pioneer Mortgage 
Company 



Kansas Oklahoma 

Farm Loans 



Lowest Rates — Liberal Options 
Prompt Service — 5-7-10 Years 

Mulvanc Building Topcka, Kansas 



The Nen' Yorker 



What will the future bring? 1 



T~^VERY young man or woman of today wonders 
-'-^ what tomorrow will mean for him or her. 
Whether you measure your success in dollars and 
cents, or in contentment and the respect of those 
in the community in which you live, there just is 
one answer — the answer is THRIFT. 

To practice this golden virtue is the only assurance 
that you will reap the reward to which your educa- 
tion entitles you. 

In appreciation of the wonderful work that the 
Kansas State Agricultural College and her students 
are doing for our State, the Associated Banks of 
Manhattan take pleasure in extending this message 
on "Better Citizenship" to you through the 1930 
Royal Purple. 



First National Bank Union National Bank 

Manhattan State Bank , College State Bank 

The Manhattan Clearing House 
Association 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



The New Yorker 



J. C. Swift, Prendent Chas. D. Henry, Vice-President 

SWIFT & HENRY 

Live Stock Commission Company 

Our Own House Rooms 142 to 146 Phones: 

South St. Joseph „.„,„, „ .... Main 5290 and 5291 

'^ rirst Moor hxchange Duilding 



Stock Yards Station 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



Compliments of 

The Champion Coated Paper 
Company 

♦♦Hamilton, Ohio** 

Makers of the paper on which this, the 
1930 Royal Purple, is printed 

Manufacturers of fine coated and uncoated papers 
and cardboards over a million pounds a day 



The New Yorker 



Vocational Expert Compares 
Income of Veterinarian 



Dr. Chester Milton Sanford, vocational guid- 
ance expert, spoke recently to an audience 
largely of students at the Kansas City-Horner 
Conservatory. He told of the efforts to eliminate 
overcrowding the various occupations, among 
them law and civil engineering. He cited 
the surpris'ng fact that veterinarians are in ex 
treme demand, and earn an average of nearly 
$1,000 yearly more than physicians. 



The Jensen-Salsbery 

Laboratories, Inc. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Thinking of 

Furniture ? 

Ask your dealer to show you 
the HELMEKS products 



The Helmers Mfg. Co 

Manufacturers and Wholesale 
Distributors 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Factory at Leavenworth, Kansas 



'Fifty-five Years in tin lurnitiire Business" 



Est. 
1 832 

Originators 
of Academic 

Outfits in the U. S. 

Correctness Assured 



GOWNS - HOODS - CAPS 

for all degrees 

Cotrell & Leonard 
College Dept. 

Albany 

N. y. 



A. Y, McDonald 

Mfg. Company 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Bathe in McDonald's tubs and showers 
once a day. 

Visit the doctor twice a year. 

Then your friends won't be 
regusted with you. 



PoflC SHH 



The New Yorker 




mafce your 
Portwiti* 



Official Photographer for the ''Royal Pur pit 



Pane SS'J 



The New Yorker 



Success to You 



THE BASIS FOR SUCCESSFUL FEEDING IS 

CORN and COTTONSEED MEAL 



We Make "CHICK ASH A QUALITY" Meal 

Chick-A-Sha Cotton 
Oil Company 

KANSAS CITY, MO. CHICKASKA, OKLA. 




EMBLEM OF SATISFACTION 



Buick Sales and 
Service 



Manhattan Motors Co. 

311-317 Houston 
MANHATTAN - - - . Kansas 



Pep 

Pi Epsilon Pi was founded at Malaria Crossing, 
Mississippi, by a crew of shell-shocked civil war de- 
serters who had nothing better to do and were bordering 
on melancholia. This year most of the members had a 
had case of it. (Not Elinor Glynn's kind). The idenity 
of the order was temporarily lost during the guerrillia 
warfare that raged in the south at that time, but after 
the smoke had cleared away the whole gang assumed 
the name of P. E. P. (pepless ever pepless), and laugh- 
ingly called themselves a fraternity, for promoting en- 
thusiasm at athletic games. 

Motto: Baccus and the Bull. 
Ambition: Absolutely none. 

This year's chapter is characterized by a mob of 
would be social men. Their annual varsity, which by 
the way was a necessity and not a pleasure and was put 
on to raise eighty-six dollars to pay for damages done 
at the K. U. game. The dance was a typical Wampus 
Cat affair, which would have been a credit to any town 
over 453 population and the list of attendants was not 
published until the S. G. A. had met. It was rumored 
that some of the boys didn't know that there was a 
dance until they saw the notice in the Collegian. 

At the present the members are organizing a bridge 
tournament, for the members, which will start next fall. 
A platform will be made, next to that of the band and 
the Kitties will entertain themselves during the game. 
Instead of exerting themselves between the halves by 
giving a stunt, the crowd will be cordially invited to 
attend the bridge. Reserve seats will be sold. 




Twice Sisters Under A Double Bond 



I'ayi; 300 



The New Yorker 



SIXES 



EIGHTS 



DODGE BROTHERS 

'Luxury — Dependability — Economy' 



W* H. Imes Automobile 
Company 



THE CAPITAL IRON WORKS CO. 

Established 1876 
TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Structural Steel 
Ornamental Iron Work 

Power Plant Equipment and Supplies 



ANNA DALE 
Fancy Quality 


if 

are not 




JO-ANDY 

Standard Qualit\' 




you 


han 


dling 






these br 


mds, we so 


icit 


y*. 


ur 






inqui 


ry 








Canned Fruits, 
Canned Milk, Pei 


Canned Veget 
nut Butter, Cei 
Coffee, etc. 


ihl 

eal 


es. Syrups, 
s. Gelatine, 


Thk 


DISTRIBUTORS 

Topiik'A WnoLi;sAi.ii Groci 


RY 


Company 



WAREHAM HOTEL GARAGE 

Manhattan's "One ,Slot^ Senice Station ' 

Service Car 

1 ires and Tubes 

Oils and Gasoline 

Repairing 

Accessories 

Cjreasing 

Electrical Service 

TODD MOTOR CO. 

"We Never Close" 



DE SOTO MOTOR CARS 

Product of Chrysler 

SAM MILLER 

Auto Exchange and Garage 

Manhattan, Kansas 

New and Used Cars Bought and Sold 

115 S. Third Street Phone 2178 



Buver and Seller 



CATTLE 



SHEEP 



Crider Bros. Com. Co, 

Tele. Main 5109 Kansas Citv Stock Y.irc 

ESTABLISHED 1886 

lV>ndcd For \ ouv Protection 
C.ipit.il .iiid Surplus $50,000 



/'(!</<■ .;.'(/ 



The New Yorker 



SERVICE . . . 'We Give If 






The Long Oil Company 

An All Kansas Corporation 
General Office Manhattan, Kansas 



.^:" 
•■»*■*■ 





■ l IIHl li 



LINCOLN 




FORDSON 



Cars - Trucks - Tractors 

Pleasure Service Economy 

Walter E. Moore 

Dealer 
Manhattan, Kansas 



THE PARADE 

OF THE 

COLLEGE ANNUALS 





ANNUALLY the Royal Purple marches 
in stately review — -recording the 
achievements of the past year — making 
permanent chronicles of friendships and 
associations that future years will never 
efface. 

The 30 Book proudly leads the parade^ 
and stretching into the dim distance of 
yesterdays we vision the Year Books of 
other years. 

College Days — the happiest and most 
eventful in our span of life. 



As Leadership has made this Year Book outstanding in its editorial production 

so has Leadership made the hHavens Printing organization worthy of note in 

producing College Annuals of finest craftsmanship in the printing art. It has 

given us the utmost pleasure to again have had the opportunity to 

cooperate in the creation of your annual. 



FINE PRINTING 



KANSAS CITY 



MISSOURI 



I 



S('ri'/<i' lu/.u'i/ 0// {' iiilci-stiiihl'ni^ 



'% 



The New Yorker 



w. A. A. 

The W. A. A. was founded in a girl's dormitory in 
Peoria. The bunch that assisted in the organization in 
this locality was the "K" fraternity. Their main con- 
tribution was thelendingof their motto, which is: "Not 
a hope in a carload." The order consists mostly of 
country girls who are as pure as snow (some of which 
has drifted). The social standing of the organization is 
at present horizontal, and the rise is very sluggish, 
amounting to almost nothing. Pledges are required to 
lift a huge dumb bell unassisted, learn all the songs, 
pass words, and creeds of the fraternity, and to memorize 
verbatim "Fascinating Womanhood." Once a week, 
Pat Kimball gives a lecture on "How to get the man of 
your choice and hold him." The group singing for each 
meeting is beautifully conducted by Pauline Samuel. She 
has submitted the following songs for publication: 

"W. A. A." 
(Tune, Jingle Bells) 

W. A. A., W. A. A., yes that is our name. 

We're every one having fun; 
Always playing the ga — ame. 

We make the team, earn our points. 
And play till we're sore in the joints; 

We may get fatter, but it doesn't matter, '} 

For we get there just the same. 

When the girls are entertaining rushees 
they sing this little song: 
"Come Out and Play." 
(Tune, School Days) 
Play time, fun time 

In the grand ole' out doors. 
Hockey and swimming and tennis, too; 

Come out and play with us, each of you. 
All sorts of sports indeed we'll find — 

Win them or not we'll never mind; 
Fun for us all and all for fun 

When we are in the W. A. A." 

As the last two lines are sung the girls all join hands 
as a token of the common bond which exists between 
them. 

W. A. A. has been on the campus several years. No 
one knows how long because the girls haven't cut enough 
ice in campus social circles. Mortar Board is their closest 
rival, but when they failed to get a corner on selling the 
last issue of the Brown Bull they gave up in despair. It 
is noised about that unless conditions rapidly turn foi- 
the better, it is the secret ambition of this group to 
change their motto to this: "Although Nichols is her 
only gym, yet she has athlete's foot." 



East Side. West Side - - 



All around the town, you've eaten 
Chappel's Ice Cream, in the leading drug 
stores, confectioneries, restaurants. You've 
commented, even as you have heard those 
about you comment . . . 

"Delicious . . . Satisfying .... Such 

Smoothness . . . This ice creum truly is 

different!" 



CHAPPELL CREAMERY 



118 N. Fourth 



Phone 2587 



Meet You 


at the— 


Colk 


^ge Canteen 




Where There's Lots 




of Delicious Pies 




and Pastries 


HOME 


COOKED FOODS 


Op, 


x)sitc NkIh)Is Qiww 



The New York 



er 




June Layton 



and hi 



Wareham Ballroom Orcliestra 

- — Playing at'the — 

Beautiful 

WAREHAM BALLROOM 

''The Pride of the School" 

Catering to Distinctive Parties — 

— and the better varsities 



Page 301, 



The New Yorker 



OUTSTANDING in COLLEGIATE 
SOCIAL ACTIVITY 




HOTEL MUEHLEBACH 



Not only during the school year but 
especially through the summer va- 
cation period. 

You'll find the hot summer months 
are successfully combated in the 
Muehlebach's dining rooms with in- 
vigorating, refreshing — 

CHILLED, WASHED AIR 



Daily Dancing and Amusement in the 
Famed Plantation Grill 

— at Luncheon, Dinner and After-Theater Supper 



Nationally-Known Recording 

Dance Bands in the Grill 

the Year Around 



3 DINING ROOMS AND CAFES 

Cafe Trianon, Plantation Grill 
and Coffee Shop 




KANSAS CITY, MO. 



The New Yorker 



Exclusive 
Styles 




Those of discriminating taste prefer our 
models to all others, recognizing that in- 
definable touch of genius which bespeaks 
style at its best. 



The Style Shop 

Where Styles Start 
404 Povntz Ave. 



Meyer Blanke 
Company 



Creamery — Dairy — Milk Distributors 
■ — Cheese Factory — Ice Cream Machin- 
ery and Supplies. 



Everything But The Cow 



1311 West 13th St. 



Kansas City, Mo. 



Gavit & Co., Inc. 



Established 1840 



Steel and Copper Plate 
Engraving 



90 Years 
of Service 



Wedding Announcements 

Commercial Stationery 

Diplomas 

65 HUDSON AVE. ALBANY, N. Y. 



Vaye S'JS 



The New Yorker 



Consolation 

(The scene is the den of Mary P. Van Zile, any day of 
the week. Reading from left to right on the next in- 
stalment of a continued story, is none other than the 
dean herself. A faint, timid little knock is heard at the 
door which is offstage.) 

Dean: Cuuuuuahhhm eeeeen. (Very musically). 

(The door opens ever so slightly and a little college 
girl slips into the room and slides into a chair the dean 
indicates regally.) 

Dean: Hoowe doo yooue doo. Haaawaut cahhn I 
deww for youahou? (With a silver-toned rising inflec- 
tion.) 

Girl: Oh Dean, Oh Dean, Oh Dean. 

Dean: Tell Deany, dear. (With anxiety peeping out 
from her lorngette.) 

Girl: It's too awful. (Blubbering.) 

Dean: You musn't keep anything from deahh old 
deany, chihuld. (Points finger at girl very chastisingly.) 

Girl: I didn't know. Oh Dean, I swear I didn't 
know. (Grasps forehead in a clutch of the hand.) 

Dean: Come ohhhun, tell deahhny. 

Girl: He was my first date, and I didn't know. Dean. 

Dean: Hawhat was it yooou didn't know, chihuld? 

Girl: Whether to let him call me by my first name 
or not. (Bawling quite fluently.) 

Dean: Ohohooohooo. (Shrieking) Ohooooohooo. 
To think that one of my own little girls should be so 
unprincipled. I had no ideauuh that it was thees 
sehhrious. You have sinned, my child, but go and 
repent, and you may stahhhy in schoohul. (Girl beats 
it, and dean goes over and starts reading True Con- 
fessions, resignedly.) 




Phi Kappas fill the flowing bowl for rush week. It is 
reported they will follow the time honored custom next 
fall of giving a minnow to each "spikee" as he takes the 
glad hand. 



DISTINCTIVE 
FOOTWEAR 




SHOE STORES^ Inc. 



FOR Men and 
Women 



CO-OP 

Book Store 



The New Yorker 



HULL'S HARDWARE 

SPORTING GOODS 

Best in the Line 
RADIO SETS AND PARTS 

Watch Our Windows 



406 Poyntz 



Dial 2126 



OVER A MILLION 
USERS 



The name Fairbanks-Morse stands for over 60 years of 
constant service to the American public in many capacities. 

The Fairbanks-Morse trade mark is assurance of products 
of the highest quality, designed by engineers whose know- 
ledge is backed by years of research and experience, and pro- 
duced by craftsmen who have at hand every modern means 
for precision workmanship. 

Farm Engines, Home Light Plants, Home Water Plants, 
Feed Grinders, Windmills, Electrical Machinery, Diesel 
Type Oil Engines, Pumps and Railway Equipment and 
Fairbanks Scales. 



Fairbanks, Morse & Company 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Branch House of Fairbanks, Morse & Co. 
Manufacturers: Chicago, U. S. A. 



Fairbanks-Morse 
Products 




"Every Line 
a Leader" 



(Continued from page 382^ 

Perthy: And mythelf am a brother in eight messes. 
Think what it means, fellows. 

Chorus: Well, what does it mean? 

Perthy: Why, we can swing the election. 

Algy: But what good will that do us? 

Per. : Why, lisshen, mutt, we can fix it so it won't be 
any popularity contesh. I know what we'll do. We'll 
put the biggesht saps in college in the places and they'll 
have to like it. We'll pick the biggest bores we can 
think of, the most misherable asshes in thish whole 
institushion. 

Chorus: We will, all right, we will. BOY, BRING 
US A CASE OF LEMON. 

(Here the curtain falls, and the audience realizes that 
the plotters are carrying out their nefarious plans. The 
curtain rises to show three men strolling on the campus: 
Alex Barneck, eighth semester sophomore; James Pratt, 
disgrace of the commerce department; and the potential 
G. Gorrell Biles. It is evident that the sentence of the 
student body is upon them. 

Pratt: Well, I've lived down worse things. 

Barneck: And I, being an engineer. 

Biles: But to think, that we should come to this. 
(Here all three draw a handkerchief and snuffle. The 
audience also becomes sympathetic and bawls as the 
curtain drops.) 

The End 

■' Editor: This last part was useless, and I apologize for 

your reading of it. Anyone knows that after the three 
bad men set out to elect the greatest goofs in school that 
the results were inevitable. 



Glances at the Great 

Believing that he had no chance of hanging up a 
record for service at Kansas State, J. T. Willard has 
disgustedly resigned from deanship of the general science 
division. The dean has been connected with the insti- 
tution for some months. 



"Hoxie" Freeman, wee athlete, is reported to have 
made a goal in one of last winter's basketball contests. 
S. G. A. is conducting an investigation to determine the 

facts. 

* * * 

Half of the college year was spent by two thirds of the 
students in attempting to select a name for the campus. 
Favorable titles include: Purple Hill, Big Bump, Little 
Mountain, Happy Valley, and the Smiling Pool. 

* * * 

Two others besides ye ed. were not given class office 
during the educational season. Some remedy is needed 
for this unprecedented situation. There should be at 
least enough offices to go around once. 

* * * 

"Prexy" Farrell gave a speech at Podunka, Maine, 
during May 1920 in which he used the term "agriculture" 
only once every three words. 



Page 39S 



The New Yorker 



Quality 
and 



Style 



At a Fair Price 



Is the established motto of the 
store. Coupled with these very 
important factors you will find 
courteous service awaiting you. 

Ladies' and Children's 
Ready-to-Wear 

Millinery Dry Goods 

Basement Department Draperies 



Spot Cash Store 



' McniJhittcni' s Sbopph/g Center 



DIAL 



3555 or 4112 

For the best to be had in Dry Cleaning 



CLCANCRS ^ DVER8 

R.J. Shaidnagle, Prop. 



TWO STORES 

PLANT BRANCH 

722 N. Manhattan 107 S. Fourth Street 

We cater to the part/c///c/r — 
We're here to stciy. 



The New Yorker 



BARBER'S 

CLEANERS & DYERS 




Specialists in Rug, Drapery, 

Curtains and Upholstered 

Furniture Cleaning 

"y4 Higher Quality and 

Better Service 

For Less" 




Diamonds-- 

the Symbol 

of Success in 

All Things 

BANGS & CO. 

308 Poyntz Avenue 
Manhattan, Kansas 



Fashion Park Clothes 

Stetson Hats 

Florsheim Shoes 



JERRY WILS 

Clothier 

312 POYNTZ AVENUE 



T/IK 



SANDWICA 




SAOP 



A Delightful Place 
TO DINE 

Whether It Be For 
BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON 
OR DINNER 

George Scheu, Prop. 
5th and Poyntz 



The New Yorker 



Glances at the Great 

Karl Pfuetze, who won the roads scholarship in the 
'02 intersemester bicycle finals, was disqualified this year 
because of professionalism in connection with the 
Y. M. C. A. 



The college library has been located. It is three 
miles due north of the administration building, and con- 
tains several volumes on love and marriage, for the in- 
struction of those in home ec who might otherwise have 
become spinsters. 

* * * 

Journalism's bad girl, Gladys Shafer, is out after her 
first husband. On your marks, Peggy Hopkins Joyce, 
'twill be a stiff race. 



K. U. received a good trimming in the past football 
era at the hands of football and tonsorial experts from 
this college. 

* * * 

The victory over Missouri is explained in the follow- 
ing way: Alex Nigro became ill and couldn't play. And 
the rest of the boys went out on the field and fought so 
that they could capture the big score and bring it to 
Alex, and make him feel well again. 

* * * 

Stirred by some unsuspected ambition, the engineer- 
ing division promoted the addition of a new letter in 
concrete to be placed on Mount Prospect. Someone will 
probably spell out Kansas State Agricultural college some 
day when a few more hills can be induced to park them- 
selves in the proper locations. 



f^ 



X i 



Dedioatfd v>i 


tn esB 


■'"" •'" '-^"'•■■'" 


no. 


H. voir. 


I."., 


be:,, 


I. 

How'younHin r^tos ' 
The PI PhU wa.T.c<l- 
The Zotaa tried -to 


rop<^ hi -I in, 


id 


Alpha Xi 


:, 


:%f 


Chorus: 

Tin She g^t 


»n Yoimklr. stror.r;, 
his >Hy, »v<.ry_ Ky- 


1 • 


"'.hf Trl 
■., hlB d 


>!? 


"■:' 


He took the 
And r.n the 
Left Coffman 
Cauee he .01 
He taJtee Uie 
Then taken h 


pick 
rent 


°n 01 , n<- 
liolj. n y^l. 

upon tho . or 


h:. 


,>„dr'h 


he''" 


It. 


Chorua. 














S. 

H* •o..l4n't late a 
H* .Wldn-t .late a 
■•'■ not a i»rr«cl 
H* left a llll'o ? 


fUdly Ohl 
1 Phi Jus', to 


or 


ly Knppa 
a <ll/,jy 
on Alpha 


%; 


XI 



Ik. 



9 i^-^^V/^^C^«H3^ 



To the "K- Aggies 



JJ 



We consider THE ROYAL PURPLE 
the ideal medium in which to try 
to express our appreciation of your 
patronage. You are largely re- 
sponsible for our success in Man- 
hattan — and we are truly grateful. 

It is our pleasure to offer you at all 
times the choicest selections at 
greatest savings — the two char- 
acteristics that have earned us the 
name: 



'M.anhattan\s Big Store' 




DEPARTMENT STORE 



The New Yorker 




Seek Your Wants 



'" m " 



J. 



THRIFT STORES 
^^ 

Visualizing the wants of this com- 
munity, we have stocked this store 
with New Merchandise for the 
spring and summer that will appeal 
to all. 

The new things, the smart things, 
the desirable things, the things 
that add to the charm and happi- 
ness of life, for personal use and for 
the home ... all find satisfaction 
in our store. 

Seek your needs and wants in the 
J. C. Penney Store . . our thrift 
price policy will save you money. 




IF 



YOU WONDER WHERE STUDENTS 

GET THAT 

WELL DRESSED APPEARANCE 

Try 




AGGIEVILLE 



THANK YOU . . . 

for your patronage 

Our efforts are to furnish you high-class 
products. 



Wylli's Candy Shop 

Aggieville 




Page 1,02 



The New Yorker 



SPEAKING 

of 
TEXT-BOOKS 




K 



ANSAS FARMER is the most used textbook of thousands of Kan- 
sas farmers. They read it thoroughly every week and find it al- 
ways different and ever useful. 

A. P. Davidson, associate professor of vocational agriculture at K. S. 
A. C. says, "Text-books no longer reign supreme in the field of voca- 
tional agriculture instruction. One of the best mediums offering sea- 
sonal instruction is the farm press." Mr. Davidson in his survey of 112 
vocational agriculture departments of Kansas high schools found 67 
farm papers in use, with Kansas Farmer heading the list as the only 
farm paper in all of the 112 schools. In 93% of these schools it was 
used as an actual text. 

Many graduates of K. S. A. C, who are applying their education in 
practical farming, have found Kansas Farmer to be full of workable 
ideas that are always up-to-the-minute. 




^ [mhil & breeze] 0— 

PUBLISHED BY ARIHUR CAPPER 



Topeka, 



Ki 



The New Yorker 



TOPEKA FLOUR MILLS CORP. 

Ma>2ufactunrs 
K-Y Family and GOLD BELL Bakery Flours 



RICHARDS PAINT & PAPER CO. 

Retail and Wholesale 




PAINTS— VARNISHES— LACQUER 

Plate Glass, Automobile Glass 

Window Glass, Wall Paper 

CHARLES E. KAUP, Manager 
305 Poyntz 



734 Kansas Avenue Telephone 4668 

"For Better Impressions" 



BRAND OF QUALITT 



INKED RIBBONS : CARBON PAPER 
G. E. VALLETTE Topeka, Kansas 



E. L. OVERTON ELECTRICAL CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers 
in Everything Electrical 



522 Jackson 



Topeka, Kansas 



Phone 6922 




JOHN DEERE 

HE GAVE TO THE WORLD 
THE STEEL PLOW 



John Deere Plo\v Company 



Kansas City, Missouri 



Page J,Oi 



The New Yorker 



C. A. 


WILSON TIRE CO. 




Tires and Tire Repairing 




Road Service 




^^ 


Fifteen Years of Successful Tire Business 





Manufacturers of Dependable 

Living Room, Bed Room and 
Dining Room Furniture 



Abemathy Furniture Co. 

1501-1525 West Nnith St. Kansas City, Mo. 



^ '^Tfinrr about our service, methods and 
^fnrti facilities would not interest you 

^*^*^*^^ " very much, if you did not get your 

bundle when you wanted it. 

D 2 . We believe our shirt and collar work will 

I 9 please the most particular. Many of our 

A 4 customers tell us this, and we have many 

L 3 critical patrons. 

MANHATTAN LAUNDRY 
200 Humboldt 



The New Yorker 




Soda Fountain and Luncheonette 

All Popular Toilet Articles 
and Drug Sundries 



C R O W D E R 


'S 


CLEANERS 




Eventually 




Some friend will advise you to 
have your clothing refreshed 
at our plant. You will then 
compliment your friend for his 
excellent judgment. 




Phone 2.437 H. 


Ginter, Proprietor 



Contents 



Page 

Administration 25-40 

Babcock, Dean R. W 33 

Board of Regents 25 

Call, Dean L. E 29 

Correll, Dean CM 32 

Dvkstra, Dean R. R 36 

Farrell, Pres. F. D 26 

Ford, K. L 40 

Holton, Dean E. L 35 

Holtz, Dr. A. A 37 

Justin, Dean Margaret M 34 

Machir, Jessie McD., Registrar 28 

S. G. A.' 38-39 

Seaton, Dean R. A 30 

Umberger, Dean H 31 

Van Zile, Dean Mary P 27 

Willard, DeanJ. T 32 

Ag Barnwarmer 135 

Aggie Knights 316 

Agricultural Association 134 

Agricultural Economics Club 136 

Agricultural Student 349 

A. I. E. E 141 

Alpha Beta Literary Society 213 

Alpha Kappa Psi 221 

Alpha Zeta 137 

Apple Judging Team 343 

A. S. A. E 142 

A. S. C. E 143 

Athenian Literary Society 214 

Athletic Council 50 

Band 130 

Baseball 286-293 

Basketball 172-178 

Beauty Section 232-240 

Block and Bridle 138 

Browning Literary Society 215 

Cheer Leader 66 

Collegian 350-351 

Collegiate 4-H Club 139 

Cosmopolitan Club 222 

Cross Country 69 

Dairy Club 345 

Dairy Judging Team 345 

Enchiladas 223 

Engineering Association 144 

Engineer's Open House 317 

EuRODELPHi an Literary Society 216 

Fall Features 146-152 

Fall Queen 145 

Football 51-65 

Franklin Literary Society 217 

Fraternities 82-129 

Acacia 82-83 

Alpha Gamma Rho 84-85 

Alpha Rho Chi 86-87 

Alpha Sigma Psi 88-89 



Alpha Tau Omega 90-91 

Beta Pi Epsilon 92-93 

BetaTheta Pi 94-95 

Delta Nu Omega 96-97 

Delta Sigma Phi 98-99 

Delta Tau Delta 100-101 

Farm House 102-103 

Kap ■ a Sigma 104-105 

Lambda Chi Alpha 106-107 

Omega Tau Epsilon 108-109 

Phi Delta Theta 110-111 

Phi Kappa 112-113 

Phi Kappa Tau 114-115 

Phi Lambda Theta 116-117 

Phi Sigma Kappa 118-119 

Pi Kappa Alpha 120-121 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 122-123 

Sigma Nu 124-125 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 126-127 

Sigma Phi Sigma 128-129 

Fraternity Housemothers 81 

Freshman Class 41-49 

Freshman Men"s Panhellenic 80 

Freshmen Women's Panhellenic 186 

Friars 319 

Gargoyle Club 320 

Golf 303 

Hamilton Literary Society 218 

Hay and Grain 344 

Horticulture Club 343 

Intersociety Council 211 

Intersociety Oratory and Debate. . .212 

Intramural, Fall 70-71 

Intramural, Spring 304-305 

Intramural, Winter 182-183 

Ionian Literary Society 219 

Junior Class 161-171 

Junior Stock Judging Team 342 

"K" Fraternity 67 

Kansas State Engineer 352 

Kappa Beta 321 

Kappa Phi 224 

Klod and Kernel Klub 140 

K. S. A. C. S. C. A. V. M. A 341 

Lutheran Student Association 225 

Men's Glee Club 132 

Men's Meat Judging Team 340 

Men's Rifle Team 314 

Military 306-313 

Military Band 315 

Mortar and Ball, 322 

Mortar Board 323 

Mu Phi Epsilon 324 

Newman Club 325 

Omicron Nu 318 

Orchestra 131 

Pax 326 



Page 

Phi Alpha Mu 327 

Phi Kappa Phi 328 

Phi Mu Alpha 227 

Pi Epsilon Pi 68 

Pi Kappa Delta 228 

Poultry Judging Team 344 

Prix 229 

Publicity 226 

Purple Pepsters 74 

Quill Clud 230 

Royal Purple Board 348 

Royal Purple Staff 346-347 

Scabbard and Blade 329 

Scarab 231 

Senior Class 249-285 

Senior Men's Panhellenic 79 

Senior Stock Judging Team 342 

Senior Women's Panhellenic 185 

Sigma Delta Chi 232 

Sigma Tau 330-331 

Sophomore Class 153-160 

Sororities 188-209 

Alpha Delta Pi 188-189 

Alpha Theta Chi 190-191 

Alpha Xi Delta 192-193 

Beta Phi Alpha 194-195 

Chi Omega 196-197 

Delta Delta Delta 198-199 

Delta Zeta 200-201 

Kappa Delta 202-203 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 204-205 

Pi Beta Phi 206-207 

Phi Omega Pi 208-209 

Sorority Housemothers 187 

Spring Queen 353 

Spring Zephyrs 254-360 

Steel Ring 332 

Swimming 184 

Tennis 302 

The New Yorker 361-408 

Theta Epsilon 333 

Theta Pi 335 

Theta Sigma Phi 334 

Track 294-301 

Van Zile Hall 210 

Webster Literary Society 220 

Winter Queen 241 

Winter Wanderings 242-248 

Wise Club 336 

Women's Athletic Associ.\TioN 72-73, 76-78 

Women's Glee Club 133 

Women's "K " Fr.vternity 75 

Women's Meat Judging Team 339 

Women's Rifle Team 314 

Wrestling 179-181 

Y. M. C. A 337 

Y. W. C. A 338 



Contents 



Index to Advertisers 



Abernathy Furniture Co 405 

Aggie Hardware & Elec. Co 381 

Art Craft 375 

A. V. Laundry 385 

Bangs & Co..' 400 

Barber Cleaners 400 

Bardvvell & Bardwell 383 

Bon Nette Shoppe 402 

Boone & Sons 373 

Bray, Hotel 382 

Brewer Motor Co 369 

Brown Motor Co 382 

Browne Sparr Studio 389 

Burger-Bowman-Matthews Lbr 370 

Capital Iron Works Co 391 

Chappell's Creamery 393 

Chickasha Cotton Oil Co 390 

Clay & Co 366 

D. O. Coe Seed & Grain Co 373 

Coles 401 

College Book Store 365 

College Canteen 393 

College Drug Store 406 

College Shoe Store 378 

Cook-Dillingham Shoe Store 397 

Co-op Book Store 397 

Cotrcll & Leonard 388 

Crider Bros. Comm. Co 391 

Crowders Cleaners 406 

Diehl Hedge Furn. Co 364 

Dooley, Paul 381 

Duckwall Stores Co 372 

Dusenbury's Candy Shop 368 

Elite Cleaners 368 

Endacott Book Store 373 



Vage 

Evans, J. W., M. D 368 

Fairbanks Morse & Co 398 

Farmers Union 365 

First and Last Chance 368 

Gavit & Co 396 

Gibbs Clothing Co 364 

Gleaner Combine Harv. Corp 360 

Gold Medal Bakery 368 

Golden Belt Lbr. Co 370 

Grasselli Chemical Co 381 

Helmers Manufacturing Co 388 

Holmstrom Feed & Seed Co 373 

Hull Hardware 398 

Hygrade Food Prod. Assn 380 

Imes Motor Co 391 

Jensen Salsberg Laboratory 388 

John Deere Plow Co 404 

Kans. Carbon & Ribbon Co 404 

Kansas City Paper House 387 

Kansas Farmer 403 

Kansas Pipe Line & Gas Co 369 

Robt. Keith Furn. Co 377 

Kennedy Supply Co 396 

Lambert Lbr. Co 370 

La\'ton's Orchestra 394 

Letts-Mellick Gro. Co 377 

Long Oil Co 392 

McCord, Hal 378 

McDonald Co., A. G 388 

Manhattan Clearing House 386 

Manhattan Fruit & Veg. Co 376 

Manhattan Laundry 405 

Manhattan Motors Co 390 

Manhattan Typewriter Emp 365 

Marshall-Wareham Theatres 384 

Mid-Continent Paint & Lac 383 



?age 

Miller, Sam 391 

Miller Theatre 374 

Montgomery Ward & Co 375 

Moore, Walter E 392 

Muehlebach Hotel 395 

Nu Style Shop '. . . .368 

Nu Way Cleaners and Dyers 399 

Nygren, C. J 373 

Olson Shoe Shop 368 

Overton Elec. Co 404 

Palace Drug Co 378 

Penney Co., J. C 402 

Perry Packing Co 385 

Pioneer Mortgage Co 385 

Public Utilities Inv. Co 362 

Ramey Bros. Lbr. Co 370 

Rexall Drug Stores 364 

Richards Paint Co 404 

Smith, Robt. C 380 

Scheu Sandwich Shop 400 

Spot Cash Store 399 

Stevens Clothing Co 385 

Students Inn 364 

Style Shop, The 396 

Swift & Henrv L. S. Comm. Co 38? 

Todd Motor Co 391 

Topeka Flour Mills Corp 404 

Topeka Wholesale Gro. Co 391 

Varsity Clothing Co 402 

Vanity Fair Shoppe 405 

Walters, Frank H 372 

Wareham Ballroom 394 

Wilson Clothing Co., Jerry 400 

Wilson Egan & Co 383 

Wilson Tire Co., C. T 405 

Wylli's Candy Shop 402 



Pagv. hOS 



Wi- 



imiT'CISreyE" 



■^^m